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Comment: Good readable copy. Shows wear but not excessively. NOT EX LIBRARY. May contain writing, underlining, or highlighting.
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Keeping a Head in School: A Student's Book About Learning Abilities and Learning Disorders Paperback – May, 1990

5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 297 pages
  • Publisher: Educators Pub. Service (May 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0838820697
  • ISBN-13: 978-0838820698
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #346,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
We all have learning disorders, as Mel Levine's Keeping A Head in School points out. The difference in Dr. Levine's approach is that students can learn to identify and remediate their own problems, giving them greater power over their own lives.
In this book Dr. Levine models the strategies he advocates that students learn: Lots of diagrams, webs, illustrations, as well as case studies, fill the pages, helping all readers to better grasp his techniques.
Written with humor and "reader-friendly" language, the handbook explains the complexity of learning disorders in terms all readers can understand. Parents, teachers, counselors, as well as students, will better understand learning and how to maximize their potential after reading this book. The reader will recognize his/her own learning disorders and how to overcome them--whether or not diagnosed as a problem learner. A must read for anyone dealing with this condition.
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Format: Paperback
_Keeping A Head in School_ is designed to help students with a wide range of learning disorders "gain a realistic insight into their personal strengths and weaknesses."
The book is targeted at adolescents and pre-adolescents. It can also be used effectively by younger and older students, however. Dr. Levine makes information accessible to young people by presenting it in small chunks with frequent headings. His style is conversational, and he uses familiar metaphors to explain physiological concepts. Attention, for example, is described in terms of channel selection and filtration.
Levine heartens his readers -- not only by demonstrating a clear understanding of their difficulties but also by providing hope for the success that everyone needs. While he recognizes that people succeed in different areas -- academics, athletics, and art, to name just a few -- he acknowledges that during the school-age years, lack of success in the academic area can have far-reaching
consequences.
After explaining how the brain functions normally to help a person focus attention, use language, and employ memory, Levine discusses various problems that might arise in these areas. He then relates performance in reading, spelling, writing, and math to those disorders. Levine even addresses social skills, recognizing that school has a very strong social component.
Levine celebrates the many strengths that people with learning disorders might have. He encourages them to appreciate and bolster their strengths even as they are attempting to understand and bypass their weaknesses.
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By A Customer on November 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
As the parent of two learning disabled students, I wholeheartedly recommend this book to all the kids out there who are in need of a wonderful guide not only for school, but every day problem solving. My son refers to this book often, for reinforcement, for reassurance, and for guidance. There are many books written about learning disabilities, but this one stands out as a wonderful guide for your child to use.
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Format: Paperback
This is an excellent resource book, which envelopes the various ways which every child/ student learns. How you can target learning issues and enable your child/ student to gain greater access to overcome such learning/ academic obstacles. Every parent/ educator should consider this book which will be a great asset. Dr. Mel Levine is a compassionate, resourceful individual. Combining resources and also sharing from personal case studies.

What I have read and learned will be applied for my two daughters and also students.
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