Kings & Thieves

November 6, 2012 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Some music from this album is free with
Join Amazon Prime
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:37
30
2
3:47
30
3
4:50
30
4
4:05
30
5
4:46
30
6
6:11
30
7
3:51
30
8
4:25
30
9
4:54
30
10
6:08
30
11
5:29

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 6, 2012
  • Label: Inside Out Music
  • Copyright: (c) 2012 Insideout Music
  • Total Length: 52:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B009P74EPQ
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,960 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

The rest of the album just isn't as good as those three tracks.
daknight
I hope that Geoff continues to release solo records and I'll continue to support him, but I'm just not a big fan of the Geoff Tate/Kelly Gray songwriting team.
Brian M. Patterson
Yes, Geoff is contantly struggling with his own singing, but the thing that really caught my attention was how poor the vocal melodies were.
Guymandude

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

168 of 191 people found the following review helpful By Samsara on November 6, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Geoff Tate was once considered one of the most gifted and legendary singers in hard rock and heavy metal music. But Tate has done the best he can to distance himself from those labels in recent years and his latest offering, Kings & Thieves shows why -- he can't (or won't) SING any longer.

Kings & Thieves is the third release in a row where Geoff's vocal performance is the weakest link. From American Soldier, to Dedicated to Chaos and now Kings & Thieves, the pattern is Tate's declining ability as a singer, even when presented with musical ideas that fit his more non-metal preferences.

He's found this fascination with speaking lyrics instead of singing, which in small doses is fine. But this record continues the trend even more. And when Tate does attempt to sing and hit a note, its often flat and strained -- showing the dramatic loss of range and control that he used to be revered for.

There shouldn't have been any excuses on this record for Tate. He paired himself up with long-time friends and former MYTH bandmates Kelly Gray and Randy Gane -- a writing team very loyal to him that's he's comfortable with. Perhaps that backfired...maybe those he trusts didn't have the guts to stand up and say "Geoff, you need to do better than this."

From a lyrical and melody perspective, Kings & Thieves is quite possibly the worst Geoff Tate has ever done. Sexually suggestive lyrics are ok in certain instances, but "Say U Love It" is downright atrocious. You're what, 53, Geoff? This is what you're going to sing about? Really?

Sadly, while the lyrics are terrible for a lot of this record, the vocal melodies are just as bad.
Read more ›
54 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Brian M. Patterson on November 6, 2012
Format: Audio CD
I received my copy of the new Geoff Tate album on Saturday, so I've had a few days to listen and let the new songs sink in. I also had the pleasure of seeing Geoff perform live on Halloween night last week, so many of the new songs are still fresh in my mind from that performance. Without going into a song-by-song detail I must say that I feel "Kings & Thieves" is a fairly bland album and not exactly what I had hoped for.

I enjoyed Geoff's first solo album in 2002, especially because it varied its music styles to include R & B, electronics, and an overall softer tone compared what he had previously done in Queensryche. To my surprise, this new solo album "Kings & Thieves" is much heavier and guitar-rock driven than I had expected. I will admit that I preferred his first solo album to some of the recent Queensryche releases because he explored other soundscapes and musical arrangements than that of basic mid-tempo guitar rock. Because of the expectations set by his first solo album I'm slightly feeling let down by his second solo record.

The best way that I can describe this album is is that its a continuation of the production and style found on Queensryche's 1999 album, Q2K. The songs on "Kings & Thieves" are very similar in structure and have Kelly Gray's fingerprints all over it. Kelly Gray was my least favorite Queensryche guitarist and I was not overly fond of the guitar sound and overall song quality on Q2K (and also the tour that followed), and this new Geoff Tate album sounds like a complete contiuation of that songwriting style. After hearing the album I wasn't surprised to look at the linear notes and see that Kelly Gray had mixing credit and songwriting credit on all but 2 of the songs.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 41 people found the following review helpful By BarnabyJones on November 9, 2012
Format: Audio CD
I didn't expect a Queensr˙che record-- all I expected was a half-way decent one and I was very disappointed.

The lyrical content of this record is atrocious and platitudinous, Geoff's voice is very tired, and the music is terribly bland. Gag-worthy cuts like "Say U Luv It", "In The Dirt", and "The Way I Roll" are nothing short of a disgrace to Geoff Tate's legacy, and an insult to most people's intelligence. Cringe-worthy and painfully idiotic lyrics like "She's got moves like I've never seen, rides me hard like an exercise machine" are sad reminders of where Geoff Tate is creatively. This is album is self-indulgent, contrived, and about as meaningful as the average pop record.

The music sounds like the same monotony from Dedicated to Chaos, but with a little more life. There are very brief flashes of brilliance, but it feels as if the musicians are holding something back. This album had good intentions, but absolutely abysmal execution.

If you loved Dedicated to Chaos or Q2k, you'd probably get a kick out of this record. If you liked Geoff's previous solo effort-- or anything else he as ever done-- I'd stand clear of this one.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Guymandude on November 6, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Yeah... this could have been a fairly decent album. Even though the sound quality isn't good, the music itself - the instrumentation, I mean, it's, well, not great, but certainly promising. There's a couple of track in which the intro might actually fool you into believing you will hear some audio gold. BUT.
I think it's rather sad that the main problem with Geoff Tate's solo efforts is Geoff Tate himself. Everyone talks about how that's not the voice that sang Queen of the Reich and other QR classics, but oh boy, lemme tell you. Yes, Geoff is contantly struggling with his own singing, but the thing that really caught my attention was how poor the vocal melodies were. In fact(and I am really really sorry for being so harsh, but the truth hurts sometimes) half of these songs actually sound like Geoff was improvising melodies as he was singing. That's how poor they were.
Look, I don't think that a good singer has to reach insanely high notes to be a good singer- many great singers(IMHO) are actually fairly sober with their voices. See Kevin Moore from OSI for a good example of that. But a good singer ABSOLUTELY need good vocal melodies to get somewhere. ESPECIALLY WHEN THE FOCAL POINT OF THE ALBUM IS SUPPOSED TO BE THE SINGER. They need to connect with the rest of the song. Interact. They need to show that the instrumentation isn't in the background, it's AROUND the singing. Oh, and most of these songs just repeat themselves until the end without any type of dynamic. You heard one minute of a song, you heard it all.
There are few words in the english language appropriate to describe the lyrics of this album accurately. In fact, ''cringe-worty'' is the one I think best summarizes them. Look, I am not a prog-head.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category