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on May 3, 2014
I have long been a fan of Kirby. Kirby's Dream Land 2 was one of the first video games I ever played as a child. The first two Kirby's Dream Land games (alongside TLoZ: Link's Awakening and Pokemon Blue) were my go-to games on road trips and for cool-down/relaxation after long days of swimming/hiking/adventuring in the hot summers where I grew up. I'd even play them for hours into the night when I was supposed to be sleeping, huddled under my bedroom lamp with my Game Boy Pocket and later my GBC and GBA. Needless to say, I have always loved Kirby, whether it is traditional Kirby or experimental Kirby, so OF COURSE I was going to get Kirby Triple Deluxe immediately as soon as my local *cough cough* opened on release day. After all, a traditional Kirby game like this in the handheld format where he started simply must be played if you're a fan of Nintendo's famous puffball. Let me tell you, I have loved every single second of my time with Triple Deluxe (henceforth called KTD in this review). It's a great new addition to the Kirby mythos.

The story in KTD is rather strange and novel. You see, King Dedede has been kidnapped by some nefarious spider-like being named Taranza, who arrived in a giant "dreamstalk" that has left Pop Star quite disheveled. Kirby has taken it upon himself to rescue his sometimes-foe/friend-forever and it goes from there. Stories in Kirby games have always been simplistic affairs, designed to introduce the awesome gameplay and presentation and then take a step back to let that shine, and it does that here very well. I DO like that you're rescuing Dedede though. That's a really neat new idea. The story develops nicely too, introducing some twists and turns that are pretty decent toward the end. I liked it.

The core of the gameplay feels like an improvement on Kirby's last outing, Kirby's Return to Dream Land (which, as you can tell by my review on there, I also loved immensely). In fact, KTD kind of feels like a spiritual sequel to that fantastic Wii game. As you'd expect from a traditional Kirby game, you'll be inhaling enemies, coping their abilities by viciously digesting them OR star-shooting them back out, slide kicking, floating, etc. You know the drill. There's something very cathartic and viscerally satisfying about this formula, and the way KTD not only refines it but also builds upon it is genuinely thrilling. The controls here are smooth as silk. The game is just so delightfully FUN to play! Boss fights are tense and feel like fights between titanic rivals. I really love the deceptive simplicity of old-school Kirby gameplay. Each of the roughly 25 copy-abilities (that's a lot!) has a startling number of moves depending on the control-context you use them in, so there's plenty of fun to be had with this game. There are several new copy-abilities that have been added in this outing. The bow-and-arrow, complete with a dashing Robin Hood-esque feathered cap, is my personal favorite. There are also some new abilities you can use such as "hypernova" mode which amplifies Kirby's inhalation exponentially, causing him to suck in trees, huge projectiles to fire back, and otherwise unmovable objects. It's pretty fun.

The biggest addition to the gameplay in this one is the emphasis on 2.5-D platforming. Utilizing the 3-D in the 3DS to great effect, you'll be jumping between the foreground and background frequently in the levels as you play. I love 2.5-D elements in platformers, and its inclusion here adds a nice sense of freshness to the traditional Kirby experience. As a bonus, it makes the 3-D effect look even more stunning and memorable. I really enjoyed this. As was the case with the aforementioned Return to Dreamland, KTD has tons of collectibles and special items that definitely fleshes the game out for those who like to hunt for such things and be completionists. I fall into that category, so I have really enjoyed that aspect. It's also worth mentioning that, once you beat the game, you can play through it as King Dedede if you so desire, in a mode called "Dedede Tour." He plays very similarly to the way he did in Kirby's Return to Dreamland with his hammer, and the difficulty seems to be amped up by quite a bit too. I really enjoyed this inclusion, as King Dedede is a character I've always had affection for. There are a couple other modes included as well. One is a platforming/rhythm hybrid and the other is basically Kirby Smash Bros. These are really fun, but they're admittedly nonessential to the overall enjoyment of the game. Think of them as bonuses.

