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Keystone XL: Down the Line (Kindle Single) (TED Books Book 34) Kindle Edition

19 customer reviews

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Kindle, Kindle eBook, March 28, 2013
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Length: 169 pages
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Product Details

  • File Size: 5701 KB
  • Print Length: 169 pages
  • Publisher: TED Conferences (March 28, 2013)
  • Publication Date: March 28, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C0YZKHC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #442,705 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rick Abrams on April 26, 2013
We all have been hearing about the Keystone XL pipeline for a long time and have seen it become a political hot potato. I've often wondered why no one was covering it in a more personal way. What sorts of communities were on the route? What does it look like? What are people "on the ground" actually thinking and feeling as opposed to simply listening to politicians?

This book does exactly what I was waiting for. The text is excellent, but for me the photography really makes it and is fantastic.

When I read news articles or listen to news stories now I have a much better understanding of the the big picture.

As most things in life, it isn't simple. Yes jobs would be great and yes the oil will go somewhere eventually but let's make sure we fully understand what we are doing before we blindly stop it or blindly approve it.

I'm glad this was published and creating it in digital form was very helpful.

This is actually my first Amazon review but I felt it was important to let others know about it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BB on May 2, 2013
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Objectively presented perspectives from both sides and absent intentions to get the reader to one side or another -- a rare accomplishment for writers associated with the Washington Post.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Fan on May 15, 2013
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Overall a very balanced perspective on this controversial topic. Well written and easy to read. I would definitely recommend to anyone looking to get up-to-speed on some of the back-story associated with Keystone XL.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul Sabin on April 14, 2013
Steven Mufson brings a keen journalistic eye to the raging Keystone pipeline controversy. His fascinating account of his recent investigative trip down the entire proposed pipeline route includes interviews with all of the key players, from farmers and oil workers to politicians, industry representatives, and environmentalists. Supporters and opponents will find plenty to learn here, particularly in the many diverse voices, and in Mufson's excellent commentary. "Keystone XL:Down the Line" transforms the Keystone issue from a simple yes/no decision into a complex, multifaceted problem with no easy resolution. A must read for anyone interested in Keystone XL, and contemporary conflicts over energy development in the United States.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Book Shark TOP 500 REVIEWER on February 8, 2014
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Keystone XL: Down the Line by Steven Mufson

"Keystone XL" takes the reader on a journey along the controversial 1,700-mile pipeline. The journey reveals the extent that corporations will go to get oil versus the intrusive effects it has along the pipeline. Energy correspondent for the Washington Post, Steven Mason and his crew treat this topic objectively and professionally but the results are a mixed bag. This uneven 169-page book is broken out into the following three Parts: 1. Canada, 2. The Northern Plains, and 3. The Southern Leg.

Positives:
1. A well-written Kindle Single.
2. A current and fascinating topic. The book in fact touches upon many issues: climate change, energy trade policies, the desire of Native Americans to protect land, and eminent domain.
3. High production value. Plenty of photos and graphs that complement the narrative.
4. Objective and fair treatment of the subject. Munson goes out of his way to present both sides of the issue. It's one of the few books that capture what everyday citizens are going through.
5. The facts. "Canada's economically recoverable oil sands are an immense prize estimated to hold about 170 billion barrels of crude oil, reserves second in size only to those of Saudi Arabia."
6. Does a good job of capturing public perception. "The American public is firmly behind the pipeline. A Washington Post poll in 2012 found nearly 6 in 10 people saying the U.S. government should approve the project; while fewer than two in 10 opposed it. About 83 percent think it will create jobs. Nearly half think it will not cause significant damage to the environment."
7. Impact based on research. "More energy expended means more greenhouse gases.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on February 16, 2015
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The proposed pipeline would cost $7 billion and run 1,700 miles from Alberta to Texas - carrying 830,000 barrels/day. The State Department has issued a draft environmental impact statement suggesting the pipeline would have little impact on climate change because without it, oil sands crude would simply travel by more expensive rail. We already have more than 2 million miles of oil and natural gas pipelines in the U.S. This book addresses the 'What's different?' question while tracing the propose route. Climate change, prairie populism, the Ogallala Aquifer, Native American concerns, and rancher resistance to a Canadian company's right to eminent domain were some of the issues considered.

Canada's economically recoverable oil sands are estimated to hold about 170 billion barrels of crude, reserves that are second in size only to those of Saudi Arabia. The heavy crude in Canada's tar sands is dredged up in a process akin to strip mining. Oil, suspended in gunky sands, lies just below the surface of hundreds of thousands of acres in Alberta. Trucks that are three stories tall, weighing 500 tons (loaded), and costing $7 million are used. Production is now 1.7 million barrels/day, and could nearly double by 2020 to levels nearly 20% of U.S. consumption. Oil prices above $50/barrel are needed to make oil sands profitable. However, the process of extracting oil from the sands alarms those worried about climate change - overall, producers expend energy equal to one barrel of oil to extract 4 - 8 barrels from the oil sands. In addition, stripping the wetlands of pet and fen, natural storers of CO2, adds to the problem.
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