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  • Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN
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Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN

by Kenko
| 12 answered questions

Price: $169.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 12 left in stock.
Sold by ewave7 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • Designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal set
  • Very Useful for Macro Photography
  • The Extension Tubes have no optics
  • Focus Closer to the objects you see and enjoy the feel of photography
  • Auto Extension Tube Set for the Nikon AF Mount
17 new from $150.00

Frequently Bought Together

Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN + NEEWER® Macro Ring LED Light - Works with Canon/Sony/Nikon/Sigma lenses
Price for both: $205.26

Buy the selected items together



Product Details

  • Item Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B000JG88JU
  • Item model number: KE_EXTNDG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: October 30, 2007

Product Description

Designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal set Very Useful for Macro Photography The Extension Tubes have no optics Focus Closer to the objects you see and enjoy the feel of photography Auto Extension Tube Set for the Nikon AF Mount

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Must use lens over 100 mm for best results .
ajveke62
Great way to use current lenses to get some awesome macro images without having to buy an expensive macro lens.
NPW
I've taken some great pics with these but I do find them difficult to use - or maybe it's just me.
Theresa Saint

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

69 of 72 people found the following review helpful By E TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 31, 2007
If you are looking for a functional macro, for example to take pictures of individual flowers, keep in mind that these extension tubes work better on telephoto lenses for this purpose.

Use of any of these tubes on a lens with a focal length of less than 55mm (on a digital camera with an APS-C sensor, 1.5x crop) will result in a focusing distance so close you would only be able to photograph the individual stamen. For example, with the 36mm tube on a 50mm lens, I could capture a human hair from a few inches away. Even the 12mm on a 50mm lens results in an exceptionally close focusing distance (eg, photographing a small nail). However, with the 12mm tube on an 85mm lens, I can capture a flower at about 18 inches away.

The tubes are decently made. I have the light-weight plastic Nikon lenses, so not a problem for these and no flexing.
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53 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Scott Hesh on March 3, 2007
Another essential tool for the photographers bag. AF and metering worked well with Nikon D70. Takes a bit of practice, but it makes you a better photographer. Like having a prime 50mm. You'll find yourself (tripod) moving instead of zooming. Makes photgraphing macros challenging and very fun. Amazing shots. Tripod is almost manditory.

Wish the build quality was a little better. Extensions are plastic (& aluminum) and feel flimsy. Mounted a 70-300mm with all three extension, noticed bowing on the outside, but pictures were fine. Didn't trust it, had to have a hand on the lens. Feels fragile with with all three mounted. Still works perfect though.

Very fun to photograph macro shot with any lens. Opens a whole new world. Great kit, lots of options. Made in Japan. Probably more durable than it looks. Buy it.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By theChris on April 3, 2011
Verified Purchase
These Kenko extension tubes are fun for amateurs and great for specific professional uses.

Build Quality:
Feels like a quality product right out of the box. The mounts are metal which gives me confidence using all three tubes between my lenses and the camera. The tubes are plastic, but sufficient quality for average use and abuse. Connecting the tubes to a lens; however, is a little disconcerting because you can feel the bearings of the lens catch on the electronic contacts of the tube that pass the signal on to the camera. It's clear now that no damage is being done, but I still connect lenses slowly to avoid any problems. Lens weight becomes an issue when trying to attach a 70-300mm VR lens, especially when using all three extensions between the lens and camera body. Sagging of the lens and slight separation between the metal mounts of each tube is noticeable. I would feel safer if Kenko offered a 'lens collar' solution for such conditions to prevent the camera body taking all the weight. However, for my macro and small zoom lenses, I have no worries while I'm shooting.

Quirks:
Experimenting with extension tubes is a lot of fun, but you could experience instant buyer's remorse if you don't have the right lens. Extension tubes allow you to focus on objects that are otherwise too close for the lens to focus on. This is great when using a 70-300mm lens for macro photography, but zoomed in with my 18-70mm DX lens with all extensions attached I was able to focus on the dust resting on the front glass element of the lens itself! Amusing, but the working distance was too shallow to be useful. (My favorite combo is using my 60mm micro lens with all 3 tubes) Auto-focus comes and goes and depends on how many tubes you have stacked as well as available light.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on October 28, 2010
I got the Kenko extension tubes set to try my hand at macro photography with my Nikon D5000. The Kenko DG tubes are electronically fully compatible with Nikon AF-S lenses. Metering is fully supported with these tubes and you can even auto-focus if you like. I have tried both auto-focusing and manually focusing in Live mode with the Adorama Budget Macro Focusing Rail Set with 4 Way, Fine Control, Camera Focusing Rail for Macro Photography. I'm not sure which I prefer yet, as I am still developing my technique.

I have tried the 12mm with my Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras, and it works but the focusing distance -- even with such a short extension -- is uncomfortably short for me. So I have mostly used these tubes with my Nikon 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED IF AF-S DX VR [Vibration Reduction] Zoom Nikkor Lens. Using the extension tubes with a tele zoom is quite flexible. Because extension tubes modify magnification differently for different focal length lenses, zooming changes the maximum magnification as well as the focal distance with the zoom. So you can frame the shot using the zoom or set the focal distance to something comfortable for the given subject just by adjusting the zoom.

The "gotcha" in using extension tubes with a tele lens is that, while you get better focusing distance with a tele, you also get less magnification. The way to figure out how much magnification you'll get is by reading the spec for your lens.
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