The presentation in this game is wonderful. It utilizes the same kind of graphics that KRTD had to stunning effect on the 3DS screen (it may even be the same engine, which is even more impressive on a handheld). This game is gorgeously colorful and is full of the kind of childlike whimsy we all love (WITHOUT SHAME) Kirby for. I love the beautiful pastel colors that are so abundant in this game. So many of the environments in this game made me smile. Really, almost everything in the game's presentation made me smile. The characters and their animations are all so delightfully endearing. I love the many different forms Kirby takes on with each ability he copies. It's games like this that reinforce my belief that emphasis on timeless, vibrant art design is better for a game's look than trying to be hyper-realistic (those games always age poorly and quickly). This game is simply a delight visually. As I said earlier, the 3-D effect is really neat looking in this game. The sound design is also well done. This may be my favorite soundtrack in a Kirby game since Kirby Super Star Ultra. It's undeniably catchy and in that old-school Kirby style that is quick and pumps you up for pink puffball action! The stuff that isn't fast-paced is downright moody, atmospheric, even haunting at times (that final boss theme... wow). I love it all. The presentation in this game is awesome. Bravo to the developers for their great work here!

All-in-all, I think we have a winner with Kirby Triple Deluxe. It's a fun, frantic journey to Pop Star that delivers everything you could want and hope for from a Kirby game. I also really enjoyed all the new gameplay elements, both minor and fairly major, that this game adds to the Kirby pathos. If you're like me and you grew up playing and loving the Kirby series, from his humble roots to his most recent adventures, then I guarantee you'll love Kirby Triple Deluxe. My recommendation? Buy it, devour this incredibly fun game, and enjoy every juicy pink second of Kirby's newest adventure.
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on May 4, 2014
Certain critics have attacked the Kirby franchise before for not being challenging enough, or not offering enough precise platforming, or this, or that. Those critics will go unnamed, although they totally know who they are, and you probably do too. My response has always been that HAL's venerable franchise was never, has never and will never be about intense difficulty, and instead, has a square focus on pure, simple fun. Entry after entry, whether they focus on old-school platforming or a neat little gimmick (Tilt N' Tumble and Mass Attack come to mind,) these games have historically been a delight, through and through. While there is significant challenge present in bonus stages and item hunting, the biggest emphasis is on just having a grand old time.

That's why "Kirby Triple Deluxe" is such a joy, I think. Returning to the franchise's roots as a vibrant platformer on a handheld, this newest offering takes everything that was so great about "Return to Dreamland," then builds upon it with a plethora of ideas both old and new. Of course, we see Kirby's classic suction ability return, and along with it, a "greatest hits" of sorts of power-ups, along with some neat new tricks.The Bell power lets the pink puffball whallop foes with two chiming bells, and the Beetle power sees him take on the form of a rhinoceros beetle, complete with a horn to impale with and wings to fly around with. My personal favorite new addition would have to be the Archer ability, which gives Kirby a fedora (m'lady) and a bow, allowing him to either accurately pierce enemies with shots, or fire a barrage in mid-air. It comes in handy quite often. The much-hyped Hypernova ability is also fun, allowing Kirby to gobble up everything on screen, including things that are much, much larger than him, such as huge trees and entire trains. Also nice are some returning abilities that were omitted from "Return," such as the excellent Wheel ability. All-in-all, the variety of power-ups here, at around 25 or so unique abilities, is great, and despite one or two duds (like the perfunctory Circus,) they're mostly a joy to toy around with.

As for the brunt of the gameplay itself, you'll find that this is the arguably the most polished entry since "Crystal Shards," with platforming that can either be done with the D-Pad or Circle Pad. Controlling Kirby feels nice, as he has a nice amount of heft to him, yet at the same time feels light and puffy when he's floating through the air, as one would expect. Furthermore, this game continues the trend of recent entries of allowing the little guy to float simply by holding the jump button, and also letting him float for a seemingly indefinite amount of time. And while this may seem like a very odd thing to commend, I can't help but give serious props to the swimming controls, which are typically the bane of any good platformer. Players will feel entirely in control of Kirby as he swims around underwater, avoiding obstacles and hitting enemies with little bubble jets. Too many games get underwater mechanics wrong, by either making the character move too sluggishly or too erratically, and this is one of the only ones in recent memory that I can remember getting it so, so right.

