Buy New
$26.19
Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.95
  • You Save: $13.76 (34%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Kes (The Criterion Collec... has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $7.28
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Kes (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]

4.6 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

Additional Multi-Format options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
Multi-Format
(Apr 19, 2011)
"Please retry"
Special ed.
1
$26.19
$24.99 $18.00
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$26.19 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Kes (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • Yi Yi (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
Total price: $53.23
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Named by the British Film Institute as one of the ten best British films of the century, Kes, from Ken Loach (Hidden Agenda, The Wind That Shakes the Barley), is cinema’s quintessential portrait of working-class Northern England. Billy (an astonishingly naturalistic David Bradley) is a fifteen-year-old miner’s son whose close bond with a wild kestrel provides him with a spiritual escape from his dead-end life. Kes established the sociopolitical engagement and artistic brilliance of its filmmaker, and pushed the British “angry young man” film of the sixties into a new realm of authenticity, using real locations and nonprofessional actors. Loach’s poignant coming-of-age drama remains its now legendary director’s most beloved and influential film.

Special Features

  • New, restored digital transfer, approved by director Ken Loach and director of photography Chris Menges, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition

    Making “Kes”, a new documentary featuring Loach, Menges, producer Tony Garnett, and actor David Bradley

    The Southbank Show: “Ken Loach” (1993), a profile of the filmmaker, featuring Loach, Garnett, directors Stephen Frears and Alan Parker, and other Loach collaborators

    Cathy Come Home (1967), a feature directed by Loach and produced by Garnett, with an introduction by film writer Graham Fuller

    Original theatrical trailer

    PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by Fuller


  • Product Details

    • Actors: David Bradley, Freddie Fletcher, Lynne Perrie, Colin Welland, Brian Glover
    • Directors: Ken Loach
    • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Special Edition, Widescreen
    • Language: English
    • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
    • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
    • Number of discs: 1
    • Rated: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)
    • Studio: Criterion Collection
    • DVD Release Date: April 19, 2011
    • Run Time: 110 minutes
    • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
    • ASIN: B004JPJHLK
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,798 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

    Customer Reviews

    Top Customer Reviews

    Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
    Kes
    Directed by Ken Loach
    Starring David Bradley, Colin Welland, Brian Glover

    Criterion | 1969 | 110 minutes | Rated PG-13

    Video:
    Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC
    Video resolution: 1080p
    Aspect ratio: 1.66:1

    Audio:
    English: LPCM Mono
    English: Dolby Digital Mono

    Subtitles:
    English SDH

    Disc:
    Single 50GB Blu-ray Disc
    Region A locked

    The film contains brief nudity and scenes which may disturb young children.

    Kes is a very British film, winning two BAFTA awards from its five nominations. Colin Welland won for best supporting actor and was the only professional actor in the film. David Bradley won for most promising newcomer.

    The story deals with a troubled young boy, Billy Casper (Bradley). He is bullied by his older brother at home and similarly treated by his peers in school. He's insolent, not above lying or stealing and does little to encourage people to like him. He's a loner.

    The setting is Barnsley, Yorkshire, in the north of England. If you have ever seen this part of England depicted in other films, you'll know that it's a poor area populated largely by working class people. In the 1960s, that was very much the case. Billy's brother worked in a coal mine, as did most of the town. The two had to share the same bed, so you can imagine how poor they were.

    Anyone unfamiliar with British accents may find the thick Yorkshire dialect hard to follow. It's the main reason that Kes wasn't given a wide release outside England. I'm completely at home with the accent because my grandfather came from Barnsley. He often talked about his tough upbringing and it gives the film additional meaning for me.
    Read more ›
    12 Comments 57 of 58 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    By Moggi on August 26, 2008
    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    I enjoyed this story when I read it at school in the 70's and this is the fourth or fifth time I have watched the movie.

    Very realistic socially (I grew up just a few miles from where this is filmed) and don't doubt that the PE teacher is based in reality.

