Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 251-275 of 302 posts in this discussion
Posted on May 23, 2012 8:44:04 AM PDT
I will never pay more for a kindle version than the paperback price. I will never pay more than $10 for any kindle book, period.

Posted on May 29, 2012 5:02:58 AM PDT
Same here, no kindle books unless the price is significantly lower otherwise i will rather have the physical book. Also, FWIW, Amazon haven't address this issue for 3 years (first post 2009), don't think the scenario will change anytime soon, if it will ever be.

Posted on May 29, 2012 7:53:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 29, 2012 7:55:24 AM PDT
I'm OK with the market dictating the price, although I probably won't buy much until the prices come down to $5. But there's two things that bother me. First is you can't lend your copy or sell your copy to someone else like you can with a book. This makes it less valuable to me (but more valuable to the publisher). Second is that most ebooks I've seen are the exact same price no matter who is selling them. I don't know if that's part of the Apple collusion thing or just that it's legal for wholesalers to set prices that their customers (retailers) must sell at. I thought that years ago Congress had made that illegal (fair trade or restraint of trade), but I guess it's not now. Until that changes, competition will suffer.

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2012 8:53:40 AM PDT
Sharron says:
I totally agree. the Kindle charges are ridiculous considering it's a cybersend with no paper. I've just looked at at book I want. A new paperback is $9:10, a used one is 5.73 and the Kindle version is $13.63!!!! So guess what? I'm being driven back to hold-in-my-hands books, which I loved anyway. Yo Amazon people? If you want to drive your business, you need to make it worth our while in price, not only convenience. Signed: Sharron Pearce, Cape Town

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2012 8:54:21 AM PDT
Sharron says:
I totally agree. the Kindle charges are ridiculous considering it's a cybersend with no paper. I've just looked at at book I want. A new paperback is $9:10, a used one is 5.73 and the Kindle version is $13.63!!!! So guess what? I'm being driven back to hold-in-my-hands books, which I loved anyway. Yo Amazon people? If you want to drive your business, you need to make it worth our while in price, not only convenience. Signed: Sharron Pearce, Cape Town

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2012 8:56:10 AM PDT
Sharron says:
Well if it's the publisher's driving these prices, they are the ones who need to wake up. What? Do they think they've found a gravy train and we're all idiots who NEED to read on Kindles? Duh. I've started going to my local library, where I can get books magazines, dvds and cds. Sharron

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2012 8:58:27 AM PDT
Sharron says:
Yes, that's another problem. If either my husband or I download a book, we also have to negotiate and borrow the other's kindle in order to read a book he'd normally have passed to me when he'd finished. I'm beginning to think this whole thing is bogus and not needed. Yah for charity. Yah for books. Sharron (Hey Amazonions, are you READING here????)

Posted on May 29, 2012 9:18:06 AM PDT
After some Googling, it appears that good 'ol Apple is the culprit here. They colluded with 5 large publishing houses to set high prices precisely so they wouldn't have to compete with Amazon. They forced Amazon and other retailers to sign so-called "Agency model " contracts that set prices or they would not sell to them. The publishers were happy to go along because they were concerned that Amazon was driving down prices and gaining too much power. Apple then had no price competition and kept 30% of the selling price.

The agency model is not illegal per se, but colluding to fix prices is. The Justice dept is apparently investigating and close to a settlement. We'll see then if Amazon and others can set their own retail prices.

Posted on May 29, 2012 10:16:47 AM PDT
Sharron says:
ha! that makes sense. But in the meantime, they are losing customers, readers, buyers. short term thinking, assuming we're idiots. big mistake. bad marketing. greed. tsk tsk tsk.

Posted on May 29, 2012 9:02:05 PM PDT
Scooby says:
I was in the store today and looked at two books on the shelf, pulled out my phone and checked out the Kindle price for the same books because I'd rather have the kindle version. Each of the Kindle versions was around $2 more than the paperbacks on the shelf. If the publishers don't start pricing Kindle books and paperbacks the same, I'm going to just go back to using the library and buying nothing. I wonder how much money the industry would lose in a few months if everyone boycotted and did the same.

Posted on May 30, 2012 12:20:37 AM PDT
Sharron says:
Exactly!!!

Posted on Jun 3, 2012 4:40:19 PM PDT
Kelly Li says:
I'm seeing no hope in dropping the ebook prices and I've already stopped purchasing any ebooks from Amazon. Publishers are greedy, screw them!

Posted on Jun 5, 2012 4:36:27 AM PDT
Well, Amazon seems to be getting away by stating "This price was set by the publisher" on Kindle edition of the books. But, now that DoJ has challenged the legality of the Agency model, let's see how it unfolds.

FWIW, A recent analysis of the on-going debate, http://j.mp/LkSHfj

Posted on Jun 11, 2012 10:02:55 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 10:05:32 AM PDT
BarbieKP says:
I am glad I bought the cheepest version of Kindle. The price they charge for kindle books is stupid and I simply will not buy any ever. And I am sure I will never buy another kendle. They have lost a customer in me there.
I do use my kendle for public domaine books there is alot I haven't read so it not a complete waste. You can usually find the PDF format of old books and crop and convert them to the kindle format

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 6:58:10 AM PDT
B. Mitchell says:
I get tips on free Amazon books from the Zero Dollar Books website. http://hundredzeros.com/ They add new books every week or two. It saves having to search Amazon for free reads.

