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Kids At Work: Lewis Hine And The Crusade Against Child Labor (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) School & Library Binding – March 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • School & Library Binding: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback (March 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0613070046
  • ISBN-13: 978-0613070041
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 10.2 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,775,281 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A schoolteacher turned investigative reporter, Lewis Hine (1874-1940) traveled the United States from 1908 to 1918, photographing some of the millions of underprivileged children who labored as a regular part of the work force. He emerged with an array of shocking pictures and stories--of a five-year-old shrimp picker in Mississippi; a four-year-old oyster shucker in Louisiana; boys and girls working in often dangerous conditions and for pitiful wages in mills, mines, sweatshops, fields and factories in every corner of the land. Exhausted, ragged, often filthy, their faces peek out from the 61 photos reproduced here, their testimony certain to move the reader. As always, Freedman ( Eleanor Roosevelt ) does an outstanding job of integrating historical photographs with meticulously researched and highly readable prose, this time combining biographical information about Hine with a history of the campaign to end child labor in America. The result is thoroughly absorbing, and even those who normally shy away from nonfiction will find themselves caught up in this seamless account. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5 Up-Using the photographer's work throughout, Freedman provides a documentary account of child labor in America during the early 1900s and the role Lewis Hine played in the crusade against it. He offers a look at the man behind the camera, his involvement with the National Child Labor Committee, and the dangers he faced trying to document unjust labor conditions. Solemn-faced children, some as young as three years old, are shown tending looms in cotton mills or coated with coal dust in the arresting photos that accompany the explanations of the economics and industries of the time. Both Freedman's words and quotes from Hine add impact to the photos, explaining to contemporary children the risky or fatiguing tasks depicted. Details such as Hine's way of determining children's height by measuring them against his own coat buttons add further depth and a personal touch to the already eloquent statements made by his thoughtfully composed black-and-white portraits. Also included are some of the photographer's other projects throughout his career. Readers will not only come to appreciate the impact of his groundbreaking work, but will also learn how one man dedicated and developed his skill and talents to bring about social reform.
Susan Knorr, Milwaukee Public Library, WI
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Russell Freedman received the Newbery Medal for LINCOLN: A PHOTOBIOGRAPHY. He is also the recipient of three Newbery Honors, a National Humanities Medal, the Sibert Medal, the Orbis Pictus Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, and was selected to give the 2006 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Mr. Freedman lives in New York City and travels widely to research his books.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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The book was very good and fun to read.
Alice Levine
The book was written to shine light on child labor history and to showcase some of Mr. Hine's photographs.
Elyse Palmer
As far as audio CDs go, they are often only as good as the reader.
olivegrove

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Alyssa A. Lappen TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
...
This book weaves Hine's story together with his photographs of kids working in Maine's sardine canneries, Texas cotton fields, New York laundries, Tennessee and Georgia cotton mills and in textile mills all over the U.S. south. He took some of the most haunting photos of dark tunnels and grimy breaker rooms in Pennsylvania coalmines. He went inside glass factories, to farms, and onto city streets at 1 a.m. to photograph children distributing newspapers and 1 p.m. to watch them shining boots.
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If your kids occasionally gripe that they have it tough, get them this book and show them what the word means. Alyssa A. Lappen
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
Children and adults are both intrigued by this wonderful photo documentation of the history of immigrant children working in the United States. Lewis Hine's pictures tell the story and Russell Freedman's words add a greater depth to this sometimes sad yet beautiful celebration of children at work during the early 20th century.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
"Kids At Work" is a great book to tell and show the children of today how hard it was back then. Lewis Hine takes most of the credit. Thanks to his great photos The Declaration Of Dependence was passed. It stated that kids would be dependent and should live a normal kids life. Which concisted of going to school, being able to play freely with other kids ect.. We the children of today thank Lewis Hine for giving us a free life. I also give Ressell Freedman credit for following Mr. Hine and writing this spectacular and amizing book. As far as I am concerned Hine and Freedman greatest authors of all time!!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Elyse Palmer on May 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a nonfiction photographic essay book that will touch any reader's heart. Mr. Freedman seems to know the facts and life of Mr. Hine very well. There is an extensive bibliography at the end of the book as wee. The information at the end seemed hard to believe but true. The book is only 11 years old so the facts aren't that dated. There are many saddening facts in this book. It reveals the truths about child labor in the text and photos.

The book was written to shine light on child labor history and to showcase some of Mr. Hine's photographs. The book is very interesting to read. There are quotes from some kids who worked in the factories and also some quotes from Mr. Hine who took great pride in accurately recording the facts about his subjects. This book could spark an interest in further study of this topic.

The information in this book is broken down and presented in an understandable order. The text is a harsh reality but it is presented well. The style gets the reader emotionally involved. The language is relatively simple and easy to read.

The information is laid out well and the references are listed in the back. There is a table of contents and bibliography and acknowledgement page.

The photos are a wonderful enhancement. The book would be nothing with out them. They are strategically placed and make the book what it is. There are captions that describe the pictures and they are discussed in the text.

This book could be used in the classroom to show what life was like and to talk about immigration and economic conditions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mom Of Many Munchkins on August 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
I found and bought this book at the Goodwill and thought it would be nice for looking at the photographs, since we like to look at real historical photos in our homeschool. Well, I decided to start reading the book and couldn't put it down. It didn't take long to finish it and I really enjoyed it. It was a real eye-opener. How interesting that Hines had to sneak around and often hide in order to get his photographs. He might tell a shop owner that he needed a photograph of a machine, but then asked the child worker to stand next to it so people could see the large size of the machine. Of course, he was really showcasing the child who had to run the machine. He knew exactly how many inches from the ground each button on his vest was, so a child could stand next to him and he could quickly tell how tall they were. When most of the photos in the book were taken, there were over 2 million American children younger than 16 who worked 12 or more hours a day, 6 days a week, for pitiful wages under unhealthy and hazardous conditions.

My youngest child is 5 and many of the photos were of children the same age, and younger, working in places like cotton fields or in spinner factories, many with bare feet. What a tragic life these children had, most not living very long. How would you like to work in a glass factory with the temperature in the building 100 - 130 degrees? The molten glass they worked with was 3,133 degrees! These glassblower assistants made about 65 cents a day; a pretty good wage back then. But, because it was so hazardous and unhealthy in the glass houses, these assistants usually didn't live past the age of 42 (I just turned 42 this year!).
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Megan Deperro on October 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
As a little girl this book was one of my favorites. It also changed my life. When I grew up I knew because of this book I'd want to be a photographer and help the poor.
I know am a photographer and an inner city teacher along with working with street kids.

The black and whites in this photo I still study. They are mouth dropping!
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