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Kingdom Come Paperback – March 1, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1936196029 ISBN-10: 1936196026 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 132 pages
  • Publisher: C&R Press; 1st edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936196026
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936196029
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #328,100 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Estes directs the Creative Writing Program at Malone University in Canton, Ohio, where he lives with his wife and sons. His poems and prose have appeared in Tin House, New Orleans Review, Southern Review, Iron Horse, AGNI and other journals. In addition to the poetry collection Kingdom Come (C&R Press, 2011), he is author of two chapbooks: Breakfast with Blake at the Laocoön (Finishing Line Press, 2007) and Swerve (Poetry Society of America, 2009), which was chosen by C. K. Williams for a National Chapbook Fellowship. For more about his work, see: johnestes.org.

More About the Author

John Estes directs the Creative Writing Program at Malone University in Canton, Ohio, where he lives with his wife and sons. His poems and prose have appeared in Tin House, New Orleans Review, Southern Review, Iron Horse, AGNI and other journals. In addition to the poetry collection Kingdom Come (C&R Press, 2011), he is author of two chapbooks: Breakfast with Blake at the Laocoön (Finishing Line Press, 2007) and Swerve (Poetry Society of America, 2009), which was chosen by C. K. Williams for a National Chapbook Fellowship. For more about his work, see: www.johnestes.org.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Glynn Young VINE VOICE on May 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
In 2009, poet John Estes published a chapbook entitled "Breakfast with Blake at the Lacoon," which effectively evoked a sense of both the literary and everyday reality. That same characteristic is true of his first collection of poems, Kingdom Come: Poems, published by CR Press, but even more so: Estes is refining his art, honing and polishing his poems to create a mirrored reflection of ourselves.

The poems are structured in four sections and an interlude: "in which love and art seek their measure;" "in which he marries;" "in which a child is conceived and born;" the interlude called "Home Cosmographies;" and "in which they seek the measure of art and love." This structure is important, suggesting both a circular movement and well as development and growth, a filling out of a life that is young and new and beginning to mature.

It's fascinating to see how Estes combines images and even realities, using each to highlight and frame the other. In "A List of What is Found," for example, he tells a story of traveling to Kansas to conduct an inventory of a bookstore, an inventory framed by an old train rail bed and which in turns frames what's on the news:

A List of What Is Found

The old Burlington
Northern rail bed touches
the southern edge
of the yard
not a hundred feet
from where we're staying--
a ghostly, trackless
river of gray gravel
embowered by cottonwood
and hedge, thickened
with pines and red cedar.
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