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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another rock solid John Rain novel
Eisler's talents continue to shine in this newest novel about John Rain: He writes what he knows about, and he does it well.

In this latest novel, John Rain runs around Hong Kong, Manila, and Thailand searching for his latest victim - an Israeli explosives expert under the protection of the CIA. Who better to create an "accidental" death than John Rain. It's...
Published on June 28, 2005 by therosen

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good decent thriller
Barry Eisler's 'Killing Rain' is a good serviceable thriller. This is part of a series. It opens with established characters and story line. It ends with not one but two possible sequels. I've read the first two books in the Rain series before. I thought they were good also. I dont think any character I have come across gets closer to Lee Child's Reacher than this Rain...
Published on November 11, 2010 by clifford


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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another rock solid John Rain novel, June 28, 2005
By 
therosen "therosen" (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Eisler's talents continue to shine in this newest novel about John Rain: He writes what he knows about, and he does it well.

In this latest novel, John Rain runs around Hong Kong, Manila, and Thailand searching for his latest victim - an Israeli explosives expert under the protection of the CIA. Who better to create an "accidental" death than John Rain. It's a busy ride, where the hunter and hunted are ambiguous, elusive loyalties are tested and you never know what turn is coming next. The climax is strong, but leaves you breathlessly waiting for the next one. (More Caffiene for Mr. Eisler - one a year is a fast pace, but we'd like them even quicker!)

Similar to previous books in the series, you'll finish this one within a day or two of buying it. (I picked it up at a signing on Friday and finished it by the following Monday) It's just too hard to put down.

One suggestion for the reader is to start with book one (Rain Fall) if you're really interested in the series. You can read this one standalone, but the history of Rain as well as the context of his personal changes play out over multiple novels. This is not as purely episodic as the James Bond series.

I really hope someone acts on the option to put this series on the big screen. Beat Takeshi - are you listening???
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eisler's John Rain remains compelling, July 21, 2005
Barry Eisler in creating John Rain has invented an assasin, a hit-man for hire, who thinks, who broods. Rain, the offspring of a Japanese father and American mother is a contemporary samurai who continually muses over his chosen career as a very high-priced, meticulous assassin. Rain has what many might consider "problems," such as lack of a permanent love interest and so on. In "Killing Rain," the fourth in the John Rain series, aging becomes another of his concerns.

Through a intermediary, a gorgeous Israeli intelligence agent who specializes in seduction to serve her country, Rain is hired to kill an Israeli who sells knowledge of explosives to terrorists. Rain has acquired a sort-of partner, known as Dox (as in "unorthodox"), a large, verbose American. Dox's specialty is as a sniper.

The two track down the target, Manny, to Manilla and in Rain's typically painstaking (and thrilling way) set the scene for his demise. The ambush goes wrong and among the dead are two men who might be CIA agents. Rain's concern for Manny's young son is what makes the assination go wrong. Rain has scruples: he isn't just anyone's murderer.

The beauty of reading Eisler is that he takes you into the very complex mind of John Rain and some of the people he interacts with. Their is Deliah, the beautiful Israel agent. Dox who appears to be superficial, but is not. Even with minor characters, Eisler manages to evoke depth in them.

The action moves from the Phillipines to China and is unrelenting. Now Rain and Dox are being hunted by the Israelis and a mysterious organization that may or may not be connected to the CIA.

It never stops. Eisler keeps pouring it on and Rain keeps thinking and thinking. And the reader keeps reading and reading until long into the night, unless they have a self-discipline I lack.

Eisler has created a grand character in John Rain, the assassin who thinks . . . and kills with mind-gripping perfection.

Jerry
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Killing Rain is one killer book!, June 23, 2005
For those searching for a little more action in their reading diet, you could do no better than Barry Eisler's Killing Rain (Putnam, $24.95), the fourth in a series featuring Japanese-American assassin John Rain, a contract killer who specializes in the "natural causes" hit.

Rain is hired by the Mossad to eliminate an Israeli arms dealer operating in Manila. At the crucial moment, though, the target's young son appears on the scene, causing Rain to freeze. The arms merchant escapes and Rain's hesitation haunts him, his conscience plaguing him for the first time with self-doubt.

After three action-packed adventures, culminating in last year's stand-out Rain Storm, Eisler has taken his latest book in a slightly different direction, focusing less on the adrenaline, and more on the psyche of John Rain. The result is a more introspective and deeply nuanced story, and a richer look into the heart and mind of this compelling killer.

Even given that change of focus, Killing Rain still features plenty of thrills and tense moments, as well as the beautifully rendered exotic settings that have become the series' trademark. All in all, Killing Rain is a satisfying step forward for one of the genre's most gifted writers.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Eisler Winner, August 30, 2005
By 
Brkat (Southeast, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Shadow assassin-for-hire John Rain is again doing what he does best. This time, at the behest of the Mossad, he is off through Southeast Asia stalking black market arms dealer Manheim Levi. By now longtime Rain devotees are as familiar with his modus operandi and his obsession for detail as they are with author Barry Eisler's taut, crisp and compelling penmanship. None of this subtracts one iota from this being another terrific John Rain novel. Sensual femme fatale Delilah returns as does Rain's alter-ego associate Dox. The trio makes for an unorthodox but effective (and entertaining) team as they pursue the completion of their assignment. A slightly different slant in this fourth novel.