    Touching and emotional.
    1 Comment 24 of 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: DVD
    A beautiful and tender story that turns around a 15 year-old Yorkshire boy who tames and trains his pet. One of the most remarkable films of that decade directed by that young and raising promise. Ken Loach.
    Comment 25 of 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: DVD
    This film is so beautiful-i saw it in the U.K.I really wish they would release in U.S format so i could have it to keeeep!!It is very realistic real film that gets right under your skin and into the little boy's head.Life is stark and hard for him but when he flys or handles that bird ,it sets his soul free.Not much time left-he's soon going to grow up and have to work in the mine and be smothered by mundane grind like folks around him.Heartbreaking without an once of sentimentality so this film gets you.Somewhat upsetting.But so goddam beautiful.
    1 Comment 25 of 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: Blu-ray
    "Kes," named one of the ten best films of the century by the British Film Institute, is director Ken Loach's portrait of working-class Northern England. Using real locations and non-professional actors, "Kes" is a touching coming-of-age drama. Fifteen-year-old Billy Casper (David Bradley) lives in a ramshackle house with his emotionally remote mother and physically abusive half-brother, Jud. At school, Billy is mistreated by his teachers, who regard him as a hopeless case. His close bond with a wild kestrel provides him with a spiritual escape from his dead-end life.

    "Kes" will remind viewers of "Billy Elliot," since both films are set in the same location and feature young protagonists from blue-collar backgrounds. "Kes" is beautifully directed and young Mr. Bradley turns in a moving, believable performance.

    The newly restored Blu-ray edition's extras include a making-of documentary, a 1993 profile of director Loach, a 1966 television feature by Loach, the alternate internationally released soundtrack, and a booklet with a critical essay.
    Comment 10 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    DVD based on the book A Kestrel for a Knave. Quality of the DVD was excellent. The dialect may pose a problem to unfamiliar ears but it wasn't as bad as I had expected. The film is one of the few that I've seen which almost mirrors the book. A few changes were made but not significant enough to create any undue problems for students who require accurate details. A good helpful guide for students.
    Comment 7 of 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: DVD
    KES. Plain and simple: A MASTERPIECE.

    A powerful, memorable work of art--one that might even change your life.

    The film is not perfect in every detail, yet it's a masterpiece nonetheless. It's authentic. It's unpredictable. It's completely unsentimental, yet very moving. It evokes empathy. It leaves you feeling more alive.

    KES is an unforgettable cinematic experience because it does what very few films even try to do: it gives you a glimpse of the soul, the incorruptible SOUL.
    1 Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse
    Format: DVD
    Although superficially a story about a beleaguered young man who trains a kestrel, the setting in this film is at least as important. Almost a time capsule, the bleak environment of northern England in 1969 is shown in grim detail. The colors, all dark browns and greys, the paucity of prospects beyond "going down pit" (mining), the poverty, bitterness, frustration, and sheer hopelessness of the inhabitants are all in the foreground, presented seriously, with neither affection, condescencion, or condemnation. The authenticity was underscored by the actors' accents, with its "thee" and "thou" ("tha"), incomprehensible, at least to me, without the subtitles. Realistically, the schoolteachers speak a more urban dialect.

    The central character, Billy, is bullied by his older brother Jud (always referred to as "our Jud"), who partway through the film is hinted to have a different relationship that is never made clear. The mother is no help, interested mainly in having a good time at nightclubs with her boyfriend. We soon meet Billy's employer, who like most adults in the film, does little but hurl verbal abuse at him. The teachers are no better, insulting and berating the students at every opportunity. This is encapsulated in a soccer game that evokes every memory of junior high school phys-ed class, and proves the dictum, "those who can, do; those who can't, teach; those who can't teach, teach P.E." Billy is revealed to be an inveterate thief, taking whatever he wants without a second thought. The kestrel is taken from a nest in a wall on a local farmer's property.
    Read more ›
    4 Comments 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    Report abuse

    Most Recent Customer Reviews


    Forums

    There are no discussions about this product yet.
    Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
    Start a new discussion
    Topic:
    First post:
    Prompts for sign-in
     

    Set up an Amazon Giveaway

    Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
    Kes (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
    This item: Kes (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
    Price: $26.19
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

    What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?