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Kickback Hardcover – September 5, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse; First Edition edition (September 5, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593076592
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593076597
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 6.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,605,644 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

I thought it was a great way to begin a crime novel.
Roberto Alves
The premise is familiar, the plot recognizable, but what makes this story more than a cop drama is the art.
Ann M. Willbanks
I enjoyed this book, but I thought the story needed to be thought through a little bit better.
buttinaseat

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ann M. Willbanks on January 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
David Lloyd's new Graphic Novel delivers what it promises: a crime-noir thriller, but with more depth than one usually sees in this genre. The premise is familiar, the plot recognizable, but what makes this story more than a cop drama is the art.

Lloyd's art grabs the story and lifts it out of its genre and smacks it around with multifaceted techniques, cinematic perspective, and brilliant brush strokes. Some panels were literally breathtaking. His use of color is skillfully applied in order to pound primal emotional responses when the action heats up and softer, even humorous, touches when the story calls for it. The color and technique lay a vivid foundation beneath the story itself that works subliminally to magnify reader involvement with the text, and even more powerfully when there is no text at all.

Unlike a text-only story, Lloyd's new graphic novel gives the reader a multidimensional experience that is best savored slowly and more than once in order to truly appreciate his considerable talents.

Ann Marie
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lady Vean on January 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Kickback, the most recent work by artist David Lloyd, whisks the viewer into the world of corruption and greed in this intense crime-noir thriller. Lloyd plays the roles of both artist and writer in this masterpiece, deftly weaving language and imagery to entice the audience to be an active participant, rather than a passive reader. The use of earth tones in monochrome in many passages conveys the grit of the city, as seen through the eyes of a disillusioned "bad cop." However, there is an underlying softness in Lloyd's illustrations, with occasional splashes of color subtly portraying visual puns and even the pathos of a particular character. As opposed to most Graphic Novel's harsh black outlines and garish colors, Lloyd masters light and shadow to give the impression of depth. With Kickback, David Lloyd truly comes of age.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Annaleise Ferreira on February 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover
David Lloyd's art is some of my favorite in comics today, partly because of a very subtle realism he brings to ever frame and partly because I'm drawn to work that used a lot of heavy shadows. Often figures and scenes will be completely dark except for a tiny bit of skillful highlighting which brings the whole thing into three dimensions. It's the kind of thing I'm trying to accomplish with my own art.

The story in Kickback is a bit too short, I think, but very dense, so it takes a few times reading it to get all the details. I wish it were longer because there's a lot in there that can be explored further. I really enjoyed it and I hope Mr. Lloyd decides to continue the story.
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Format: Hardcover
I grew up in the tradition of nice Arthur Conan Doyle stories and the Sherlock Holmes mythos.

I had fun with Arsène Lupin and the Countess of Cagliostro and Raffles and Rocambole.

But, now that I think of it, I am not really a big fan of most of the modern crime comics I've read... the usual crime story opening, stuff like: "The night's as hot as hell. It's a lousy room in a lousy part of a lousy town - I'm staring at a goddess. She's telling me she wants me. I'm not going to waste one more minute wondering how I've gotten this lucky" might bore me, unless the artwork is virtuoso enough. I enjoyed Frank Miller's SIN CITY, but some of that dialog, being read aloud, sounds somewhat silly. The stories are entertaining, true, but there is not much depth involved.

And probably that's why crime comics are considered "inferior" to crime prose novels. However, there is one notable exception: KICKBACK, written and drawn by David Lloyd, creator of V FOR VENDETTA!

The first words drift far away from the usual beginnings of a crime comic. And that's good. No lousy rooms, no lousy parts of a lousy town, just a talk about a dream: "Okay. I will tell you about it. I'm in a dark warehouse... at least., that's what it feels like... there's ironwork -- spears of metal -- all around me... I'm on a catwalk that's too narrow to turn around on, so I start to make my way along it in the direction I'm facing... ahead of me, it seems to grow narrower... I can't see to the end of it... then, as I move along it, I see someone coming towards me... I try to make out who it is, but there's a kind of mist...". I thought it was a great way to begin a crime novel. With the description of a dream that is also an essential part of the story in many ways.
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Format: Hardcover
So there I am reading David Lloyd's Kickback, suspicious that the proclaimer (kind of like a disclaimer, only in favor of a person instead of in opposition to them) of this book as a "crime noir thriller" from "the creator of V for Vendetta" was a little one-sided and maybe even pretentious. And I get even more leary as I'm reading and there's what seems to be a transparent narrative structure fueled with weak verbal complexity and, furthermore, half-hearted attempts at pictorial intricacies. But as I keep reading -- even in spite of myself, perhaps -- I am pleasantly surprised by the slow, controlled, and increasingly powerful use of the comics medium to tell what in its fullness becomes a well-wrought story with a moral that's not campy nor Right-wing religious nor didactic. David Lloyd has created a satisfying narrative that does two things effectively: 1) tells a great, action-packed police-procedural / crime story, and 2) makes challenging uses of the comic medium look easy. Kickback is the story of a guy named Joe who used to be a kid named Joey and how a significant part of his (once lost) past allows him to come full-circle (and back to what he believes in) during a police scandal / crisis. This is a nice addition to the noir comic genre; think of it as a thinking woman's / man's Sleeper or Criminal in a British context with higher expectations of its reader. (Which is not meant to cast aspersions on either of the other titles; I have every issue of both.) But behind Lloyd's story is the construction of a chain of images and metaphors for modern (post-modern, if you want) life, the most striking of which is the image of two breast-flesh eyes in the lenses of a pair of hovering glasses. It's an image as stunning as anything you'll find in Renee Magritte's work, and I salute Mr.Read more ›
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