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Kinda Christianity: A Generous, Fair, Organic, Free-Range Guide to Authentic Realness Paperback – April 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 62 pages
  • Publisher: Gut Check Press (April 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615364977
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615364971
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.1 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,591,293 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ted Kluck is the author of several books, on topics ranging from Mike Tyson to the Emergent Church. Both Why We're Not Emergent and Why We Love the Church (with Kevin DeYoung) won Christianity Today Book of the Year awards, and Paper Tiger: One Athlete's Journey to the Underbelly of Pro Football won a Michigan Notable Book award in 2008. His work has also appeared in ESPN the Magazine and Christianity Today. Ted has played professional indoor football, coached high school football, trained as a professional wrestler, served as a missionary, and taught writing courses at the college level. He lives in Grand Ledge, MI with his wife Kristin and sons Tristan and Maxim. He once owned a used Volvo and currently has a boxing ring in his basement. For more information, visit www.tedkluck.com Zach Bartels is a totally non-revolutionary, plodding, six-line Greco-Roman imperialist who gets his salary and social status from the old way of reading the Bible. He spends most of his time trying to worm his way into the pages of Ted Kluck books. (In this, he has been quite successful). He loves gourmet coffee and listens to NPR. Zach lives in Lansing, Michigan with his wife Erin and son Calvin. You can find his blog and homepage at www.pastorzach.com.

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Customer Reviews

To Ted and Zach, HA HA HA HA HA!
Julie G
Others that have reviewed have done a much better job, so I'll just leave you with this--it's a good, fun, easy-to-read book that will have you laughing.
K. Noble
When reading this, I was laughing so hard I that I actually cried tears of red Kool-Aid.
Brad Atchison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By EyeDR on August 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is (obviously) a satire. For those of us who have been brought up in the Christian community and have been beat down by other Christians for upholding biblical truths, this book will bring laughter to a very tiring and terrible situation. This book is not meant to be ridicule the emergent/emerging conversation/church, just provide something to laugh about for those of us who find this movement to be a serious problem. I have personally taken part in many conversations or sat in emergent churches and listened to them make jokes about my point of view. And there are endless written comments mocking what I believe in emergent writings. So, to anyone out there who's heart breaks over this misguided movement, take the time to read this book and laugh a little over it. GREAT JOB to the authors!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Julie G on May 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
To Ted and Zach,

HA HA HA HA HA!

That is the sound of me, enjoying your book. So much so that I kept interrupting myself to read bits to my husband.

You seem to have met someone we know... in fact, I think you've pictured him on page 21, except he's usually sporting a Shane Claiborne-esque bandana, rather than a baseball hat. And you've described him right down to the tattoo, the bizarre and random similes, the blog name in Greek, and the t-shirt. Though he wears Mao, not Che Guevara. If you were from the PNW you might have used him for raw material. But as you're not, it's just that much funnier.

Well done.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David P. Craig TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was born in the 1960's and wasn't old enough or "smart" enough to enjoy the original airing of the satirical show "Get Smart." Get Smart was a successful spoof on two very popular and successful icons of the time - James Bond and the Peter Sellers character - Inspector Clouseau. Don Adams playing secret agent 86 was both dashing and fumbling and played the role perfectly. I have the whole Get Smart series on DVD and when I am in dire need of a good laugh - I break out a season and watch a few episodes with my teens - who love Get Smart as much (or more) than I do.

This book is a satire on representatives of the emergent movement largely represented by Brian McLaren and his book "A New Kind of Christianity." Much like aficionados or critics of the show "Get Smart" - you are either going to love or hate this little book. If you take James Bond, Inspector Clouseau, Brian McLaren, or those of his ilk too seriously - you will really hate this book! Well if that's you - and I knew who you were - I'd pray that you would lighten up and learn to laugh at yourself and your heroes.

For those of you who believe in absolute truth, calling a spade a spade, and actually take a stand for something, instead of being continually banal and vague - you will love this book and laugh a lot!

My only critique of the book was that it was too short. However, like episodes of "Get Smart" - I have noticed that as much as I love watching these shows - the reality of the satires and the truths we laugh about are too serious to only make fun of.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brad Atchison on November 4, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In an era where Christian and satire are often thought to be antithetical, Kluck and Bartels bury that caveman notion. This too hot to handle masterpiece is a heart-wrenching story about youthful kids who want to be white Che Guerra's in a world that has way too many young, white Che Guerra's. They blog, they over-indulge and divulge their feelings at the local fair trade coffee shop, they hate words like prop*sition and d*trine and make sure people know how much they care for injustice without really doing something about it.

Ted and Zach make sure to make you laugh at the all too true generalizations of Po-mo Christianity. They start with addressing the need for proper attire in their Po-mo make over section. Then they move on to blog crafting and customization tips to make sure you attract all the other armchair revolutionaries. After that, they put bulls-eyes on the enemies of Em*rg(ing, ent, ant, unt, etc.)Christianity just to make sure that you troll their blogs looking for fights. And lets not forget that they give you tips on how to scout out your perfect epicenter/atrium of worship. No, not church, epicenter; you heard me right.

When reading this, I was laughing so hard I that I actually cried tears of red Kool-Aid. Then I saw the picture of Don "The Joker" Carson. I think my laughter leveled up so much that my appendix ruptured which lead to a near but funny death. This is a must read for anyone who is no one and wants to be someone. Anything that Flozell Adams recommends should be read, and trust me, he recommends this one. If you don't buy this, he will crush you. Not only that, but these authors are so awesome that they should both be Carl Weathers. Who wouldn't want to read a book by not one but two Carl Weathers?
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Pete Scribner on May 12, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you don't like satire or you count yourself as a big fan of Brian McLaren and the Emergent Church movement, you probably won't particularly like the maiden voyage of Gut Check Press. If you'd like to get a theologically astute, deep and incisive critique of McLaren's A New Kind of Christianity, again, this book might not be the first place to go.

But if you would like to read a more light-hearted (though still incisive) critique of McLaren and all things Emergent, then Kinda Christianity is definitely for you. It's sub-title bills it as "A generous, fair, organic, free-range guide to authentic realness." One can only assume that "relevant" and transparent" simply didn't fit on the cover.

The authors freely admit that this short book is not intended to really encourage anyone. Rather it is solely meant to make people laugh. It's satire definitely accomplishes this goal for the anti-Emergent reader, ultimately answering the question, "What would Christianity look like if we were all college sophomores?"
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