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Keesha's House Paperback


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 17 years
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); Reprint edition (February 20, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374400121
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374400125
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #870,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up-Frost has taken the poem-story to a new level with well-crafted sestinas and sonnets, leading readers into the souls and psyches of her teen protagonists. The house in the title isn't really Keesha's; it belongs to Joe. His aunt took him in when he was 12, and now that he's an adult and the owner of the place, he is helping out kids in the same situation. Keesha needs a safe place to stay-her mother is dead; her father gets mean when he drinks, and he drinks a lot. She wants to stay in school, all these teens do, and Keesha lets them know they can stay at Joe's. There's Stephie, pregnant at 16, and terrified to tell anyone except her boyfriend. Harris's father threw him out when his son confided that he is gay. Katie's stepfather has taken to coming into her room late at night, and her mother refuses to believe her when she tells. Carmen's parents have run off, and she's been put into juvie for a DUI. Dontay is a foster kid with two parents in jail. Readers also hear from the adults in these young people's lives: teachers, parents, grandparents, and Joe. It sounds like a soap opera, but the poems that recount these stories unfold realistically. Revealing heartbreak and hope, these poems could stand alone, but work best as a story collection. Teens may read this engaging novel without even realizing they are reading poetry.
Angela J. Reynolds, Washington County Cooperative Library Services, Hillsboro, OR
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Gr. 6-10. Like Virginia Euwer Wolff's True Believer (2001) and much contemporary YA fiction, this moving first novel tells the story in a series of dramatic monologues that are personal, poetic, and immediate, with lots of line breaks that make for easy reading, alone or in readers' theater. Keesha finds shelter in a house in her inner-city neighborhood and helps other troubled teens find home and family there ("like finding a sister when I'm old / enough to pick a good one"). Stephie is pregnant, and she's heartbroken that her boyfriend doesn't want the baby. Harris is gay; his dad has thrown him out. Carmen is fighting addiction. Dontay's parents are in jail, and he doesn't feel comfortable in his latest foster home. Interwoven with the angry, desperate teen voices are those of the adults in their lives: caring, helpless, abusive, indifferent. In a long note, Frost talks about the poetic forms she has used, the sestina and the sonnet. But most readers will be less interested in that framework than in the characters, drawn with aching realism, who speak poetry in ordinary words and make connections. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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You will like these kids.
Richie Partington
Even though the book has made-up characters, the story paints a clear picture of serious teenage situations in the real world.
Chris
The best audience of this book would be teenagers, and also highly recommended for adults.
angel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Johannes on October 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Years ago, young Keesha ran away from home, from her verbally abusive, alcoholic father. Since then, she has found comfort in the home of a local resident, Joe, who had a large house and an even larger heart. Joe provided Keesha with a roof over her head and a fresh start in life. Now it's Keesha's turn to give back. As she meets young people in trouble, she invites them to Joe's house, so that they may have a chance to sort out life's problems. Though unconventional and not in line with the state's plans for runaways, Keesha's solution is helping many local teenagers, including Stephanie who is pregnant, Dontay, who is a runaway from foster care, and Harris, a young man whose family will not accept that he is gay. We eventually watch these characters meet and learn from each other. The tragic ending serves to remind us that there's not always a happy ending, but success comes from making the most of your life.
Helen Frost has created a wise and thoughtful character in young Keesha; however, she's not perfect, which makes her more believable and more likeable. When Stephanie is accepted back into her parents' home despite her pregnancy, Keesha's comments reflect the jealousy you'd expect from a 14-year-old who always hoped that her own father would come looking for her. All poems in the book are written in sestinas and sonnets, and each contains multicultural references that will connect the readers to the characters and their environment. The situations are real and prevalent in society, and even though they're sometimes uncomfortable to talk about and read about, young readers from ages 15 on up will appreciate each character's candid, poetic narration.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christy on August 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
unless you have to read for school which I did. I enjoy reading,
and I really enjoy poetry. When I heard the plot for this book
I was looking forward to reading it because it sounded interesting
and similar to other books I have read and loved. Honestly I found
it dull, and as if the author was just trying to stuff in a bunch
of characters and not concentrate on them individually. I didn't
feel heartache for any of them because I only thought of them as a whole.
It was actually sad to me how terribly it portrayed high
school because I'm in high school and she exaggerates and is mistaken
about how people act. I know it's a book and it has to be exaggerated
to be interesting but it seriously reminded me of a more adult Disney
movie with the way she wrote it.

If you're looking for a similar book, but with more genuine qualities
try Ellen Hopkins, whose characters also speak and think in a poetic form.
Another touching book with heart wrenching qualities is Staying Fat
for Sarah Byrnes by Chris Crutcher. I read it twice and could still probably
read it again and get more from it. It was phenomenal and so are all the
books by Ellen Hopkins.

In short this book was a disappointment and there are much better books out there
deserving attention.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Buffheart on April 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Now, I am not one who traditionally likes to read poetry, but I checked this book out from the library and finished it by the end of the day, and not only that but I found it to be quite a delight. The only problem is that it seemed the book went too fast and didn't focus enough on each character and their lives at the house, or afterwards for that matter. However, I would still reccomend this book to all my friends
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pam Snow on January 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Helen Frost does a terrific job of writing characters that all young people can relate to. Each character brings a different set of problems to a house where all are accepted and all are welcome. Tender moments prevail as a group of unwanted misfits manage to create a safe haven and family-like home.

My only concern would be the man who owns the home. Perhaps we don't learn enough about him to be able to ward off uncomfortable feelings. An older man who allows unwanted teenagers to live in his house without paying rent? Let's hope that our young people know enough not to replicate this scenerio, as we know that this picture-perfect setting is realistically not as innocent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By yaar on April 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
In the book Keesha's House , the main character, Keesha, is more than a teenager; she acts like an adult, and she is generous, kind and supportive. The other characters are Katie, Harris, Dontay, Jason, Carmen, Stephie, and Tobias, teenagers who work hard to meet their basic needs. The teenagers who are at Keesha's house have a common situation in their lives; they are neglected by their parents. They spend time at Keesha's house, the only place they trust. Even though there are some conflicts that hold them back, they never miss a day of school or work, and they are kind to each other. Their lives are not great compared to some teenagers who live with their parents but they manage to live. They feel welcome and comfortable at Keesha's house. More mature than their age, they support themselves and comfort each other. Their life experiences orient them to be courageous and more grown up than most teens. I strongly recommend that you read this book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "nabbott6" on June 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In this poem, the lives of six troubled kids entwine. Wrapping around each other like the words to a song, or maybe more like a dance, their words work hard to make everything come out right. The fear of a teen pregnancy and it's consequences to both teens, foster care, DUI, being gay, an abusive stepfather, and the words Ms. Frost uses to convey everything are spare and concise and beautiful.
Surely a Printz Award contender.
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