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Kimchee Days, Or, Stoned-Cold Warriors Paperback – March 15, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: THE OLIVER ARTS AND OPEN PRESS (March 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981989144
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981989143
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,264,361 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Tim Gatto was born in 1950 in New York, and grew up in the Cold War era. Idealistically, he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1968, though the Vietnam War soon began shaping and changing his ideas about American foreign policy, much as it for most of his generation.While still serving, he joined the protest against the Vietnam War, and later, after witnessing the fraudulent run-up to the Iraq War engineered by the Bush administration, he again became politically active. He lives in South Carolina, a liberal independent in one of the reddest states in America.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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I read it cover to cover non-stop!
Matthew Cuerdon
Good read, I even let the ex know about the book so he could read it.
Sascha
This is the true picture of that momentous time.
Randall M. Tillotson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Cuerdon on March 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
I first read Kimchee Days back in 2000 before it was published. I read it cover to cover non-stop! And have re-read it several times. I laughed. I cried. I cheered! It felt like home to me.

In a time when super-power rivalries defined the direction of nations and the destiny of America's youth, KIMCHEE DAYS takes us into the Cold War of 1970's South Korea at a time of coming of age for a crew of young American Cold Warriors manning Foxtrot Battery, one of America's most advanced anti-aircraft missile system. It is a modern voyage into our ancient souls, into our very essence on which we embark, it is M*A*S*H with nuclear tipped missiles, SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER in combat fatigues, with a touch of COLD WAR reality to keep you from putting it down.

I hope that you enjoy it as much as I have.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hammer on April 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I served at "E" Battery which was the most southern nike missle site in Korea. I was there in 1967 & 1968. While stationed there The Satus Of Forces Agreement was enacted and the USN ship Pueblo was captured. That said I couldn't believe how much had changed at the sites from 68 until the 70's. The seemingly total disregard for authority be it from nco's or officers I found to be a bit over the top, and the percieved daily use of pot and pills was something I never experienced. I know that in our battery rank was not much of an issue off duty, but on duty it would have been somebodys Nads on the table if someone acted in the manner described. The exploits of the main character in the story, both on and off duty reminded me more of stories told by a recruit just home From basic, than that of a seasoned vet. I'm sure that life for an off duty serviceman stationed near a large city like Inchon was much different than what we experienced in the "one road through it village" we knew. We had three small clubs that held maybe 50 people,crude would be an understatement. Entertainment was supplied by a couple of speakers and a turntable that spun the latest bootleg copies of the current hits. There were ladies that would cater to the needs of those who needed and lots of beer and booze to supply a lifetime of memories. There were some very belieable instances, in the book that certainly brought me a smile and peaked some memories. I wasn'nt there in the 70's so I cant'say that it wasn't that way , it just wasn't that way at Echo Battery in 67 & 68. I know the book was written as as fiction based on life at a nike site in the 70's, but as a nike crewman at sites in Korea, Florida, and Germany it just didn't depict what I experienced. I did enjoyed reading the book , just couldn't wrap myself around it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By BLUE INDY on May 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
"The light above him clanged red and the BCO reported, "Red status, battle stations!" "Patty was stunned! There had to be a mistake. The B scope showed them what the BCO was looking at..." "He could see the north-south border. On the south side he saw two or three targets. The north side had about two hundred!" -all headed south.

In a book noted for its humor, I found this incident the most CHILLING. A routine drill known as "Blazing Skies" had just morphed into a potential nightmare that could have started a North -South Korean "hot" war and perhaps warmed up a chilled Cold War into World War 3. And so was life in the Nike Hercules antiaircraft batteries in the 1970's near the DMZ. As a veteran whose sole experience of the Cold War was state side, this was all new territory to me, and I found it fasicinating!

The trials, tribulations and "free enterprise" opportunities of a young, new recruit are spelled out in graphic detail in Tim Gatto's EXCELLENT book, "KIMCHEE DAYS or Stoned-cold Warriors" a fictionalized account of the author's - and others - experiences on the front lines of the Cold War. Populated by a cast of weird characters and with Gatto's usual sparse, no fluff or frills writing style, "KIMCHEE DAYS" is Tim Gatto at his finest -and leaves the reader hungry for more - much more. From the officious First Shirt to the highly admirable guard dog Fred and his fine "taste" in Commanding Officers, I promise the book will please and delight the discriminating reader of historical fiction.

And really, like so many others, I want to know... What became of FRED?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert D. Abernethy on September 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I started out in Nike-Herc but switched over to Hawk Missiles. Spent 13 months in Korea....six months just outside of Inchon and 6 months south of Soule. So much of this book rings true of what it was like over there during the early/mid 70s for both Herc and Hawk including the going to battle stations fairly often. One thing that is missing is that a battery was given "resume fire" but failed to do so. The lieutenant and company commander were relieved in less than an hour.

I very good read as well as being entertaining while being most factual...one thing thought is that the "black market" was not as open and many were caught.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sascha on April 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Loved the book. I visited Foxtrot Battery 1977. My husband had been stationed there and when they moved him over to Camp Humphreys I went over and lived in the village outside that base. I still have pics of my ex sitting on top of the nike Hercules warhead missiles and Foxtrot Battery. Most people had no idea of what Korea was like. You described it quite well.
Good read, I even let the ex know about the book so he could read it.
Lainnie
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