Despite being a classic Kirby platformer, there is a bit of gimmickry here that takes advantage of the 3DS' abilities. The most noticeable of these is the fact that almost every level has a foreground and background that Kirby can switch between. That means that not only can enemies or obstacles smack you from the left or right, but also from the front or back. While it is definitely true that this is a cool concept without the 3D slider dialed up, having that feature enabled really brings a lot to the table. It feels like the whole world is really popping out at you, and possesses a great deal of depth. Having the 3D enabled also allows you to see collectibles and distinguish when an enemy is in front of you or to the side of you more easily, which makes it one of the only 3DS games in which I feel the effect actually adds to the experience. Also taken advantage of here are gyroscope capabilities, and while they usually annoy me in other games, I find that they work like a charm here. They're non-obtrusive and utilized in fun, creative ways. Bonus points for there being an ever-present re-calibration option on the bottom screen!

The gameplay of "Triple Deluxe" is not only fun, but incredibly functional. Everything here works just like it ought to, and the gimmicks are limited but used right. It plays like a dream for those looking for a casual romp through colorful levels, and for those who want to challenge themselves by getting the collectible knick-knacks, which actually becomes surprisingly difficult in some levels. There are Sun Stones that unlock bonus levels, and "Keychains" from most of the Kirby titles, which are collectibles in the vein of the "Super Smash Brothers" trophies. Speaking of which, the two other games here are pretty nifty. One of them is a "Smash Bros" clone with a surprising amount of variety, which will probably tide you over until the real thing hits this summer, and another is a challenging rhythm/platformer hybrid in which you play as DeDeDe. You're getting a pretty great value for 30-40 bucks, and whether you're an adult hoping to get bang for your buck, or a parent looking for satiate their kid with a game that will last a while, this fits the bill.

"Triple Deluxe" is not only fun to play, but it's also a delight to see and hear. This might actually be the best Kirby yet in terms of A/V prowess. The levels are all incredibly varied, even within themed worlds, and the vibrant nature of the visuals helps players to relax and simply enjoy their time bouncing around the world. Kirby's character model is expressive and downright charming, and each time he does something new, you can't help but to let out a tiny "aww." All of the other models are nice, too, though, with every enemy having a nice variety of movements and expressions, and most of the boss battles being fairly creative. It's all held together by a charming soundtrack with only one track that I personally didn't care for, and the rest possessing more musical variety than one would expect from the series. Good stuff, for sure, and some of the best visual aesthetics and audio in a 3DS title to date.

Personally, I feel that those who would give this a game a bad review on account of it being "too easy" simply don't get it. Because, frankly, that's not a real critique. If you took one look at a Kirby game, you'd know what you were getting into. This is a game whose core demographic consists of children and those looking to have a relaxing time with a fun, breezy game. And by those standards, "Triple Deluxe" delivers in spades. It can be enjoyed as a fun, simple platformer, and it can also be broken apart as a nice challenge if one undergoes the task of unlocking every bonus level and collecting every trinket, not to mention playing the other modes to completion. Everything here is a fantastic value, and an overall great time.

"Kirby Triple Deluxe" is one of those titles that I would argue is essential to anybody purchasing the console it belongs to. This is definitely one of the best 3DS games available, and if you know what you're getting into, then you can expect to spend a good amount of time with, and you should certainly buy it. Not only that, but you can also expect to have a smile on your face for most of that time, which is pretty high praise for any game. Yes, the story is a bit non-existent, and yes, you can breeze through the main campaign it if you so choose, but if you're having fun the entire time, I'd contend that it doesn't really matter. There's a lot to do here, and all of it is fun.

Plus, come on, how bad can a game be if you can suck an entire train off of its rails? Not bad at all, I'd say. Not bad at all.

Score: 9.0
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on May 2, 2014
I've been a fan of the Kirby series for a long time now and was super excited to see another handheld entry in the franchise! If you've played the game before, the basic premise remains unchanged. It's not the most difficult or complex game ever, but it builds upon a solid foundation and makes it even better! The graphics are bright and whimsical and the gameplay is very smooth. My only gripe is that I wish we could swap the controls but that's a pretty minor one. I highly recommend this game and hope that there will be more 3DS Kirby games in the future!
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on August 29, 2015
Certain critics have attacked the Kirby franchise before for not being challenging enough, or not offering enough precise platforming, or this, or that. Those critics will go unnamed, although they totally know who they are, and you probably do too. My response has always been that HAL's venerable franchise was never, has never and will never be about intense difficulty, and instead, has a square focus on pure, simple fun. Entry after entry, whether they focus on old-school platforming or a neat little gimmick (Tilt N' Tumble and Mass Attack come to mind,) these games have historically been a delight, through and through. While there is significant challenge present in bonus stages and item hunting, the biggest emphasis is on just having a grand old time.

