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King Solomons Mines


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Editorial Reviews

Fortune hunter Allan Quatermain teams up with a resourceful woman to help her find her missing father lost in the wilds of 1900s Africa while being pursued by hostile tribes and a rival German explorer.

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Product Details

  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004TTOLSA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #467,822 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Darren Harrison VINE VOICE on July 30, 2004
Format: DVD
Vastly superior to its rather lackluster sequel ALLAN QUATERMAIN AND THER LOST CITY OF GOLD (which was actually filmed back-to-back with this production), this entertaining and fun loving tribute (or some might say rip-off) of the Indiana Jones movies benefits (unlike its follow-up) by the sure hand and capable direction of veteran J. Lee Thompson (of the original GUNS OF NAVARONE) and a suberp supporting cast that includes the always entertaining and eminently watchable John Rhys-Davies and Herbert Lom as the two main villains, a Turkish slaver and a World War I era German Colonel respectively.

Based very loosely on the classic H. Rider Haggard adventure novel of the same name, this movie features Richard Chamberlain as adventurer Allan Quaterman who is recruited by the sexy and gorgeous Jessie Huston (played by a pre-famous Sharon Stone) to rescue her father who has fallen into the villains hands in attempt to locate the fabled King Solomon's mines.

What follows is a fast paced, fun and thoroughly entertaining adventure with some eye popping stunts and some truly cheesy special effects.

No matter though, this movie promises high adventure and entertaining escapism. Movie fans will have fun spotting references to other movies of the 1980s from the Indiana Jones adventures to 1983s FOOTLOOSE and that movies game of unintentional chicken.

I was one of the (evidently) few who actually made it to see this movie in the theaters on its release in 1985 and one who instantly picked it up on VHS. Of course when the DVD was released in February of this year I was there to instantly pick it up. Still fun after almost 20 years this DVD comes well recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By trebe TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 6, 2009
Format: DVD
Attempting to ride the wave of success created by Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), the good folks at the Cannon Group brought you King Solomon's Mine (1985), an action adventure featuring Richard Chamberlain as the renowned adventurer Allan Quartermain. Based on Henry Rider Haggard's novel published a century earlier in 1885, the character had been featured in films before, with Stewart Granger among those playing Allan Quartermain, who was supposedly one of the main inspirations for the character Indiana Jones.

According to legend, somewhere in Africa, a great treasure in diamonds is to be found in King Solomon's mine. Professor Jediah Huston (Bernard Archard), has been abducted by Colonel Bockner (Herbert Lom), the leader of a group of German troops seeking the treasure. John Rhys-Davis, who was also in Raiders of the Lost Ark, appears here as Dogati, a Turk aiding the Germans. Still mainly working in television, a pre-Basict Instinct Sharon Stone, plays Jesse, who has hired Quartermain to find her lost father.

In the 1980's, the Cannon Group was mostly known for action films, particularly those by Chuck Norris, and Charles Bronson's Death Wish sequels. Cannon's production of King Solomon's Mine features mostly non-stop action, as Quartermain and Jesse, get into and out of a string of tight situations, that includes an extended sequence on a train, a madcap encounter in the air, a rather silly incident in a giant cooking pot, and swinging over a pool of crocodiles. The abundance of action, makes the film seem longer than it is. At the time, Richard Chamberlain was pretty hot, coming from the success of the Thorn Birds. Minus the whip, and with a heavy beard, Chamberlain bears a resemblance to a certain Dr. Jones.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 17, 2008
Format: DVD
H. Rider Haggard's King Solomon's Mines is one of those stories where it often feels that only the title and the odd character name have been filmed. If there were a prize for the least faithful version, Cannon's 1985 romp would win hands down. Richard Chamberlain's Great White Hunter Allan Quatermain may be a reluctant guide on a quest for the fabled mines, but this time his only companion is Sharon Stone, eager to save her archaeologist father from Herbert Lom's dastardly and cartoonish Wagner-loving German officer (the plot has been updated to pre-WW1 Africa). No prizes for guessing that this is inspired more by Indiana Jones than H. Rider Haggard (it even co-stars John Rhys-Davies as another Arab, this time on the bad guys' side), with the stunts increasingly outrageous and the tone firmly tongue in cheek.

Shot almost back-to-back with the dire Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold and originally brandishing the how-are-they-ever-going-to-fit-that-on-the-marquees title Allan Quatermain and King Solomon's Mines and the Lost Caves of Death, it's a film almost as overloaded as it's rejected title: for the first half or so it's surprisingly entertaining, but eventually the relentless energy starts to wear you down as you realise that the film's used up most of its best stunts and jokes and is running out of clichés to rehash and lampoon. Certainly there's nothing in the second half to match a comic marketplace chase or a very silly train rescue that sees Quatermain work his way through variations of Indy's truck chase before skiing along the rails as he holds on by his bullwhip... In many ways, DVD is an almost ideal way to see it: a little too much to sit through in one go, a self-created intermission certainly helps.
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