I will echo previous reviewers' lament that, after reading "Killing Rain" so quickly, it seems a long wait until Eisler writes the fifth Rain novel next year. But enjoy this one for now, it's another great read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read!, November 30, 2005
By 
D. Levy (Del Mar, California) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have to admit that I bought this book because I had the pleasure of working with Barry many years ago just after he left government service and I was curious to see what he had come up with in John Rain. I'm a huge fan of Trevanian (old ones, like Shibumi, not the recent ones that are written by someone else) and I must say that I was really impressed. Killing Rain is a great read and a must-have for followers of the genre! I opened the book and didn't stop until the adventure came to an end. Barry's description of the locales, characters and techniques are colorful, entertaining and spot on. I look forward to the next in the series.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Winner From Eisler!, December 5, 2005
By 
Melvin Hunt (Cleveland,, Texas United States) - See all my reviews
This fourth book of the John Rain is another outstanding book.

Eisler has sucessfully made a professional assassin into a hero.

In this new book Rain is once again hired to perform an assassination.Thanks to a reccomendation from his female friend

Delilah a Mossad agent Rain is hired to eliminate an enemy of

Israel.He is hired for the job by Gil and Boaz,Mossad agents.The

target is Manheim Lavi(Manny)an Israeli bombmaker who is selling his knowledge of building bombs to various terrorist groups.

Rain teams up with his new pardner Dox and goes to Manila to assassinate Manny.They find him in a restroom in a restaurant but his son enters the picture.Rain ends up killing Manny's

bodyguard and two CIA agents.

At a meeting of the Mossad Delilah is given the assigment of killing Rain by the director of Mossad because of the botched

assassination of Manny.The action then moves to Hong Kong to the

China Club where Jim Hilger(rogue CIA agent) Manny, and a new villain Ali Al-Jib( a nuclear scientist gone bad) are meeting.

You have another gun battle between John Rain and Delilah pitted

against the forces of evil.There is a surprise at the ending.

This is another excellent book by Barry Eisler.Be sure to read it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars John R. Schill is a moron, August 30, 2005
By 
Ritz (Atlanta, GA) - See all my reviews
First off, can someone out there delete that Schill guy's review? It has nothing to do with Killing Rain and I don't see how a book review is the appropriate forum to whine about politics... Seriously, Schill, get a life... oh, and by the way, I'm not even a Bush supporter, you're just universally annoying.

Now, as far as Killing Rain is concerned, this book is very well done. John Rain is a more in-depth, multi-dimensional and conflicted protagonist than I've seen in any international murder/suspense/intrigue thriller in a long time.

You should definitely read these books in sequence, as the character development is significant, not just for Rain but for the side characters as well, and it helps to understand both Rain's professional and romantic history to truly enjoy this book.

Nevertheless, this is a fine edition to the series and I'm looking forward to number five.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is There Any Redemption For Someone Who Is A Killer-For-Hire?, August 19, 2014
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"Redemption Games" (formerly "Killing Rain" and "One Last Kill") is the fourth novel in Eisler's eight-novel strong John Rain series. Rain is a Japanese-American professional assassin, who has lived in both countries and feels at home in both. Formerly of the Japanese Secret Service, he is now operating as a private contractor, often with a partner Dox. Sometimes he works with the CIA or Mossad. Sometimes he is at cross-purposes with these agencies. Although there have been many secret agent and assassin type novels over the years, the Rain series is among the best well-written and the first few novels were filled with an insider's view of Tokyo and the environs that really took the reader inside Japanese culture. These novels also contain numerous passages giving the readers informative tips about how to assess a dangerous situation, what to look for when you walk into a hotel, an airport lounge, a restaurant, how best to quickly dispose of enemy combatants.

This novel takes Rain to Manila, Bangkok, and Hong Kong. He is working with a partner, Dox, an ex-US Army sniper with a good-old boy manner, loud and abrasive, living large every minute, but who somehow, when he goes into sniper mode, disappears into the woodwork. Rain got a referral for this job through his Mossad contact and sometime-lover, the blonde bombshell Delilah and part of the story, particularly after the job goes sour, is whether he can trust her and whether he can ever let down his guard around her. Often, their goals are similar, but she has allegiances that he ultimately does not have.

Rain is not your typical assassin (as if you know what a typical assassin is like). He has morals and ethics and qualms about killing in front of children, but he is deadly as they come, preferring to work close up and there are few professionals in an agency that are of his caliber. "Killing isn't the hard part," he explains. "Getting close to the target, though, that takes some talent." As does making it look natural, his speciality. The hardest part, however, is living with it after.

