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Kino Paperback – April 17, 2012


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Editorial Reviews

Review

''Kino is a fast, complex, exhilarating roadster ride through history and time, a mystery, a documentary, a remarkable remix of reality and imagination. It is the story of a woman who becomes obsessed with her grandfather, a visionary film director in the Germany of the nineteen-twenties through World War II. Tracing the arc of his spectacular decline, she risks a husband and her ordinary life, but uncovers the powerful bindings of family, the sweet, dark loam of loss, and the instant-on high-voltage current of pulp fascism, dirty pictures, propaganda, cultural piracy, art and money.
It's quick but complicated, feverish, trying, speculative, high-minded, and occasionally Goebbels-esque. Everything forced into close and incendiary quarters. Kino is intoxicating Euro-brew, written with enormous skill and dedication.'' -- Frederick Barthelme, author of Elroy Nights

''Jurgen Fauth's deft mashup of genre and historical period is both a full-throttle literary thriller of ideas and a contemplative examination of film and fascism. Kino is a debut of great intellectual force.'' -- Teddy Wayne, author of Kapitoil

''A delirious melange of conspiracy, magic, sex, history, bad behavior, and cinema, Kino is a stellar entertainment, and Jurgen Fauth is a writer of rare, sinister imagination.'' ---- Owen King, author of Reenactment

''A surprising alternative history. Kino brings the golden age of German cinema to light with loving, sometimes gritty, detail and great precision.'' -- Neal Pollack, author of Jewball

''A light-hearted romp that leads straight into darkness and back through the shadows on the wall.'' -- Ben Loory, author of Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day

''This is an elegant book, wrapping the core of a thriller in ideas that play with literary and semiotic conventions...Jurgen Fauth has a confident touch and is worth watching in the future.'' -- David Marshall, Thinking About Books

''Movie nuts, arise! A happy and felicitous debut.'' -- Terese Svoboda, author of Bohemian Girl

''While art may cause mental anguish and distress, ultimately it brings to light the true nature of our existence. That is the brilliance of art, and that is the brilliance of Kino.'' -- Trip Starkey, The Literary Man

''Part historical fiction, part page-turning thriller, Kino is a well-told tale written by someone who exudes confidence on every page. Readers are in good hands with Fauth as he masters his realm, creating a world that is wholly his own yet accurate of a past era. His examination of both art's role in society and the portraits of 1920s Germany is worth the read alone.'' --Patrick Trotti, jmww

About the Author

Jürgen Fauth is a writer, film critic, translator, and co- founder of the literary community Fictionaut. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and received his doctorate from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. He lives with his wife, writer Marcy Dermansky, and their daughter Nina. KINO is his first novel.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Atticus Books (April 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0983208077
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983208075
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,185,923 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jürgen Fauth is a writer, film critic, translator, and co-founder of the literary community Fictionaut. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and received his doctorate from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. He lives with his wife, writer Marcy Dermansky, and their daughter Nina.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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55%
4 star
36%
3 star
9%
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See all 11 customer reviews
Real life personalities like Fritz Lang, Billy Wilder, GW Pabst and Peter Lorre appear.
M. GERARD
Kino has a strong and interesting main character--Mina--who drives the story or finds herself driven by a series of somewhat absurd events and circumstances.
M. Johnson
Liked the pace, the intrigue, mixed well heroic sentiment and anti-heroic behavior, the mystical and hard boiled realism.
MountainDog

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brooks Williams on April 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
I like my movies a little bit strange. My favorites are Jeunet & Caro's The City of Lost Children (La cité des enfants perdus) and Wes Anderson's The Royal Tennenbaums. In the case of both films, I walked out of the theater unsure of what I'd just seen, but I knew that my mind had been thoroughly blown. I imagine that the German audiences of the 1920's and 30's that watched the films directed by Klaus Koblitz (aka "Kino") felt the same way. That's why they were so valuable. That's one of the reasons that the Nazi's burned them.

Jürgen Fauth's debut novel focuses on Mina "Wilhemina" Koblitz, the young granddaughter of the famed German filmmaker and the adventure that ensues when a mysterious set of film canisters appear on her doorstep. The film turns out to be Tulpendiebe (The Tulip Thief), Kino's first and most famous film. Knowing that her grandfather's films were thought to be lost, Mina knows that she's got something very valuable in her hands and she immediately travels to Germany to watch the film. Once in Germany the film is stolen, Mina is chased by two men in suits, and a mysterious stranger in a red jacket gives Mina her grandfather's journal.

The journal was my favorite part of Kino. Written while locked up in a insane asylum in the 1960's, Klaus Koblitz tells the story of how he he made himself into the famous Kino. Fauth slips in a lot of German film history without being annoying about it. I certainly didn't know much about Weimer-era Germany, much less about Fritz Lang, Leni Riefenstahl and others German film luminaries. It all comes alive in Kino's journal and I found myself wanting to see the films and learn more about the strange time between wars.
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Format: Paperback
INTRODUCTION: With the blurb below and coming from Atticus Books of which I saw and heard quite a lot of good things, I was very interested in Kino and read it pretty much on obtaining an e-arc a few months ago, while the book is scheduled to be published April 17, though Amazon has it already shipping. While mostly a cross between historical fiction and standard contemporary thriller, Kino has a sfnal aspect too, but more about this below.

Here is a quote from Kino's diary:

''I came from nothing, I scaled the Olymp, and I can do it again. Even when the Nazis burned my movies, I clung to hope. You have marked me crazy and yet you ask me to explain myself. Art will prevail! I'll make another movie yet. Cinema cannot be detained! Nothing can stop me, for I am Kino.''

Here is the actual blurb:

"When the long lost, first-ever silent film from visionary director Kino arrives mysteriously on his granddaughter Mina's doorstep, the mission to discover the man she barely knew begins. As Kino's journals plunge the reader into the depraved glamour and infectious panic of 1920s and '30s Germany, Mina turns her life upside down to redeem her grandfather's legend.

With a cast of characters that includes Joseph Goebbels, Fritz Lang and Leni Riefenstahl, Fauth concocts a genre-busting blend of German history, film, and art into a fast, sinister tale of redemption. The tightly woven narrative is filled with thuggish darkness and back alley shadows running neck-and-neck with cinematic light and intrigue.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By literalab on May 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
When Wilhemina Koblitz, called Mina, comes home after visiting her new husband in a New York hospital, the decadence of Weimar Berlin and the magical possibilities of cinema are likely distant from her preoccupations. The delivery of a pair of metal film canisters changes all that though, to the point that she plunges into a search in space and time for the truth about her long-dead film director grandfather, Klaus "Kino" Koblitz, a pursuit that ends up turning her life upside down.

The search portrayed in Jürgen Fauth's debut novel Kino is actually a high-octane chase that extends from the streets of Berlin all the way to a derelict house in the Hollywood Hills and a nearby film studio. Yet the real target lies in the distant past, and Mina has to navigate the varied and conflicting versions of her grandfather's life and death as best she can in order to find the answers she is looking for.

Considering the darkness of much of the subject matter - Nazis, suicide, drug addiction and divorce - the novel is filled with humor, though of the black variety, as when the one-legged Kino writes in his diary: "I wasn't always a pathetic old doped-up cripple. Once upon a time, in another country, I was a young and hopeful cripple."

Fauth effectively brings forth a variety of worlds in the novel without slackening the pace of the frantic chase that summons them in the first place. He also deftly weaves the fictional world of Kino with the real-life world of Fritz Lang, producer Erich Pommer and Joseph Goebbels among many others, grounding the often unreal events of the novel in the similarly unreal events of what took place in the Germany and Hollywood of that time.
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