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Kino Paperback – April 17, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Atticus Books (April 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0983208077
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983208075
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,380,204 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

''Kino is a fast, complex, exhilarating roadster ride through history and time, a mystery, a documentary, a remarkable remix of reality and imagination. It is the story of a woman who becomes obsessed with her grandfather, a visionary film director in the Germany of the nineteen-twenties through World War II. Tracing the arc of his spectacular decline, she risks a husband and her ordinary life, but uncovers the powerful bindings of family, the sweet, dark loam of loss, and the instant-on high-voltage current of pulp fascism, dirty pictures, propaganda, cultural piracy, art and money.
It's quick but complicated, feverish, trying, speculative, high-minded, and occasionally Goebbels-esque. Everything forced into close and incendiary quarters. Kino is intoxicating Euro-brew, written with enormous skill and dedication.'' -- Frederick Barthelme, author of Elroy Nights

''Jurgen Fauth's deft mashup of genre and historical period is both a full-throttle literary thriller of ideas and a contemplative examination of film and fascism. Kino is a debut of great intellectual force.'' -- Teddy Wayne, author of Kapitoil

''A delirious melange of conspiracy, magic, sex, history, bad behavior, and cinema, Kino is a stellar entertainment, and Jurgen Fauth is a writer of rare, sinister imagination.'' ---- Owen King, author of Reenactment

''A surprising alternative history. Kino brings the golden age of German cinema to light with loving, sometimes gritty, detail and great precision.'' -- Neal Pollack, author of Jewball

''A light-hearted romp that leads straight into darkness and back through the shadows on the wall.'' -- Ben Loory, author of Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day

''This is an elegant book, wrapping the core of a thriller in ideas that play with literary and semiotic conventions...Jurgen Fauth has a confident touch and is worth watching in the future.'' -- David Marshall, Thinking About Books

''Movie nuts, arise! A happy and felicitous debut.'' -- Terese Svoboda, author of Bohemian Girl

''While art may cause mental anguish and distress, ultimately it brings to light the true nature of our existence. That is the brilliance of art, and that is the brilliance of Kino.'' -- Trip Starkey, The Literary Man

''Part historical fiction, part page-turning thriller, Kino is a well-told tale written by someone who exudes confidence on every page. Readers are in good hands with Fauth as he masters his realm, creating a world that is wholly his own yet accurate of a past era. His examination of both art's role in society and the portraits of 1920s Germany is worth the read alone.'' --Patrick Trotti, jmww

About the Author

Jürgen Fauth is a writer, film critic, translator, and co- founder of the literary community Fictionaut. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and received his doctorate from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. He lives with his wife, writer Marcy Dermansky, and their daughter Nina. KINO is his first novel.

More About the Author

Jürgen Fauth is a writer, film critic, translator, and co-founder of the literary community Fictionaut. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and received his doctorate from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. He lives with his wife, writer Marcy Dermansky, and their daughter Nina.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MonicaH on October 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you love film history, you must read this book, the depictions of 1930s Berlin alone are worth buying the book for, but great social commentary on modern state of marriage, film industry, life in general.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sylvia J. Mett on October 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this novel to be filled with interesting facts. This is a very compelling and colorful period in history and the author is very well versed. Meticulously researched. I liked the way he would change from simple narrative to epistolic format for Mina's emails. Character development was quirky and unusual and while there was a dark side to the plot there was plenty of witty repartee. A good read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Horst Woyde on September 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jurgen Fauth came up with a story, which not entirely unexplored, is unique in the authenticity of its setting in between-the-wars Berlin. Being born and living in Germany no doubt worked to Fauth's advantage. Even though the narrative flounders a little at the beginning, the story manages to keep the reader's interest. The characterization of most of the cast is good, with the exception of Mina, the protagonist, who occasionally appears either unfeminine or too "hip" for the time in which the action takes place. The insertion of real political events, other than those taking place in Germany, is handled too casually, as if they weren't really relevant to the story. Also the parts played by the bad guys, the "men in suits," are too reminiscent of those in many other novels. As a bi-national reader myself, I was intrigued by the uncertainty of whether I was reading a German or an American novel. In conclusion, in spite of its few shortcomings, Kino is a wonderful read. I hope Mr. Fauth regales us with another historical thriller.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Johnson on June 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
Kino has a strong and interesting main character--Mina--who drives the story or finds herself driven by a series of somewhat absurd events and circumstances. She's gripped by a mania to discover the mystery behind her famous grandfather, and he's upending her life. It's a interesting story that combines film history with a thriller plot, while also maintaining a realism that's often quite funny.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. GERARD on May 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
I'm not exactly sure where to begin. This book is incredibly fresh and exciting, yet nostalgic and wise. The narrative centers around Mina, a newlywed whose husband is hospitalized during their honeymoon. She mysteriously receives cans of film reels, a lost movie made by her grandfather, a German director. Intrigued, she takes them to Germany to find someone who can run the celluloid, and someone who might know their importance.

Underpinning all of this is the story of her grandfather, Klaus Koblitz. Rather like Germany's Orson Welles Koblitz finds himself touted as a genius of the silent cinema in the heady days of the Weimar Republic. As he recalls in his journal:

"Once upon a time, in another country, I was a young and hopeful cripple. I was a prodigy, the youngest filmmaker in Ufa's history, the toast of Berlin. I still dream of champagne picnics on the Pfaueninsel, the Zoo-Palast filled with an ocean of flowers, just for me. I dream of Studio B and the sets we built for Jagd zu den Steren.
But all of that has been lost, destroyed, buried, bombed, and burnt. I lived my life for light and love, and now the bean counters and brain shrinkers want to break me." ~Pg. 44

As his star rises, so too does the NSDAP and what will soon bring about the Third Reich in Germany. Koblitz (known as Kino) will have to decide whether to stay in Germany with Ufa, or escape to Hollywood after Goebbels is named the Reichspropogandaminister. But unlike so many of his fellow artists, Kino falls for Goebbels' flattery and attempts to flourish under the strict artistic vision for the volk.

As a cinema nerd (well, actually I have a Masters in Cinema Studies -- and I studied German in college), this book is incredibly exciting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PopcornReads on May 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
Kino by Jurgen Fauth is an interesting genre mix. It combines a contemporary thriller with historical fiction about the golden age of German filmmaking and, as odd as that may sound, it works.

Jurgen Fauth took on a very complex project with this debut novel and it works amazingly well. Parts of it have the feel of a documentary, so much so that I did some research to find out if Kino actually existed. This novel brings up a lot of issues including those around choices made and the consequences thereof, family myths, the artist's role in society, forgiveness and redemption. If you like historical fiction, thrillers, or film, then I strongly suspect you will enjoy Kino. For my complete review of this novel, go to [...]
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