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  • Kikkoman - Aji-Mirin (Sweet Cooking Rice Wine) 10 Oz.
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Kikkoman - Aji-Mirin (Sweet Cooking Rice Wine) 10 Oz.


Price: $7.49 ($7.49 / bottle) & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Sold by Asian Store and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • Mirin, or sweet cooking rice wine, brings out the flavor in Japanese (and many Asian) dishes
  • Add a little to dishes such as teriyaki, sukiyaki, and tempura for a delicious, traditional flavor!
  • Alcohol contents 8% by volume
  • Also available in 17 Oz. bottle
  • Net Wt. 10 Fl. Oz (300 mL) - plastic bottle
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Important Information

Ingredients
Corn syrup, water, alcohol, rice, salt. Alcohol contents 8% by volume. Salted and Seasoned.

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Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. Please see our full disclaimer below.

Product Description

Aji Mirin brings out the flavor in Teriyaki, Sukiyaki, Tempura and other Japanese delicacies. This sweet tasting rice wine adds a slightly sweet, rich flavor to meats when used as a marinade or glaze.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 1 x 1 inches ; 10.1 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B0002YB20Q
  • UPC: 011152021409
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,386 in Grocery & Gourmet Food (See Top 100 in Grocery & Gourmet Food)
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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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See all 18 customer reviews
I tried this and it was awful!
J Fenton
Mirin uses the same fungus to produce the unfermented sugars that sweeten this essential Japanese cooking wine.
Micah R. Sisk
Makes an absolutely great cabbage slaw.
S. L. Montag

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Micah R. Sisk on April 4, 2011
Kikkoman mirin is probably what's called mirin-fu chomiryo (literally mirin-like seasoning). It's certainly not hon mirin (true mirin). If you look at the ingredients list, you'll see a big give away: Rice, Water, **Corn Syrup**, Alcohol, Salt. I'm not even sure this is made with rice wine. It's got rice and (a very little) alcohol in it, but it's sweetened with corn syrup. That's not mirin.

Real mirin is sweetened by rice that has been subjected to the Aspergillus oryzae fungus, which breaks down the rice starches into sugar. It's what's used in the production of sake. Mirin uses the same fungus to produce the unfermented sugars that sweeten this essential Japanese cooking wine.

If you're looking for the real thing, go to an Asian market and check the labels. Anything with sugar or corn syrup in it isn't authentic. Eden Foods also makes a widely available and very good mirin made from organic brown rice, rice koji (Aspergillus oryzae), pure water and sea salt.

(The salt in mirin sold in the US is not authentic either, it's added to calssify the wine as cooking wine, thereby avoiding alcohol taxes).

Do yourself a favor, read the labels and opt for authenticity. You won't regret it.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Peter Shallard - The Shrink for Entrepreneurs on June 13, 2013
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I made the mistake of not checking the reviews or ingredients for this product - thinking is a quick off-the-shelf commodity purchase. Turns out it's completely fake - not real rice wine at all. It's got glucose and corn syrup added.

Tastes and smells awful.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Zack Davisson HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 22, 2008
Mirin and Soy Sauce. That is all you really need for authentic Japanese cooking. And you need it everywhere. Those two liquids are the foundation for almost all recipes, and are used in some quantity in every dish. I do a considerable amount of Japanese cooking, and running out of mirin sends me into panic mode and heading out to the store.

Don't be fooled into thinking that "teriyaki sauce" has anything with Japanese cuisine. Purely an American invention, true teriyaki cooking is a combination of mirin and soy sauce, based on the meat or vegetables which are then slowly cooked, rotating sides until they become a delicious brown sticky mess. It is sooo much better than the fast food restaurants try to pass off as "Japanese teriyaki".

When it comes to brands, it is hard to go wrong with Kikkoman. For both mirin and soy sauce, they put out a consistently good product that you can count on to enhance your cooking. There are probably more refined and expensive brands out there, but Kikkoman does me just fine, as it does for the millions of Japanese households where it sees daily use.

As a sweetened wine, mirin adds flavor as well as nutrients to a dish, and can even be used as a sugar substitute in some recipes for those trying to escape from refined white sugar. Check out Japanese Foods That Heal for an in-depth discussion on mirin's health benefits and uses.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Harusami on October 11, 2013
I was raised on Kikkoman mirin and after going gluten-free and organic I was shocked to read the label to find that this is corn syrup and alcohol, not real mirin! After finding authentic mirin from Mitoku I can definitely taste the difference in the recipes handed down from my mom. I'll never go back to fake, unhealthy mirin again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J Fenton on October 2, 2013
I tried this and it was awful! Read the ingredients, which I erred in not doing when I bought it... who would have thought to look?! It's wine, right? But not so... glucose water... extremely sweet, not the flavor you expect at all in Mirin cooking rice wine... a total cheat on the part of Kikkoman and totally lowered my respect for this brand in general for their misleading labeling.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By roadkingpi on February 26, 2013
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This is NOT real rice wine. It is not even close. Don't bother with this garbage.it will add nothing to your recipient.spend a little more and get the good stuff. I poured this down the toilet.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Smith on August 31, 2013
Up Front: I did not buy this product on Amazon but still wanted to let people know. I purchased a 17 oz. bottle of Kikkoman Aji-Mirin last night at a supermarket for $4.99. I tasted it when I got home. Wasn't too impressed. I think I'd prefer using my rice wine vinegar and adding a little sugar to it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Krista Groll on June 17, 2013
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This product is entirely too salty. It should be called "Salty Cooking Rice Wine". I haven't used it in my recipes yet, but it will take some adjustment to compensate for all the salt.
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