That's why "Kirby Triple Deluxe" is such a joy, I think. Returning to the franchise's roots as a vibrant platformer on a handheld, this newest offering takes everything that was so great about "Return to Dreamland," then builds upon it with a plethora of ideas both old and new. Of course, we see Kirby's classic suction ability return, and along with it, a "greatest hits" of sorts of power-ups, along with some neat new tricks.The Bell power lets the pink puffball whallop foes with two chiming bells, and the Beetle power sees him take on the form of a rhinoceros beetle, complete with a horn to impale with and wings to fly around with. My personal favorite new addition would have to be the Archer ability, which gives Kirby a fedora (m'lady) and a bow, allowing him to either accurately pierce enemies with shots, or fire a barrage in mid-air. It comes in handy quite often. The much-hyped Hypernova ability is also fun, allowing Kirby to gobble up everything on screen, including things that are much, much larger than him, such as huge trees and entire trains. Also nice are some returning abilities that were omitted from "Return," such as the excellent Wheel ability. All-in-all, the variety of power-ups here, at around 25 or so unique abilities, is great, and despite one or two duds (like the perfunctory Circus,) they're mostly a joy to toy around with.

As for the brunt of the gameplay itself, you'll find that this is the arguably the most polished entry since "Crystal Shards," with platforming that can either be done with the D-Pad or Circle Pad. Controlling Kirby feels nice, as he has a nice amount of heft to him, yet at the same time feels light and puffy when he's floating through the air, as one would expect. Furthermore, this game continues the trend of recent entries of allowing the little guy to float simply by holding the jump button, and also letting him float for a seemingly indefinite amount of time. And while this may seem like a very odd thing to commend, I can't help but give serious props to the swimming controls, which are typically the bane of any good platformer. Players will feel entirely in control of Kirby as he swims around underwater, avoiding obstacles and hitting enemies with little bubble jets. Too many games get underwater mechanics wrong, by either making the character move too sluggishly or too erratically, and this is one of the only ones in recent memory that I can remember getting it so, so right.

Despite being a classic Kirby platformer, there is a bit of gimmickry here that takes advantage of the 3DS' abilities. The most noticeable of these is the fact that almost every level has a foreground and background that Kirby can switch between. That means that not only can enemies or obstacles smack you from the left or right, but also from the front or back. While it is definitely true that this is a cool concept without the 3D slider dialed up, having that feature enabled really brings a lot to the table. It feels like the whole world is really popping out at you, and possesses a great deal of depth. Having the 3D enabled also allows you to see collectibles and distinguish when an enemy is in front of you or to the side of you more easily, which makes it one of the only 3DS games in which I feel the effect actually adds to the experience. Also taken advantage of here are gyroscope capabilities, and while they usually annoy me in other games, I find that they work like a charm here. They're non-obtrusive and utilized in fun, creative ways. Bonus points for there being an ever-present re-calibration option on the bottom screen!

The gameplay of "Triple Deluxe" is not only fun, but incredibly functional. Everything here works just like it ought to, and the gimmicks are limited but used right. It plays like a dream for those looking for a casual romp through colorful levels, and for those who want to challenge themselves by getting the collectible knick-knacks, which actually becomes surprisingly difficult in some levels. There are Sun Stones that unlock bonus levels, and "Keychains" from most of the Kirby titles, which are collectibles in the vein of the "Super Smash Brothers" trophies. Speaking of which, the two other games here are pretty nifty. One of them is a "Smash Bros" clone with a surprising amount of variety, which will probably tide you over until the real thing hits this summer, and another is a challenging rhythm/platformer hybrid in which you play as DeDeDe. You're getting a pretty great value for 30-40 bucks, and whether you're an adult hoping to get bang for your buck, or a parent looking for satiate their kid with a game that will last a while, this fits the bill.

"Triple Deluxe" is not only fun to play, but it's also a delight to see and hear. This might actually be the best Kirby yet in terms of A/V prowess. The levels are all incredibly varied, even within themed worlds, and the vibrant nature of the visuals helps players to relax and simply enjoy their time bouncing around the world. Kirby's character model is expressive and downright charming, and each time he does something new, you can't help but to let out a tiny "aww." All of the other models are nice, too, though, with every enemy having a nice variety of movements and expressions, and most of the boss battles being fairly creative. It's all held together by a charming soundtrack with only one track that I personally didn't care for, and the rest possessing more musical variety than one would expect from the series. Good stuff, for sure, and some of the best visual aesthetics and audio in a 3DS title to date.