There are few secret agent type novels (and, although, Rain isn't a secret agent, the stories are part of that genre) that are this well-written and this accessible. Rain isn't casual about what he does as Bond might be. Rather, everything he does has consequences, largely because he is operating on his own and anything he does might offend an agency, seal his death warrant, or screw up a personal relationship for him. The meat of this book is not just bang-bang, shoot-em-up, but Rain's paradoxical difficulties with dealing with what he does and who he can trust. And, it is a book (or series of books) that really stands out in this genre.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good decent thriller, November 11, 2010
Barry Eisler's 'Killing Rain' is a good serviceable thriller. This is part of a series. It opens with established characters and story line. It ends with not one but two possible sequels. I've read the first two books in the Rain series before. I thought they were good also. I dont think any character I have come across gets closer to Lee Child's Reacher than this Rain series. So if you like Child, your going to like Eisler.

This time, John Rain is partnered up with Dox, a big hulking sniper. Dox plays off Rain as a comedic side kick/best friend. He is an enjoyable character and highlights the best of Eisler's writing ability. I felt like I was dealing with two distinct personalities. This isn't something that every author does, and Eisler does it well.

Rain and Dox are hired to take out a bad guy who sells his services to nefarious terrorists. It turns out that this explosives expert is working under the guidance of the CIA, or at least under the guidance of an operative Rain has come across before. The hit goes wrong and the next couple of hundred pages deal with Rain and Dox trying to clean things up.

I am in the great minority here in only giving this story 3 stars. I'm impressed that Eisler continuously gets close to a 5 star average book after book. I would have to agree that Eisler deserves the accolades he is receiving for his story telling. He has a nice way of pushing the story line along. However, just judging "killing rain" by itself, as a story outside of the series, its nothing special. Rain has already been pretty much fully developed in previous stories. I also feel like Rain is just too good of a person. He is like a white knight, only one who has killed hundreds of people for profit. Rain is not twisted or conflicted like a 'Dexter' character, instead Eisler crafts him as an innocent. Eisler makes him out to be the 'everyman' character so popular today (see Harlan Coben). I just don't buy it. I see a huge clash between job description and character outline.

I also despise the neat formulaic manner in which Eisler has laid out this plot inside of his larger series. I felt that this story was terribly empty. I would applaud Eisler if he ended this series and worked on something new. I know he wont. But it would be nice if he did. People here on Amazon are saying "man, I wish this were turned into a movie". This feels like Die Hard 4 or Leathal Weapon 4. You are getting the same old same old.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The hardest part of killing is living with it after.", July 9, 2005
"Killing Rain" is Barry Eisler's newest entry in the extremely popular John Rain series. Rain is a Japanese-American freelance assassin with a conscience; he will not kill women, children, or non-principals. He specializes in making his hits look natural or accidental when the situation warrants it. This time around, Rain is hired by two Israelis to take out Manheim Lavi, an Israeli national who has sold his bomb-making expertise to terrorists all over the world. Although Rain has traditionally worked alone, he now has a partner, a former Marine sniper and comrade in arms named Dox. Dox is a Southerner with a wicked sense of humor, who loosens up the normally severe Rain.

When Rain's attack on Lavi fails spectacularly, the Israelis are furious, and they fear political reprisals against their country. Rain himself becomes a target for assassination, and he soon reunites with Delilah, a sultry Israeli spy and former lover. However, Rain is not sure that he can trust Delilah, whose loyalties are divided. Will she sell Rain out to her Israeli bosses or will she use her considerable skills to help him elude capture?

"Killing Rain" is a wonderfully entertaining follow-up to the three previous John Rain novels. Eisler constantly shows his characters developing and changing, and he emphasizes not just their fighting skills, but also their humanity and vulnerability. When Rain is about to kill a man, and the man's son suddenly appears on the scene, Rain is paralyzed with indecision. He cannot bear that a child will become fatherless because of his actions. Rain's failure to carry out the hit puts a crimp in his reputation, and he has to struggle to prove himself still capable of doing the job.

One of the most compelling aspects of Eisler's novels is the spycraft. Eisler includes detailed and fascinating descriptions of how Rain conducts and eludes surveillance, plants and makes use of listening and video devices to keep tabs on a target, and even fools hotel employees into unwittingly revealing confidential information. In addition, the author takes full advantage of his exotic locales, which include Bangkok, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and the Philippines. He makes each place come alive with colorful accounts of the its atmosphere, architecture, and cuisine.

Eisler's plot is deliciously complex and suspenseful, and the action scenes are nicely choreographed. There is so much to like about "Killing Rain," but I am especially impressed with Eisler's grasp of the terrifyingly irrational world in which we live--a place where people sell their souls for money and power, zealots routinely kill innocent people, and governments act against their own best interests.

John Rain is not an easy man to categorize; he is both a hero and an antihero. Rain can ruthlessly kill someone instantly with his bare hands, and he also has the cunning to outthink his most devious opponents. However, he is having difficulty "bearing up under the weight" of what he has done. Rain has given up a great deal for his profession--a family, a home, and peace of mind. He has also learned the hard way that trust and compassion are rare commodities, and when he trusts someone or allows himself to care for another human being, he does so with great reluctance. As Eisler shows in this superb novel, Rain is beginning to realize that the price he is paying for the life he leads may be too high.
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