King Maker: The Knights of Breton Court, volume 1 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.99
  • Save: $0.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Fast shipping from Amazon, and unbeatable customer service. Amazon Prime customers get free 2-day shipping. Millions of satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

King Maker: The Knights of Breton Court, volume 1 Mass Market Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.19
$0.75 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

King Maker: The Knights of Breton Court, volume 1 + King's War: The Knights of Breton Court 3 + King's Justice: The Knights of Breton Court, volume 2
Price for all three: $21.57

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Series: The Knights of Breton Court (Book 1)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Angry Robot (September 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857660527
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857660527
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,832,240 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"There are fewer greater pleasures in a reader's life than witnessing a writer whose work they have enjoyed reached a new plateau in their storytelling skills, and such is the case here... Broaddus delivers in a voice that both whispers and roars and cannot be ignored." - Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Award-winner Gary A. Braunbeck

"Maurice Broaddus' writing creates a dangerous and authentic mood. The language is fierce and evokes the gritty realism of life on the streets... For some, King Maker is going to be the best read of 2010." - FantasyLiterature.com

"King Maker is a fascinating novel... [and] should be on every SF fan's shelf." - Adam Christopher

"Deft characterization, authentic dialogue, exciting plot... Maurice Broaddus has definitely brought his A-game to this urban joust." - Gene O'Neill

"King Maker's strength is its ability to stay true-to-life even when the fantasy components come into play..." - Nick Cato, Stem Shots

"It’s impossible to approach a new version of the timeless tale [of King Arthur] without asking, 'Do we really need this version?' I’m pleased to report that Maurice Broaddus provides many compelling answers to this question, answers which led me to conclude with a resounding 'yes.'" - The Sci-Fi Guys Book Review

About the Author

Maurice Broaddus holds a Bachelor's of Science degree from Purdue University in Biology (with an undeclared major in English) and comes from a family that includes several practicing obeah (think: Jamaican voodoo) people.

The author lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.  His areas of interests includes religious studies, folklore, and myths. His previous books was the novellas Orgy of Souls (written with Wrath James White) and Devil's Marionette. He's a senior writer for HollywoodJesus.com and his dark fiction has been published in numerous magazines, anthologies, and web sites, most recently including Dark Dreams II&III, Apex Magazine, Black Static, and Weird Tales Magazine.  He is the editor of the Dark Faith anthology. His novel series, The Knights of Breton Court (Angry Robot) debuts in 2010.  Visit his site at MauriceBroaddus.com.

More About the Author

Maurice Broaddus is an exotic dancer, trained in several forms of martial arts--often referred to as "the ghetto ninja"--and was voted the Indianapolis Dalai Lama. He's an award winning haberdasher and coined the word "acerbic". He graduated college at age 14 and high school at age 16. Not only is he credited with inventing the question mark, he unsuccessfully tried to launch a new number between seven and eight.

When not editing or writing, he is a champion curler and often impersonates Jack Bauer, but only in a French accent. He raises free range jackalopes with his wife and two sons ... when they are not solving murder mysteries.

The way he sees is, as a fiction writer, he's a professional liar. His dark fiction has been published in numerous magazines, anthologies, and web sites, most recently including Dark Dreams II&III, Apex Magazine, Black Static, and Weird Tales Magazine. He has two novellas, Orgy of Souls (co-written with Wrath James White, Apex Books) and Devil's Marionette (Shroud Books), and edited the anthology Dark Faith (with Jerry L. Gordon, Apex Books). His novel series, The Knights of Breton Court (Angry Robot/HarperCollins UK) debuts in 2010. Visit his site so he can bore you with details of all things him at www.MauriceBroaddus.com.

Customer Reviews

Can't wait to read the second book in the series!
apalestar
I enjoy well done remixes and extensions of classic tales, and with only a few exceptions, Maurice Broaddus has done that with the Arthur legends.
Dragonsept Family
The narrative follows many characters without making the reader care about any of them.
H. Pace

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michele Lee on December 5, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I bought this book.

