Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Kesselring: German Master Strategist of the Second World War Hardcover – November 1, 1996


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.00 $13.63

Featured Military History
Browse books on the Civil War, World Wars, and more. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Greenhill Pr; 1st Ed. (U.K.) edition (November 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853672564
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853672569
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,551,786 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book is back in print! Greenhill books is publishing it. This book is better than Macksey's Guderian and it even seems that Macksey believes that Kesselring was the superior strategist compared to Guderian. You always new that the Field Marshal was one of the top German generals based on the German's defensive efforts in Italy and now you can finally know this amazing man. Macksey points out that Kesselring's lack of publicity was usually due to his modesty and unwillingness to "play the German propaganda machine" as Rommel did through out his career. From World War I, the rise of the Luftwaffe, the battle of Britain, Barbarossa, and finally the Mediterranean front, Kesselring's genius and mistakes are covered in detail. In the end you realize that Kesselring stood near the top of Germany's World War II generals. Macksey is brings Kesselring alive in his book and by the end of the book you may discover what I did -- empathy for this amazing man. --Michael Confoy

About the Author

<DIV><div>Kenneth Macksey joined the Royal Armoured Corps in 1941, saw action in Normandy in 1944 and Germany in 1945, and after World War II spent more than twenty years as an officer of the Royal Tank Regiment. He is internationally known for his works on military history, including Guderian: Panzer General, Kesselring: The Making of the Luftwaffe, and his recent Why the Germans Lose at War.</div></DIV>

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
This isn't a very well written book; it is positively fawning of Kesselring and occasionally unfair his foes (the slighting of Rommel is relentless.) Curiously, after finishing it, I wondered if Kesselring can really be termed a strategist at all in the classical sense. Throughout Kesselring's expertise is proven at the operational level, but I could find only one example of Kesselring's decisionmaking or views impacting effecting strategy -- the fighting in North Africa after El Alamein/Torch. Kesselring is portraited as consistently urging a fight for Tunisia, as opposed to the depressed Rommel, who counsels withdrawal to the mainland. Kesselring wins the argument, and the result is one of Germany's most catastrophic defeats, and certainly its most preventable -- the surrender of 345,000 battle-hardened men, irreplacable tanks and mountains of equipment stores at Tunis. In hindsight it seems unarguable that Kesselring's 'defend Tunisia' viewpoint (which crammed in resources Hitler denied Rommel previosly and desperately needed on the Eastern Front) was disaster strategically despite his operational successes there, yet Macksey never addresses this phenominal blunder, one would assume because Kesselring's advice was clearly wrong.
We are constantly told by the author how brilliant Kesselring was but he doesn't produce many compelling examples to show it. One example is laughable -- Kesselring is praised because he forbid planes to fly with defective bombs that were exploding in mid-air (would only average commanders have allowed flights to continue?!?!?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Michael Confoy on August 3, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book is back in print! Greenhill books is publishing it. This book is better than Macksey's Guderian and it even seems that Macksey believes that Kesselring was the superior strategist compared to Guderian. You always new that the Field Marshal was one of the top German generals based on the German's defensive efforts in Italy and now you can finally know this amazing man. Macksey points out that Kesselring's lack of publicity was usually due to his modesty and unwillingness to "play the German propaganda machine" as Rommel did through out his career. From World War I, the rise of the Luftwaffe, the battle of Britain, Barbarossa, and finally the Mediterranean front, Kesselring's genius and mistakes are covered in detail. In the end you realize that Kesselring stood near the top of Germany's World War II generals. Macksey is brings Kesselring alive in his book and by the end of the book you may discover what I did -- empathy for this amazing man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Curtis Wells on November 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the best of the German Generals whether in his role of revitalizing the Luftwaffe, operating in North Africa or Commanding German forces in the Sicily withdrawal and during the Italian campaign. Except for his smear as a result of the killing of Italian partisans he was one of the best adversaries of the allied forces. Rick Atkinson`s second book of his very readable history of WWII goes into depth on the strategy of "Smiling Al" Kesselring.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. Murray on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
While my copy of Kesselring was the ancient hardcover edition, it took me until last year to finally get around to reading it. This is a disappointing book in that it is typical of much of military history written 30 to 40 years ago. Lacking in the original detail that comes with a well-researched study, this generalized text provides neither balance or a real portrait of this enigmatic general. Macksey fails to rise above his bias or provoke any new discussion on "Smiling Albert" with this mundane biography. My copy went straight to the recycle bin.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.