I must admit to actually having paid for a Kindle book after reading a free offering from an author that I particularly enjoyed, but my "pain threshold" is under 3 bucks.

Do give the website a look - theres a ton of free books for Kindle on Amazon and it's a shame that you're missing out on them.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 7:21:57 AM PDT
It actually is legal for the publishers to dictate retail prices, but it will be interesting to see if the ones that settled with the DOJ will allow their customers to set their own prices. Seems that's how it should be.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 7:29:51 AM PDT
I'll give zero dollar books a try, though I suspect it's pretty limited in terms of good or recent fiction which I like. Also try overdrive. They contract with local libraries and offer downloadable audio and books, for free. Some are in kindle format, some in adobe ebub or PDF format.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 7:34:05 AM PDT
B. Mitchell says:
I'm in Canada, so I can't borrow books from the public library yet. I'm sure it's coming.

One thing I noticed with Zero Dollar Books is that the website tries to customize offerings to your past choices. I've chosen courtroom suspense type novels and I seem to be offered more of that genre than others.

Another thing I've learned is to take the Amazon ratings with a grain of salt. If there are only four reviews, you can bet that it's the author's family and friends. When you start getting over 20 or 30 reviews, they tend to be more "real". Now I usually don't waste my time on books that only have a handful of reviews.

Posted on Jun 14, 2012 6:43:57 AM PDT
David Boyd says:
Well you would have thought publishers would learn from previous industry mistakes? Ripping off customers in such a fashion that everyone knows you are doing it will result in mass piracy of books, the same as happened for films and music CDs. I just hope we don't hear the whining from publishers when the inevitable occurs. Be fair to your customers and they will be fair to you. Blatantly rip them off and they will do likewise.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 14, 2012 7:49:16 AM PDT
David, I agree, not to mention just avoiding them. Books are not as popular as music with young people but I'm sure there's already schemes to decode and change formats to read books on a non DRM reader. Yesterday I was looking for a sci fi book but what I wasn't willing to pay $14 for it on Amazon so I settled for a different title downloaded from my local library. If it'd been $5 AND I could lend it, sure I'd buy it. Plus the publisher would likely make as much profit.

Posted on Jun 14, 2012 8:39:51 AM PDT
R. Mcintire says:
I ran into it again, and try post a review critical of the kindle price--reject, violated Amazon's guidelines. Here it is:

1.0 out of 5 stars Lack of Ethics: Kindle version cost more than the paperback., June 6, 2012
By R. ****
****

This review is from: Xenocide (Ender, Book 3) (Mass Market Paperback)
In my quest to highlight the ethics of Amazon, publishers like Tor Books, and the authors involved, I'm not buying this book, until the Kindle version is less. Or I'll buy it used. No printing, no delivery, no associated distributing costs, in addition to saving natural resources, and they charge more. Unconscionable.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 20, 2012 8:42:02 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 20, 2012 8:42:26 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012 8:54:33 AM PDT
Two reasons.

1. There's probably some concern over digital products creating more piracy, but if anything the sellers are probably losing more from physical books that can be more easily passed around and resold endlessly at used book stores.

2. Amazon is selling kindles at a loss and making up for it on the price of the book. It's the same as getting your cell phone subsidized and paying for it on your monthly cell phone bill.

3. Because they can. Plain and simple, it's quite clear that people love the benefits of digital books and are willing to pay the price. While there may be a large population complaining about the cost, there's an even larger population quietly buying more and more books. Trust me, they've run the numbers on this and decided this was the optimal price. If they thought they could sell enough books at a lower price to make up for the loss in profit on each book, they would do it.

Posted on Jun 22, 2012 9:01:14 AM PDT
JR, I agree with point number three, with one exception. According to the articles on the DOJ investigation, the publishers compelled Amazon (and B&N, Apple, etc) to sign a contract stipulating a set retail price, IE they could "not" offer a lower price even if they wanted to. Apparently this is legal, though not the colluding with other publishers (not to mention the instigator, Apple) to do so. Failure to sign the contract meant they would not have access to the books, period.

If/when the publishers sell the licensing rights to retailers without the so-called agency model stipulations, then we'll see what the retailers decide to sell for.

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 12:24:40 AM PDT
L. Davis says:
I just found out about this nonsense. Could somebody from either Amazon or the publishers explain why is the Kindle version more expensive than the paperback? Sales guru's get twitching! Amazon after pushing the virtues of eBooks to then charge more than a paper back when there is no additional costs i.e printing distribution etc, well guess what I'm going back to paperback. If a book is more expense on Kindle it will be the lesser cost of the two that will prevail.
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Participants:  209
Total posts:  302
Initial post:  Apr 11, 2009
Latest post:  Jan 11, 2014

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 38 customers

Search Customer Discussions
This discussion is about
Pride And Prejudice And Zombies
Pride And Prejudice And Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith (Paperback - 2009)
3.3 out of 5 stars   (773)