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Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot Hardcover – October 2, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; First Edition edition (October 2, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805096668
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805096668
  • ASIN: 0805096663
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6,047 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Immersively written . . .  Mr. O’Reilly and Mr. Dugard succeed in investing a familiar national tragedy with fresh anguish. . . A powerful historical précis." —Janet Maslin, The New York Times

"All the suspense and drama of a popular thriller."—Husna Haq, The Christian Science Monitor

About the Author

Bill O'Reilly is the anchor of The O'Reilly Factor, the highest-rated cable news show in the country. He also writes a syndicated newspaper column and is the author of several number-one bestselling books.

Martin Dugard is the New York Times bestselling author of several books of history. His book Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone has been adapted into a History Channel special. He lives in Southern California with his wife and three sons.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
4,106
4 star
1,100
3 star
394
2 star
172
1 star
275
See all 6,047 customer reviews
The book was very well researched and written.
Durley D. Imbler
We all read Bill O'Reilly's book, Killing Lincoln and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Anne W. Kirkendall
This book is a book that one cannot put down once you start reading.
Eunice M. LaSpisa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2,507 of 3,126 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mullins on October 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was working in downtown Washington, D.C. on November 22,1963, the day John F. Kennedy was killed. A few days later, I stood at Pennsylvania Avenue in bright November sunshine and watched an unforgettable funeral procession. A team of white horses pulled a two wheeled artillery cart carrying JKF's flag-draped casket, followed by a black, saddled but riderless horse. Boots, placed reversed, were in the stirrups. An unhurried, muffled drumbeat accompanied the inexpressible sensation of grief that pervaded the cool air. There was collective anguish for the man, of course, but also grief because it seemed our country would never be the same. What I am about to write is not a political rant. Rather, it concerns the ever-lengthening shadow that continues to be cast to this day by the unthinkable events of November 22, 1963.

I still have a copy of the Life magazine that came out just a few days after the assassination. An article in Life stated that the President had turned toward the School Book Depository, which explained the entrance wound that the Parkland doctors had discovered in his throat. Later this was corrected by the FBI, and we were told the Texas doctors were wrong about the entrance wound, it was an exit wound. By December 3rd a story was "leaked" to the press stating that J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI had already determined that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone assassin. This information seemed to calm the distraught nation. Almost a year later, the Warren Commission Report was published. It was hailed by the mainstream media with virtually universal praise, although its supporting 26 volumes of evidence (with a supplementary FBI report) would not be published for another two months. I believe I am one of the very few people who ever read the 888 page Warren Commission Report.
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243 of 309 people found the following review helpful By Connie on October 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I am a huge Bill O'Reilly fan, and read his book, Killing Lincoln three times. It was excellent, and I purchased numerous copies for gifts. I could hardly wait for, Killing Kennedy, because I am a huge Kennedy fan, and have an impressive personal library on Kennedy, his presidency, and the assassination.

One of the recent books I read was Mary's Mosaic by Peter Janney, published April 2, 2012. The reviews for this book indicate that the author finally answers some key questions regarding the assassination, after years of painstaking research and interviews, and that he may have well solved Washington's most famous unsolved murder. I thought that with Bill's No Spin reputation, surely, his book would go even deeper in answering so many unanswered questions.

After reading, Killing Kennedy, I am of the opinion that Mr. O'Reilly and Mr. Dugan did not engage in "years of painstaking research and interviews," but simply regurgitated the same old government spin from 50 years ago. Is Mr. O'Reilly unaware that, contrary to the Warren Commission, the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that the Kennedy assassination was probably the result of a conspiracy, and found both the original FBI investigation and the Warren Commission Report to be seriously flawed? Is he unaware that even the Kennedy family believed that there was a conspiracy?

When polls conducted from 1966 to 2004 found that as many as 80 percent of Americans have suspected that there was a plot or cover-up, I am dumbfounded that someone as astute as O'Reilly would author such a book. And, more disturbing, is the thought that this book, like Killing Lincoln, will end up as required reading for American students.
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127 of 162 people found the following review helpful By Daniel B. Gallup on November 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
O'Reilly and Dugard write a riveting narrative interweaving the lives of President Kennedy, his brother Robert, Lee Harvey Oswald and Johnson and all the important people and events surrounding the Kennedy presidency. As an historical narrative, the reader is drawn closer and closer to the day of the assassination and follows the lives and events of the period involving the two principals, John Kennedy and Oswald, as the horrible day draws near. The narrative proceeds in a manner which would indicate the authors have a strong control of the facts of both the personal lives of the two men but also of the events of the era.

Then we come to the assassination itself. According to the authors, Oswald is already at 12:14 p.m. standing at the sixth-floor window holding his rifle diagonally across his body. Shooting standing up, Oswald fires three shots, two of which hit the President -- one in the "back of his lower neck" and another "travels all the way through the brain and out the front of the skull." Kennedy's hand reflexively goes to the top of his head. "But now the top of his head is gone."

The plausibility of their narrative of Oswald-- their interpretation of his life, his motives and particularly his actions that day, in fact depend on the accuracy of their claims of the nature of the President's wounding, and it is here that neither author has done his homework. The two best sources we have for the actual nature of the President's wounds as first viewed would be the depositions of the Parkland doctors and nurses, their contemporaneous notes, and the earliest interviews of them, the latter of which are found in David Lifton's Best Evidence.
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