Personally, I feel that those who would give this a game a bad review on account of it being "too easy" simply don't get it. Because, frankly, that's not a real critique. If you took one look at a Kirby game, you'd know what you were getting into. This is a game whose core demographic consists of children and those looking to have a relaxing time with a fun, breezy game. And by those standards, "Triple Deluxe" delivers in spades. It can be enjoyed as a fun, simple platformer, and it can also be broken apart as a nice challenge if one undergoes the task of unlocking every bonus level and collecting every trinket, not to mention playing the other modes to completion. Everything here is a fantastic value, and an overall great time.

"Kirby Triple Deluxe" is one of those titles that I would argue is essential to anybody purchasing the console it belongs to. This is definitely one of the best 3DS games available, and if you know what you're getting into, then you can expect to spend a good amount of time with, and you should certainly buy it. Not only that, but you can also expect to have a smile on your face for most of that time, which is pretty high praise for any game. Yes, the story is a bit non-existent, and yes, you can breeze through the main campaign it if you so choose, but if you're having fun the entire time, I'd contend that it doesn't really matter. There's a lot to do here, and all of it is fun.

Plus, come on, how bad can a game be if you can suck an entire train off of its rails? Not bad at all, I'd say. Not bad at all.
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on May 15, 2014
This is my first Kirby game, as I was waiting for one to come out on the 3ds. The only part that I knew at all was that Kirby was in it. It allowed me to catch up on the past though, with keychains of characters and other things of the past and present (one you get all 100 of the Sun Stones throughout the levels you unlock the Queen Sectonia keychain) along with moments later in the story mode game, with the generations of Kirby and the first Kirby fighting the first King Dedede? I don't even know who he is, but in this game he is mistaken for Kirby by Tarazana (don't know who or what he is either). The Kawaii and 3D of this game (I never use my 3D BTW) is too awesome and I highly recommend using the 3D to make it easier and more fun.

The story mode of this game is super easy and simple to me, and I think I only died once. I found all 100 of the Sun Stones, which are not difficult to achieve. Except for the fact you only walk strait, this is similar to Super Mario 3D Land, especially since after you complete the main it gives you the ability (not in story mode though) to do a fun time trial through a speedier version as you play as King Dedede where the only special thing you unlock is keychains and time trials to race with your friends with Streetpass. Streetpass has multiple uses with this cartridge, but like Super Mario 3D Land, you can get "power ups" from people on Streetpass. Another Pro, YOU DO NOT NEED MULTIPLE CARTRIDGES TO DOWNLOAD. Like Mario Kart 7, there are 4 rooms you can download to to play another persons game if you have the same, OR you can download with more limited options from download play. The download for this is Kirby Fighters, which my helpful advice is press B to win, I don't do this but I know it works well.

Dedede's Drum Dash is another option to play, which I have achieved all 4 gold medals on. It is NOT hard, a very entertaining not-maddening game. Played it forever for fun!

There is also another game you unlock when you complete story mode where you defeat 10 bosses in a time trial that also uses Streetpass. Some bosses have been upgraded in color, they are still the same level of difficulty.

I am 12 years old, beat this in 6.5 hours, and would recommend to anyone who wants to have fun. Love this game and will purchase in future other Kirby games in future.😊
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on November 14, 2014
Before I start this review I just want to say, this isn't a BAD game.

I bought this game feeling quite nostalgic of the classic Kirby 64. I thought it would bring back that same fantastic gameplay with many improvements, but in all honesty, it actually felt quite the opposite. First off, Kirby feels really slow...Even when you're dashing. He doesn't have that satisfying dash when you slam the joystick to the left or right. So right off the bat you'll notice the change of pace and trust me, you won't get used to it. You'll constantly feel like you can run faster, but you can't.

Second, the levels. The art and colors look great, but after the first few levels you'll feel like you're playing the same level again and again. They showcased the warpstar (which allows you to travel into the background of the level) right away, which, don't get me wrong, is a very cool gimmick, but It just felt they just used it in spots that didn't need it. It felt like they thought that it would spice up the level, but it didn't it felt overused in some levels and it got really boring, REALLY fast.