King Arthur in modern day, gang-ridden Indianapolis, this book promises, and the Arthurian legend is evident in King Maker by Maurice Broaddus. The book opens with the short, dark tale of Luther, gang leader and father to an infant, King James White. Not long after betraying King's mother with another woman Luther is shot, betrayed by his right hand man.
With that, we're told in the tone of a Shakespearean tragedy, the story moves on to King, who is in fact the One True King (albeit rather far from England). Except that despite King's role as the lead he's actually in the book very little.
In fact that's where this whole book stalled for me. Broaddus can clearly write circles around other people, but in this book he writes in circles that have hollow middles. Almost all the focus is on character building, tension building and weaving in the minute details of the re-written mythos. But for a large part of the book nothing happens.
Also, Broaddus spends an exorbitant amount of time building up characters who are ultimately side characters. This leads to next to no connection with King himself and a sense of confusion when major events to happen, or major players are killed. Because the emphasis is on everyone being gray (all the bad guys have a reason for their bad, either playing a role or being crushed by a poor life) is so overwhelming that no one comes out as a compelling or valiant hero.
Fate and legend are powerful aspects of the tale, as is the desolation and hopelessness of life way below the poverty line. Not to mention the clever metamorphosis of fiends into zombies and the very interesting use of fae and otherworldly creatures in the most unusual of modern settings.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jodi Davis on February 10, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Always a sucker for Arthur Mythos - can't believe it's taken this long to get to the top of my read pile.

This book is gorgeous, in a dark and horrible way. It reads like a nightmare that is lush and decadent, while being set in squats and under bridges. Even those characters at the *top* of the hierarchy, live in conditions that most people wouldn't consider a basic standard of living.

I highly recommend this as a read that will shake you up a little and maybe pull you out of any comfort soon you might be in regarding Urban Fantasy.

I have some issues with the culture of the book and the relationship with women portrayed - It's hard out there for a ho... but it's not an issue with the writer - it's written beautifully - it's just that hard attitude and world view of the slice that is being written about really couldn't be portrayed any other way. Not and work or be realistic - but it is sort of depressing.

I have a lot of love for King, Lady G, Merle, Wayne - and a host of side characters that have relevant roles in the unfolding of the tale. Sometimes scenes jumped in a way that I had to figure out where I was - but I'm not sure if that was the formatting issue mentioned below or an authorial issue (or even just a me issue.)

Still gets a Bravo! from me as even with any *figurin* I might have had to do - still worth it. Can't wait to read Book 2.

Nit Picks:

The kindle edition I bought had some formatting problems that have been reported - so hopefully those get fixed - nothing major - some spacing issues that caused paragraphs with dialogue and end and beginning to get thrown together.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Sullivan on January 30, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The invisible baggage attached to King Maker Book One by Maurice Broaddus cannot be ignored. It's impossible to approach a new version of the timeless tale of King Arthur without asking, "Do we really need this version?" I'm pleased to report that Maurice Broaddus provides many compelling answers to this question, answers which led me to conclude with a resounding yes.

Broaddus sets his tale among the very real rundown slums of west-side Indianapolis. The homeless huddle under streets that Hoosier natives can point to on a map, but would rarely drive through by choice after dark. While reading this book, I've stumbled upon mixed online comments regarding this choice--why not New York or Los Angeles or some other, more recognizable ghetto? I applaud the decision, and not just because I recognize the area he writes about (and clearly, so does he). By refusing to relocate his tale, he reminds the reader that poverty knows no geography. The poor are as equally trapped in Los Angeles as Pittsburgh. To massacre Shakespeare: A gang shooting in any other city would be as dangerous.

With every sentence, Broaddus traps the reader in the slums with his characters. He paints a bleak picture of warring gang members born without a chance, stuck in a school system that's given up on them. We see kids raised by drug dealers and hookers whose only options are to escape through drugs or to "rise up" through the gang system, only to discover, too late, the lies inherent in those promises.

This is the world of King James White. We begin with the betrayal and fall of his father. Frm there, we're quickly introduced to the gang and residents of Breton Court and their rival, the crew at the Phoenix apartments.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa2ecbc30)