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Kingdom Come: The Final Victory (Left Behind) Paperback – October 1, 2007


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Kingdom Come: The Final Victory (Left Behind) + Glorious Appearing: The End of Days (Left Behind) + Armageddon: The Cosmic Battle of the Ages (Left Behind)
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Product Details

  • Series: Left Behind
  • Paperback: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.; Reprint edition (October 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0842361901
  • ISBN-13: 978-0842361903
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (236 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #50,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jerry B. Jenkins, former Vice President for Publishing and currently Writer-at-Large for the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, is the author of more than 150 books, including the best-selling Left Behind series. Sixteen of his books have reached the New York Times best-seller list (seven in the number one spot) and have also appeared on the USA Today, Publisher's Weekly and Wall Street Journal best-seller lists.

Tim LaHaye is an internationally known author, teacher, and expert on Bible prophecy. He is married to Beverly, who is the founder of the largest women's organization in America, Concerned Women for America. The LaHayes live in southern California.


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Customer Reviews

AS, I have read the whole series, this is book, defiantly one that have to be read.
Queen
It's almost like they just wanted to get this book and series over and done with and, dare I say, the effort seems as though they are bored with the whole thing.
Rockhound
The narrative is awkward, the dialogue is stilted, the characters are stereotypes, and the plot suffered without a villain.
Kona

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

111 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Mark Baker HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The tribulation is over and the millennium is beginning. Christians who have died have returned to earth in their glorified state to help those Christians who are still alive rule the earth. The earth's population is made up entirely of adult Christians and children who haven't yet made up their mind.

There is a huge need to evangelize the children, so Chloe and Buck, both glorified, set up a day care. They children play games and learn Bible stories. Rayford, the only surviving member of the original Tribulation Force, reunites with old friends and works to further Christ's kingdom by doing whatever is needed. 100 years in, he leads a group that sets about revitalized Egypt after it is judged for turning from God.

But in the background, there is resistance building. Calling themselves The Other Light, they set about convincing unbelievers that, if enough of them believe, Satan can win when he is freed. Is there anything our heroes can do to stop them?

Okay, I'll admit I have had a love/hate relationship with these books. Some books I've loved, some I've hated, and some I've loved and hated. This book definitely falls into the hated category.

After some boring set up, we advance to almost the 100 year mark, where we spend almost the entire time. There really is no central villain to the story, which makes the conflict very weak. As with GLORIOUS APPEARING, there are long passages that are direct quotes from the Bible but do nothing to advance the story. And this includes three times they stop their story to tell us a Bible story quoted almost completely from the Bible. The characters seem even weaker then normal, too.

And that leaves out my biggest complaint.
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77 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Kona VINE VOICE on April 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The sixteenth book in the "Left Behind" series covers the one thousand years after the Glorious Appearing. Jesus reigns from the holy temple in Jerusalem, David is his prince, and peace prevails throughout the world. All adults in the world are either "naturals" (believers who were alive at the time of Jesus' coming), or "glorifieds" (those who returned to earth from Heaven), and will live out the Millennium and then proceed to heaven. Children (those under the age of 100) must make the choice to be followers of Christ, or die on their 100th birthday. The members of the Tribulation Force have a children's day care ministry which serves hundreds of children and aims to bring the youth to Christ. But there are pockets of dissent, even in this paradise. A growing number of hedonistic "children" are members of The Other Light, a group that rejects Christ and longs for the return of Satan.

I found this book poorly written and disappointing. The narrative is awkward, the dialogue is stilted, the characters are stereotypes, and the plot suffered without a villain. The authors admit there is scant scriptural information about the Millennium, so their detailed description of events come across as fantasy not grounded in prophesy. The first hundred years is described in excruciating detail, and then in one sentence, 900 years passes and it's time for everyone on earth to either ascend to heaven or descend to the lake of fire with Satan. The earlier "Glorious Appearing" was a good book that wrapped up the series for me; this book was shallow, dull, and pointless.
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By J. Simpson on April 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Like several of the books in this series, this should have been a chapter instead of the book. Long re-tellings of Hebrews 11, Noah, Joshua and David are used as filler, but add nothing to the development of the characters or the plot.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Brian Carnell on April 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have read the first 12 books in the Left Behind series multiple times. They are fantastic! The first books I ever read that I could not put down.

The prequels were boring.

This book is entertaining in parts, and sometimes interesting. But in the end, it's a big wasted oppurtunity. Why give the final battle only one chapter in the book? 95% of the book takes place about 100 years into the millenium. Why? The most important and interesting stuff is the final victory. Why not spend time on the huge army building up, instead of skimming over it in a few paragraphs? Not to mention cramming the final judgements and victory into a couple pages. Why skim over all the most interesting parts, but spend endless pages on Biblical characters telling their stories? And endless detailed description of life during the millenium? I really can't figure out what the point of the book was. I thought it would tbe about the final victory, as the cover says. But so little of the book is actually about the final victory.

I don't want to consider this the last book in the Left Behind series. It's more like a postquel (haha). This is a hard review to write because I just love the series. As bad as this book was, it can't change the first 12 books, which are simply amazing reads.
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful By The Red Aaron on April 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was unsure what to expect with the 16th and final book of the Left Behind series. Prequels never seem to be as good as the original, and the only prequel book I thought should have been written was "The Rapture." Still I was pleasantly surprised with this final book. I actually think they should have made a sequel trilogy of the melenial kingdom instead of a trilogy on pre-rapture. I loved the private story or Kenny and Kat and even tho they became the main characters, they included many of our favorites from the original series. They kept it exciting by making us doubt the loyalties of some of the main characters, but it's not overdone either. They also tackle some big and popular issues and questions people have with God. Such as, "If he is all powerful and all loving why do people still go to Hell and why doesn't he fix all of my problems." I loved that this book tackled such issues, and as Abdullah did, treated those asking with love and respect.

The one thing I didn't like with the book was the portrayal of Jesus. He just lives in the temple like an untouchable king and does not seem to have much interaction with believers. He quotes himself a lot from the Bible and when he isn't quoting himself, he talks in flowery language like he popped out of the NIV version of the 4 gospels. I understand if they did anything else people may think of it as sacrilegious, but Jesus was as relate able as possible 2,000 years ago, and I happen to think he will be exactly that same way during the Melenium. He is God but that doesn't mean he has to talk the such distinguished snob. I think Jesus will be one of the most relatble persons you'd ever meet, and I can't wait to meet him in person. But I hope he won't be as boring as he was in this book.
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