3rd, this game has a lot of mario elements. Ex. The sun stones (marios star coins), the boo looking creature that doesn't move when you look at them, but when you turn away he comes after you.

The enemies are too weak, the puzzles aren't even really puzzles.

Overall, it's not a bad game, but it's not amazing in anyway. The graphics are nice, the power ups are all right. I would;t recommend it to anyone though.
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on July 2, 2014
I haven't played many Kirby games in my day, but as far as platformers go, it feels a bit slow - which is all well and good, but not for the tastes of folks who love the versatility and speed of a Mario game, or Rayman, or Super Meat Boy, etc.

It is fun for a while, and the different abilities you can get from enemies creates a great way to discover new and fun ways to beat down your foes. I played it on the 3ds XL, and, while the colors and visuals are appealing, the graphics seem... fuzzy. I know that sounds weird, but it threw me off. Graphics do not make a game, so take that with a grain of salt.

If you are in need of something new to play, its a good buy. But don't rush to add it to your collection if you already have a backlog of games to get through.
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on May 2, 2014
By now we all know the kirby game play. Yes is easy. It always has been. That's not the point. It's still extremely fun with good abilities and nice graphics. A fun stress free game. Highly recommended to kirby fans.
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VINE VOICEon May 24, 2014
The Good:

+Great graphics, art design and delightful animations
+Some really creative levels
+A lot of variety in powers
+A lot of content, including two mini-games at the start and a lengthy campaign
+Good use of the 3DS technology without making it all feel tacked on

The Bad:

-It's incredibly easy
-You're not likely to spend a lot of time with the mini-games

---

Kirby has always been one of Nintendo's more popular characters. He's never grown to the popularity of Mario or Zelda, but he has always had a few delightful adventures. It feels like a long time since we last got a really good handheld Kirby Adventure. And Triple Deluxe may, in fact, be among the best the series has ever seen. Each level is creative, artistic and fun. There is plenty to do and a lot to explore in what may be one of Kirby's finest handheld adventures.

Triple Deluxe focuses on a beanstalk (referred to as a Dreamstalk) that grows and carries Kirby's house high off the ground. It also carries other parts of Dreamworld, including King Dedede's castle. A mysterious menace known as Taranza comes into the frey and easily dispatches Dedede's henchmen before kidnapping Dedede himself. It's up to Kirby to save Dedede and stop Taranza. As with Mario, Kirby hasn't exactly been about story. It's often been about the gameplay, level design and exploration. Kirby Triple Deluxe does that well. It's a pretty simple game in its own right but it's how so much of it blends together rather well that makes everything about it really stick out. There are various floating islands to go to. You'll start in world 1-1 which is more or less just a basic level. Unlike a lot of games (even side scrollers) Kirby doesn't waste a lot of time with a tutorial. You'll see signs that show you the basic controls, but they don't interrupt the flow of the game through the level.

Everything in Kirby is going to feel familiar to anyone who has played some of his previous outings. Kirby has the ability to suck in air and spit it out, as well as hover over his enemies. As before, Kirby can also suck up certain enemies and utilize their powers. There are tons of different enemies in the game, which make for a lot of different powers for Kirby to use. It's fun to mix and match and experiment. The game never abandons you, however. Always making sure the right enemy with the right power is close by for an upcoming mini-boss or for a difficult task at hand. Likewise, quite a few of your enemies respawn quickly should you lose your power up or lose a life. There are tons of abilities to copy throughout your adventure. Some of the best, however, come when you take in the mini-bosses. You'll be able to use whips, shoot arrows or slash with a sword in no time.

The best new addition to Triple Deluxe, however, is the Hypernova. Sometimes you'll find a special berry that lets Kirby use this fantastic technique. Utilizing it, you'll be able to suck up just about anything in your path from a long distance. The detail is fun to see, as well. Using the hypernova you might see Kirby uproot trees, suck in larger enemies he normally wouldn't be able to or even send enormous objects hurling back at enemies. There are also times when it's used to solve quick puzzles. Enormous blocks can be dragged to create paths. You'll also use this ability to defeat mini-bosses along the way.

