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Keith Jarrett: The Man And His Music Paperback – March 22, 1992


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Keith Jarrett: The Man And His Music + Keith Jarrett's The Koln Concert (Oxford Studies in Recorded Jazz)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; Reprint edition (March 22, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0306804786
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306804786
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,190,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This adulatory recap of jazz pianist Jarrett's work with Charles Lloyd, Miles Davis and American and European quartets will please his admirers, but others may wish for a more critical assessment. Photos.

Copyright 1992 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Ian Carr is the author of Music Outside and Miles Davis, and coauthor of Jazz: The Essential Companion. He plays trumput, flugelhorn, and keyboards with his band Nucleus, and has appeared on over twenty records, including his own, Old Heartland.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By tjs001 on September 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
I'm not sure why the review below is so negative. Actually, I have been re-discovering Keith Jarrett and, once this reviewer complained about the reviews in the book, I was sold! Just what I was looking for to help me sort through the huge back catalogue! Mr Carr has written this bio in the time-honoured fashion. He does not heap praise on Keith Jarrett's every recording. He reviews every disc (up to the end of the eighties) as one would expect from a biographer - we can't all see an artist live whenever we want to - most of us rely on these "records" of the artist's sound, style and progress or whatever. He gives examples of Jarrett's genius and of his to-be-expected-of-a-person-like-this idiosyncrasies and lets us make up our minds about the man. It's worth reading just for the incredible circumstances surrounding the "Solo Concerts" and "Koln Concert" recordings. Recommended. Hope he updates it in the future.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By FePe on March 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I agree with the first reviewer who writes that "the major problem inherent in books about musicians is that ultimately the only way to understand the artist's music is to listen to it." I see no reason why anyone would want to read this book without having listened to some of Jarrett's music. But those who have will likely be interested in this rather short biography by Ian Carr.
After a short foreword, we hear about Jarrett's childhood, his experiences with his piano teachers in particular and the stories surrounding his child prodigy. In chapter two, entitled 'From Allentown to Berklee and Boston', Ian Carr writes about the struggles to get out of the boring and dead town that Keith thought Allentown was into the more jazz-suited places like Berklee and Boston. Chapter three deals with his going to New York and playing with the Charles Lloyd Quartet, the first major turning point in his career, and the next chapter tells about his experiences on playing the Miles Davis. The following chapters is more about his own persuits where he doesn't have to play in an apprentice's role.
The book has only 195 pages, and that's too little to cover the story of a genius. The book quotes musicians from time to time and those quotations are much like a tv documentary without much depth. Actually the book could well be a tv documentary, because it reads like one - the story about his family relationship, his economic problems, a tour of his albums and so on. Although I have mostly critized the book, I want to recommend it to fans of Keith Jarrett. This is the only book about him, and though it's a little bit shallow, it provides a good picture and overview of his music and his personal life that fans would love to read about.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Lindsay on January 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
This biography comes with a cheesy title but if you are a fan it does provide useful information about "the man and his music." The writer Ian Carr was a British jazz musician who later became a music professor. The book was published in 1991 and is a little out of date. This book's chief virtue is that Carr, unlike many music critics, really understands music and he does a great job reviewing Jarrett's major albums. I enjoyed Carr's contributions to the Rough Guide to Jazz. He has great taste and any album he has recommended I usually enjoyed. Carr was a, man convinced of Jarrett's genius but for me such praise now seems overblown. Jarrett no longer seems quite the towering figure he did in the 1970s.

Carr writes about Jarrett's non-musical life, but unlike most jazz artists of the past, Jarrett hasn't had a particularly eventful life. Carr is also very polite and respectful, so this part of the book is a little dull. We learn that Jarrett came from a small town in Pennsylvania where nothing eventful ever happened and he left as soon as possible. By the time he was 21 he had become a star.

I discovered Jarrett in 1971 when somebody played me an album he recorded with Gary Burton. I was 14 and I became hooked on jazz for the next 10 years or so. Jarrett became one of my heroes and the Burton record also introduced me to jazz-rock. Carr describes the recording as a "very fine LP" and notes that it received 5 stars from Downbeat. Listened to today it sounds a little dated and tame. Sam Brown's tinny sounding electric guitar can't compete with what came later from John McLaughlin and Al DiMeola. Jarrett never recorded another album with Burton, who developed a partnership with Chick Corea.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donswald on May 20, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The fact is simply that this book is twenty years old, and Jarrett has remained active the entire time since its publication. His career has continued to evolve and he has continued to release mammoth works which redefine Jarrett as an artist.

The book is very well-written, informative and entertaining, I can only hope that the author will release a significantly updated version, or that some other ambitious author will take up Ian Carr's mantel.
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