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Kid A CD


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Audio CD, CD, October 3, 2000
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Radiohead is Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O'Brien, Philip Selway and Thom Yorke.

Radiohead's previous recordings have included 1993's Pablo Honey, 1995's The Bends, 1997's OK Computer (the tour for which was documented by the 1998 film Meeting People Is Easy), 2000's Kid A, 2001's Amnesiac, 2003's Hail To The Thief and In Rainbows, which was ... Read more in Amazon's Radiohead Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 3, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Parlophone
  • ASIN: B00004XONN
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,062 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,803 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Everything In Its Right Place
2. Kid A
3. The National Anthem
4. How To Disappear Completely
5. Treefingers
6. Optimistic
7. In Limbo
8. Idioteque
9. Morning Bell
10. Motion Picture Soundtrack

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

2000 release, the fourth album from the groundbreaking British Alt-Rock group. A commercial success worldwide, Kid A went platinum in its first week of release in the UK. Despite the lack of an official single or music video as publicity, Kid A became the first Radiohead release to debut at #1 in the United States. This success was credited variously to a unique marketing campaign, the early Internet leak of the album, and anticipation after the band's 1997 album, OK Computer.

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With every record, Radiohead jump off higher and higher cliffs, daring fans to take the plunge in their artistic feats of derring-do. The journey from that scratchy bit of raw guitar angst in "Creep" (from 1993's Pablo Honey) to any song on Kid A amounts to a high-wire act that few, if any, bands in popular music have ever attempted. It's hard to believe both records come from the same planet, much less the same band. Likewise, the grandiose, Pink Floyd-esque thematic scope of 1997's extraordinary OK Computer is nowhere to be found here. Quiet, contemplative, and less confrontational, it opens with a lack of bombast, as "Everything in Its Right Place" builds tension with ghostly voiceovers, a dry pulse, and a shadowy organ motif. That tension appears over and over on Kid A. On "How to Disappear Completely," the unsettled, atonal keyboard waxing in the background offsets the plaintive Thom Yorke vocal, and on "Idioteque," detached, inorganic rhythms make the melody's despondent aimlessness that much more nerve-racking. Throughout, Radiohead fearlessly explore dissonance and structure, melding twisted, Brian Eno-meets-Aphex Twin sonic landscapes with utter discontent in the world around them. They may sometimes overreach, letting artsy ambition prevent them from giving us the arena rock-god goodies. But their commitment to restless creativity also yields pleasures that don't fade but instead become more resonant upon repeated listenings. If OK Computer was rock's most relevant expression of millennial angst, Kid A is the opposite; it's the 21st century's first record that sounds like the future, barely caring what that Y2K fuss was all about and much more worried about what the hell we're all supposed to do now. --Matthew Cooke

Customer Reviews

I still enjoy listening to every song on this album.
Nox104
Eerie and beautiful come to mind when I think of Kid A. It is one of those albums that you call "an experience." This is not music, it's sonic art.
Beatle23
Fans and critics will no doubt continue to argue about whether OK Computer or Kid A is the best Radiohead album.
Seth M. Reeves

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

208 of 226 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD
In the year 2000, Radiohead ditched its former "real" rock sound for Pink-Floydian, electronic post-rock. The result was "Kid A," where they relearned everything they knew about music from scratch. Some people loved it. Some didn't get it, and felt it was "pretentious." But there's one undeniable thing -- this chilly, eerie collection is a marvelously complex piece of work.

An ominous keyboard melody and gibberish vocals open the album in "Everything In Its Right Place," sounding a bit like a possessed radio. Then the fuzz and hums kick in, adding a spacey dimension to an already strange melody. A drum melody kicks in in the title track, followed by the ghostly rock of "National Anthem" and unearthly lament of "How to Disappear Completely."

Another "real" rock song kicks in with the darkly desperate "Optimistic," flanked by a pair of softer, eerie songs. "Idioteque" throws all the rules out the window with sharp percussion backed by weird waves of sound and Thom Yorke's high vocals. And finally it ends on the same note it began -- a stately organ -- in the harp-accented "Motion Picture Soundtrack."

In a musical world where anything that has a guitar can be called "rock," it's difficult to find music that is really creative. It's even harder to find a band that is willing to take risks, and expand their art. But those things can be found in Radiohead, and the evidence is in "Kid A" -- whether listeners think it's a wild success or a pretentious failure, it has to be admitted that it takes guts to try out something this different.

Thom Yorke's vocals are often described as whiny, but they are suited to the music here.
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141 of 154 people found the following review helpful By Un Anglophile on November 10, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Radiohead is a group constantly in evolution, challenging it's listeners everytime by pushing the artistic envelope with every album. With "Pablo Honey," you had a band that was using friendly pop songs with the indie-grunge sound of the early '90s. "The Bends" took it a step further, with the exploration of the 'concept album,' emphasizing the keyboards more and using the beats and the guitars to truely start to create an atmosphere. "OK Computer" entered Roxy Music/Pink Floyd territory, exploring more of that mysterious spacey air with a cartload of heavy guitars. What set "OK Computer" apart from every other Radiohead album is that it brought about an overall theme through Yorke's vocals--slow, quiet desperation at an over-materialistic world where work was literally killing you.
But "Kid A" is entirely different, smoothed with techno groves that would make you think of Aphex Twin or Kraftwork, then covered with a sheet of Pink Floyd. But with the slow, almost sometimes quiet mood of the songs, Yorke and crew give you an entirely new message on this album--Surrender. The angst of "OK Computer" is gone forever, replaced with a sense of slow decay, not giving a damn about the world anymore.
Songs like "Everything in it's Right Place," gives you a good example, with simple electronic keyboards driving a continous note with little pause; Yorke's fractured vocals, saying "Everything...Everything...Everything..." cry out in muted sadness continuously, interupted by a record stopping and going, leaving him to sing out of tune terribly.
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243 of 275 people found the following review helpful By Mike London on May 10, 2004
Format: Audio CD
When Radiohead released the 2000 album KID A, many people were puzzled. There was hardly a guitar to be found on the whole album. Radiohead traded in the claustrophobic, dense melodicism of OK COMPUTER for a much more electronically twinged sound. People didn't know how to react. Some loved it. Others wished they'd return to the sound of 1997. I'm glad made KID A, though I do not believe it is a wholly successful album. KID A is self-consciously difficult and avant-garde, whereas OK COMPUTER never felt forced, but developed according to its own internal laws and rhythms.
The biggest problem with KID A is that, because OK COMPUTER proved to be one of the biggest records of the 1990s, a Gen X DARK SIDE OF THE MOON, Radiohead felt they had to come up with another genre shattering record. THE BENDS still held Radiohead in a pop status, albeit a very mature sounding pop band. With OK COMPUTER, they had been pushed over the brink, where the commercialism of music, a la Britney Spears, is regarded with scorn. In a word, they became one of the major bands in rock music producing worthwhile, lasting music. They graduated to elite status, where rock critics faun over them and college intellectuals, when speaking of current bands with as little distaste as they can muster, speak of a band called Radiohead that has a very intellectually stimulating record about a computer. This process begun as early as THE BENDS, for it is on that record, and the numerous B-Sides of that project (a full album in itself), that Radiohead proved themselves far above their peers. With OK COMPUTER, they cemented their reputation as a post-modern musical force to be reckoned with.
OK COMPUTER also established Radiohead as one of the best guitar-rock bands of the 1990s.
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What's the difference exactly?
Its packaged in a box-case and includes a live CD and a DVD of promo videos/live performances
Apr 25, 2011 by Quexos |  See all 2 posts
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