It's the level designs in Kirby that'll delight more than anything. A lot of the levels are quite creative. And, at least for the first leg or so of your journey, every level introduces something new. But more than that, no level feels like any other level. As each one introduces something else, they also make sure to keep the utilization of those things coming in other ways. You might see a platform hanging from a rope that needs to be shot one moment with a simple arrow. The next, it's underwater and you have to find another means to cut the rope.

That's not all, there are few games that make quite as good use of the actual hardware as Kirby Triple Deluxe. The gyro controls even have some use without necessarily being annoying or feeling too tacked on. You might jump into a bowl of water and have to tilt the 3DS one way or the other to water plants or put out a fire. Even the 3D itself isn't actually bad. In many levels there are enemies in the foreground and the background. It's interesting to see enemies directly in your path trying to pummel you with attacks, but you also come across plenty in the background, throwing bombs into the foregrounds. Or even threats. In one level there's a cannon firing at you from the background. In other levels you'll see boulders rolling from the background into the foreground. This is all pretty cool stuff. And every now and then you'll find a star that allows you to go into the background and take out the enemies there. Putting on the 3D certainly helps to make some of these moments much easier to get through. Particularly in some of the games boss battles where the baddies jump to and from the background and foreground. In fact, the boss fights are some of the best things you'll see in Kirby Triple Deluxe. They are often unique battles. It might take a moment to recognize an area boss's pattern or to really gauge their attacks, but they'll certainly keep you on your toes. Some of the most exciting moments in Kirby Triple Deluxe come from the uniqueness of the boss fights. There simply aren't many moments like it on the 3DS.

The levels in Kriby Triple Deluxe are not short, either. They're actually quite lengthy, often ending with a mini-boss of some sort. But you'll want to go back into each level just the same an explore a little more. Every level has several keychains for you to find. Rare ones and common ones alike. But the real deal about each level is collecting the various sunstones. The boss of each area can't be accessed without the right amount of sunstones in your possession. If you find every sunstone in an area you'll be able to access an extra level as well. Kirby Triple Deluxe is a surprisingly lengthy game as a result if you decide you need to find everything there is to uncover.

If there was any complaints about Kirby Triple Deluxe it would be that the game itself is far too easy and simple. The game is no challenge whatsoever. Many enemies are easily dispatched and there are plenty of health restoring items everywhere. There are even some of King Dedede's minions that'll give you some food to put in your reserves so that you can restore your health at the press of a button or the tap of your bottom screen. This along makes even some of the more challenging boss fights a cakewalk. The game gets a little difficult going into the home stretch, but it's not difficult enough to be a problem. At the very least there's no Super Guide if you do happen to die too much, and Nintendo isn't throwing extra lives at you at every turn. Kirby Triple Deluxe is a really easy game, but at least Nintendo didn't opt to hold your hand with this one.

There are other things to Kirby as well. There's more than just the main campaign. There is also Kirby Fighters where many different Copy Ability Kirby's can battle. It's quite similar to Super Smash Brothers in this regard. There are even items and environmental hazards to beware. It's not quite as robust as Super Smash Brothers, however. There are only ten copy abilities to choose from and in Single Player it isn't really anything special. In multiplayer, however, it is surprisingly fun. There's also Dedede's Drum Dash. Which is like a rhythm game. You'll bounce on drums, collecting coins to get to the end of a level. It's timed and you get rewarded for finishing quickly, collecting all the coins and taking no damage. It's a surprisingly difficult game mini-game to get the hang of at first. Even though you're just bouncing from one drum to another. You'll have moments where you need to press the A button at the right time to bounce higher. The timing is a little hard to get, but once you do get it down it's a surprisingly fun little mini-game. It's short lived, however.

Graphically, Kirby has hardly looked this good on a handheld. The levels themselves (presented in 2.5D) are colorful and detailed. It's got a nice look and feel to it. The music is also just as playful sounding and fun. All told, artistically, Kirby is a great looking game. Everything also happens to animate really well. As mentioned earlier, the 3D is also quite good. It's a graphically good looking game with a great art design to accompany it. It's colorful and vibrant, easily making for one of the best looking side scrollers on the 3DS to date.

