Buy used:
$7.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Used: Good | Details
Sold by GENEL
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good Disc Fully Guaranteed to play perfectly; Complete with Case, Insert Art & Cover Art; NO SALES TAX
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.75
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Keoma
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Keoma


Available from these sellers.
4 new from $10.26 13 used from $3.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD 1-Disc Version
$10.26 $3.98

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Franco Nero, William Berger, Olga Karlatos, Orso Maria Guerrini, Gabriella Giacobbe
  • Directors: Enzo G. Castellari
  • Writers: Joshua Sinclair, Enzo G. Castellari, George Eastman, Mino Roli, Nico Ducci
  • Producers: Manolo Bolognini
  • Format: Anamorphic, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Starz / Anchor Bay
  • DVD Release Date: July 24, 2001
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000059PPU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #495,740 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Keoma" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Interview with star Franco Nero

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Stiggs on January 6, 2002
Format: DVD
Review of Anchor Bay DVD production of Keoma

THE BAD

Post-sound production sound work. The voices are over-modulated, hissy, gritty and raspy. The voices overpower the ambience sounds. Every other word breaks up as if the actors were to close to a cheap microphone. The effect is that the voices to seem to be disembodied from the actors. The good mood music and songs are so compressed and muddy that all ambience, and dynamics of the music are lost. The background ambience sounds such as horses hoofs or wind or gunshots are compressed, muffled or to low. The film stock although clear, crisp and colorful has a cheap look.

The accents are at times over the top except the Protagonist. He is supposed to be a half-breed Native American - but has an Italian accent. In one scene a man twists and falls seemingly before the gun is fired. There are a couple of obvious novice actors. There are some embarrassing pretentious macho cliches and campy dialogue... That said...Read on...

THE GOOD.

Keoma is full of style, artistry, imagination, atmosphere, pathos and symbolism. There are authentic looking frontier ghost towns and western paraphernalia, dust storms, rain storms, dark hazy nights, crazed mobs, smoky bars, gritty costumes and a some good, albeit mostly unknown, character actors.

The camera work is magical. The movie is shot through and or framed with in wagon wheels, fire, running water, fingers, tattered rags, fence-posts, stair railings, halfcocked doors, splits and cracks in lumber and bullet holes.

The editing works well splicing in slow motion scenes far better then others - outside of Peckinpah.

The actors fit their rolls well.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Diego Cordoba on September 4, 2001
Format: DVD
This is really a great western and is along with Damiani's A Bullet for the General, one of the best italian westerns along with those made by the three great Sergios (Corbucci, Leone and Sollima). What's even more fascinating is how Castellari managed to make a film with no script, making up the dialogs as the shooting went along (even if he copied a bevy of filmakers along the way; try to figure them out as you watch the film), all this adding to it's really bleak and bizarre look. I actually enjoyed the music which was a reference to Altman's great western McCabe & Mrs. Miller. And Franco Nero never looked better and cooler than in this film!
Though the film was made at a time when italian westerns were practically dead, as they had already been made into a parody with the Trinity films, Keoma didn't manage to resurrect the genre. Why? Maybe because nobody could figure a way to top this film, which gives you a general idea of how good it is.
The DVD copy is absolutely brilliant, as is anything coming from Anchor Bay, and it features a great commentary by Castellari himself (though I find annoying the journalists Anchor Bay send to view the films along with the directors, as any real fan would have a trillion more questions to ask).
Overall, a great film that should be (re)discovered by any western fan!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Martinez on July 31, 2001
Format: DVD
KEOMA is arguably Castellari's best movie, up there alongside HIGH CRIME, THE BIG RACKET, THE INGLORIOUS BASTARDS, and STREET LAW. Rarely has Castellari excelled so well at creating pure poeticism through editing and camera techniques. The story often feels disjointed or confusing, but overall the experience is very rewarding with plenty of action, an engaging storyline, well-rounded characters, an excellent cast, and a good (if overused) soundtrack by Guido and Maurizio De Angelis. Where the movie really takes off are its use of slow motion and bizarre seemless scene transitions.
The DVD is absolutely loaded as it comes with a dazzling commentary by Enzo G. Castellari. Unlike Umberto Lenzi or Dario Argento, Castellari does not have a thick Italian accent so it's relatively easy to understand everything he says. He does trail off at a few points when he really should be giving background on the actors and techniques, but the commentary does not fail in being one of the most INTERESTING I have heard in a long time. It's too bad the journalist who mediated the commentary didn't seem to have a very wide knowledge of the genre, though he was able to recognize Donal O'Brien from ZOMBI HOLOCAUST.
The picture quality is beyond crisp, this is the best the movie has ever looked (yeah I know it's a cliche to say this about Anchor Bay DVDs, but this one deserves it). The film is also the UNCUT version which has never been available in the states, and also is presented in its proper widescreen aspect ratio for the first time anywhere ever. Those like me who bought the old import tape from Holland will be blown away because the look of the film is so different than before.
The only flaw is the sound, which sounds a tad hissy when the actors are talking.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on August 16, 2004
Format: DVD
Spaghetti westerns are, in my opinion, generally the best fictional films about the American West. You can argue that John Wayne made a bunch of great movies about life in the Old West, and you would be right to say so, but for some reason the Italians captured perfectly the specific elements of the era that made their movies seem more realistic. The frontier was a dirty, violent place full of unsavory types trying to get rich quick. Italian westerns capture this mood expertly whereas American films portray characters whose outfits look like they just came back from the dry cleaners. Hollywood films also tend to apply a black and white dichotomy onto their characters, the old "good guys wear white, bad guys wear black" philosophy that obscures the reality of the time and place. Not so in Italian films, where even the good guys often have distinctly unsavory traits. It's too bad spaghetti westerns went the way of the dinosaurs a few decades back; I never tire of watching these films even though I am not an expert on the genre. "Keoma," part of the larger Anchor Bay "Once Upon a Time in Italy" spaghetti western box set, serves as an excellent example of how powerful the genre once was.

Surprisingly, I discovered none other than director Enzo G. Castellari lensed this epic western, and actually made it when the spaghetti western genre was essentially dead on its feet. Castellari's name should ring a few bells with fans of low budget Italian schlock; he's the guy who made "1990: The Bronx Warriors" and "Escape From the Bronx," two science fiction films of such mediocre standards that anyone who appreciates such things should immediately check them out. With "Keoma," Castellari proves he's much better than most of his output.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions