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Kids Like Me in China Hardcover – November 1, 2001


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Kids Like Me in China + At Home in This World, A China Adoption Story + Found in China
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Hardcover: 44 pages
  • Publisher: Yeong & Yeong Book Company; First edition, second printing (stated) edition (November 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0963847260
  • ISBN-13: 978-0963847263
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #374,985 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

An inspiration for all adopted children to tell what they think and feel about the early chapters of their lives. -- Jane Brown, MSW, adoption educator

How marvelous that in telling their own stories children can embrace their connections to many layers of people and places. -- Sara Dorow, author of When You Were Born in China

Kids Like Me in China [is] quite simply tremendously important. -- Gail Steinberg, co-author of Inside Transracial Adoption

Ms. Fry writes with such delight and keen observation, you feel like you are visiting the orphanage with her. -- Rose Lewis, author of I Love You Like Crazy Cakes

On the difficult issues..., she combines a thoughtful, informed understanding with a kid's straightforward approach. --Kay Johnson, professor of Asian studies and politics at Hampshire College

From the Inside Flap

"Ms. Fry writes with such delight and keen observation, you feel like you are visiting the orphanage with her. Every adopted child will love to read this book again and again. It is their story too."
--Rose Lewis, author of I Love You Like Crazy Cakes

"How marvelous that in telling their own stories children can embrace their connections to many layers of people and places. Kids Like Me in China paves the way for parents and children to explore the layers of their own histories and identities. It is a playful, thoughtful and refreshingly accessible story."
--Sara Dorow, author of When You Were Born in China

"Now that our kids are getting older, they need to hear the voices of their peers, not just adults, as they figure out where they came from and why. Ying Ying is the first child adopted from China to tell her own story, and she does it very well indeed. On the difficult issues of abandonment and why one finds so many girls in Chinese orphanages, she combines a thoughtful, informed understanding with a kid's straightforward approach to explain clearly what parents so often struggle to discuss with their kids. This will be a great book for the China adoption community."
--Kay Johnson, professor of Asian studies and politics at Hampshire College and co-author of "Infant Abandonment and Adoption in China"

"We don't have to wait until children are adults to help them tell their own life stories. Kids Like Me in China is an inspiration for all adopted children to begin to tell us what they think and feel about the early chapters of their lives."
--Jane Brown, MSW, adoption educator

"Kids Like Me in China [is] quite simply tremendously important . . ., must reading for everyone eager to understand some of the deepest issues of adoption: connecting, belonging, and identity."
--Gail Steinberg, co-author of Inside Transracial Adoption


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Customer Reviews

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This book is extremely well written and serves as an important resource for adoptive parents and their children.
Katy Robinson
Personally, I got the added delight of discovering that author Ying Ying Fry is from the same part of China as my own daughter!!
Nancey Jurisch
My (...) daughter was immediately taken with the book, and spent a long time paging through it, looking at the pictures.
Terry Roberts

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Katy Robinson on October 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As an adult Korean adoptee and the author of a memoir about my own adoption experience, I was excited to read "Kids Like Me In China." This book is extremely well written and serves as an important resource for adoptive parents and their children. I only wish a book such as this one would have been available when I was a child growing up in Salt Lake City - often feeling like I was the only Asian and the only adopted person in the whole world. How wonderful that today's children can hear about the adoption experience - told with warmth, curiosity and honesty - from one of their peers, as well as see their faces reflected in the beautiful photographs throughout the book.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mirim Kim on June 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I love--abosutely LOVE--Ying Ying Fry's book _Kids Like Me in China--because she addresses (actually quite sophisticated and complex) arguments of adoption research in a personal way, such as saying that sometimes she wondered what it would be like to grow up in an orphanage with the other children, and sometimes when she saw all the babies in the orphanage she had to leave the room. She didn't say (her mother, the editor/transcriber, and her publisher didn't force her to say) that she went back to China, saw the poor starving children, and now feels lucky to be an American-adopted kid. I love how her narrative opens up spaces for other adopted kids to say--yeah, so what if I DID grow up in an orphanage? The woman Ying Ying meets in the book is a part-time model. That's hardly the half-naked, groveling, uneducated street beggar I was told I'd be without the "fortune" of being adopted. When I read Ying Ying's book, I felt so proud of her as a little-sister-adoptee. The vow that I made last year, that I will dedicate my life to better the lives of other adoptees, is a little bit easier to keep knowing that others out there--even a young elementary-school child--are able to take steps in that direction. I lack Ying Ying's language proficiency and connections/background of adoptive parents, but so do many other adoptees. I don't want to speak for adoptees at large. I want to assert the right to tell my story, and in telling my story I want to simultaneously break down the white, male, non-adoptee gaze that assimilates and twists my story to further its own socio-political agenda, and I want to--as Ying Ying has done--set my story out there as an example for other kids. We adoptees have few models. When I read Ying Ying's story, I could both identify with her and say, "that was different for me." The process really helped me to clarify what I wanted to say, and it also encouraged me--that if Ying Ying could do it, so can I.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Terry Roberts on October 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The book is very reminiscent of "When You Were Born in China." It's hardback, has lots of big pictures on every page, and has a relatively small amount of text. The big difference is that the pictures are in bright color. My (...) daughter was immediately taken with the book, and spent a long time paging through it, looking at the pictures. With me reading it to her, it takes about 30-45 minutes to read this book, without stopping to talk about the pictures much.
The pictures are mostly of kids (all ages) and caregivers at the Changsha orphanage, where Ying Ying, the 8-year-old author, is from. The orphanage is in good shape: it has new cribs for the babies, bright new clothes for all the kids, etc. But there are lots and lots of those cribs to a room, and the text talks about how busy the ayis are, taking care of all the kids. There are frank pictures of special needs kids. There are also pictures of older kids at school (mostly giving performances, rather than
sitting at desks). And there are pictures at a kid's home, which could pass as an American home, complete with laptop computer.
The text is upbeat, articulate, and frank. It's told from Ying Ying's point of view, in a child's "voice." She focuses on the positives in things, while explicitly acknowledging the negatives. Some quotes: "I was really excited and also a little scared." "I don't think the Ayis ever stop working. They hardly ever sit down." "Sometimes I think about [my birthmother]. But I don't talk about it much. Sometimes I just looked at all those babies in all those cribs and I didn't know what to think. Sometimes I just had to leave the room." "Sometimes when my parents were in another part of the orphanage, I'd go to my friends' rooms to play. It was different without my parents there.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Knutson on October 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is priceless. It is written by an 8 year old girl, Ying Ying Fry, who is adopted from China. It is her story of going back to her orphanage in ChangSha, China to see and talk to kids in the orphange and learn about their life. My daughter is also adopted from ChangSha so this story held even more meaning. The words are Ying Ying's and they are powerful in her observations. The pictures of the children and of life in general in China also fill in gaps of what her life may have been like. This is a perfect gift for your child from China. We will treasure it for its glimpse it gave us of life in China. Thank you Ying Ying!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I've already read "Kids" with my daughter nearly a dozen times and we'll no doubt read (and talk about it) it again and again and again. It's touching, enlightening, and really fun to see China through Ying Ying's eyes. It's also wonderful that the book is not just her story, but clearly one that could belong to any kid from China. Having read only parents' accounts so far, I'm also really, really pleased to get the perspectives of a child, For me, it's all about the kids, and it's clear that they can be every bit as eloquent in telling their own stories in their own words. This book should dispel all doubts that kids are capable of making sense of their complex stories. "Kids" doesn't gloss over the hard stuff, but has it all just right in just the right amount of detail. I love it for the hard stuff and I love it for the fun stuff. We get the fun stuff through Ying Ying's ability to converse in Mandarin, which simply gives her (and us) access to the ordinary in China: other kids' lives, schools, and homes. My daughter is just drinking this in and I can't get enough of it. Great story, great pictures, great book!
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