Kirby Triple Deluxe is a great game. It mashes its elements together really well and creates a nice meaty package for those interested. You probably won't spend as many time on the mini-games as you will the main campaign, but the fact that there is so much content included here makes the game worth the purchase for any Kirby fan. It may not be a difficult game, by any means, but clever and creative level design as well as lots of collecting to do is enough to keep the fun going for a long while. If you've enjoyed Kirby's previous outings then you ought to try Triple Deluxe because it's without a doubt one of his best.
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on May 4, 2014
Kirby: Triple Deluxe is the latest game in the Kirby series, and the first original Kirby title for Nintendo 3DS. This game presents an excellent platforming experience with content suitable for both casual and intense players. Let's look at the game in detail.

Kirby: Triple Deluxe plays very similarly to most other games in the series. Kirby, the titular pink puffball, proceeds along a 2.5D environment filled with collectibles, sucking up enemies to copy their powers. These include four new copy-abilities: Bell, Archer, Beetle, and Circus, all of which I had a lot of fun using, though I think Archer was my favorite. But with these similarities, don't think this is a mere rehash; you'll notice early on that it's not. The most obvious change is the environments. In the background and foreground, enemies, items, environmental hazards, etc. are found, and often have their attacks shift into Kirby's path. Through the use of 3D Warp Stars, Kirby can shift between the background and foreground to get items, affect the environment, defeat enemies, and solve puzzles. Kirby can even use some items in one part of the level to affect the other part, such as a long pole and a cannon. While not particularly hard like most Kirby games, this concept very fun, well-implemented, and on the perfect hardware. I played this game with the 3D on full blast the whole time, as it just makes the 2.5D environments all the more satisfying. It is this unique level design throughout the game that really sets this game apart from the rest of the series, and side-scrolling platformers in general.

Another major gameplay change is a new ability for Kirby: the Hypernova. This amplifies Kirby's suction power to where he can suck up almost anything, including parts of the environment. This power can also be used to move large, heavy objects to solve puzzles, such as giant snowballs and wrecking balls. Whether used to solve puzzles, eat enemies, take down mini-bosses, or just clear the path, this technique is very fun to use. Additionally, this technique is used a lot throughout the game, so you'll get a lot of experience with it, compared to the Mega Eggdozer in Yoshi's New Island, which was only used here and there, and in very simple ways. All these positives being said, though, there is one thing that bugged me about it: it's a bit too overpowered. There's one point in the game where suped-up versions of mini-bosses are made short work of with the Hypernova. Hypernova is also the only ability that cannot be dropped, even if you die. While overall a fun concept, it just felt too powerful on occasion.

The game's boss battles are some of the best in the series. They all utilize the 2.5D level design that makes the whole game great. Their attacks weave between layers of the area, they shift between these layers, and sometimes you have to shift with them. While I don't want to spoil too much, I will use an obvious boss as an example. While Whispy Woods does not appear, the very similar Flowery Woods does. It starts out seeming simple, but he eventually shifts to the background, and you have to hit his roots when he attacks. Throwing his fruits and flowers at you from the background, you'll need good judgment to avoid these attacks and strike back appropriately. Even for a pretty easy and simple game at first glance, the boss battles are surprisingly-advanced.

To run through the main game, you'll take about 10 hours, more or less. But that's not all this game has to offer. Right from the start, two alternate game modes are available. The first is Kirby Fighters: a fighting mini-game similar to Super Smash Bros. that utilizes different colored Kirbies with a selection of abilities. I had a lot of fun with this mode, and this mode is required to be played for 100%. It has local multiplayer, but I was disappointed by the lack of online play, as this would have been perfect for online. Overall, though, if you have people nearby to play it with, you'll spend a lot of time with this one; it's great! The second mode is Dedede's Drum Dash. This one, I wasn't as impressed by. You play as King Dedede bouncing across drums and collecting coins to the rhythm of the level's theme. While good, it just doesn't have much to it, as some of the stages are ridiculously-unforgiving, and there's not much reason to replay the levels. It just doesn't match quality rhythm games like HarmoKnight. Some other modes are available in the post-game, and while I won't spoil what they are, they add a lot of life to the game, and are very challenging. Overall, these extra modes add quite a bit of content, which, combined with the game's 256 collectible keychains, make getting 100% a very challenging task.

Great level design and boss battles, replay value, a fun but admittedly-overpowered central ability, and our favorite pink puffball come together to form a great game. While I wish the extra modes had some online play, especially Kirby Fighters, the game left me very satisfied. I highly recommend it.

Rating: 9/10 (displayed here as 5 stars)
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