Kiss the Dust and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$7.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: book in Good Condition; light wear to book edges and pages. Hard Cover
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Kiss the Dust: 2 Hardcover – April 23, 1992


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$12.00 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Juvenile (April 23, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525448934
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525448938
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,869,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Laird weaves compelling facts about the conflicts between the Arabs and the Kurds into her gripping tale about one family's escape to freedom. After witnessing a teen's brutal murder and meeting a wounded revolutionary, 12-year-old Tara begins to realize the extent of persecution in her native Iraq. When her Kurdish father is sought by the secret police, Tara and her family abandon their home and head north to the mountains. Their refuge is short-lived, however; bombs begin to drop and they flee across the Iranian border to a primitive refugee camp. Stripped of their dignity and still not out of danger, the family plots to leave the continent, despite slim chances of asylum. The author personalizes the Kurdish experience by sensitively portraying Tara's feelings of loss, degradation and uprootedness. Although some readers may find the girl's initial naivete as hard to swallow as her abrupt awakening to violence, most will overlook these minor weaknesses as the story's tension rapidly mounts. Even those familiar with political problems in Iraq and Iran may be shocked by the graphic depiction of tyranny--and may sense that despite their hardships, Tara's family fares better than many people who risk their lives for independence. Ages 10-up.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

Here, Laird, author of a poignant first novel about the effects of a hydrocephalic baby on his family (Loving Ben, 1989), portrays the journey of a Kurdish refugee family--a story based on the real experiences in the mid-80's of Iraqi Kurds now living in England. For Tara, 13, and her family, their ordeal is cruel and often life-threatening, yet they are among the lucky ones. Wealthy ``Baba'' (secretly a power in the Kurdish military) still has money even after repeated searches, while ``Daya'' manages to smuggle her jewels. Escaping the police as they leave their luxurious home in a city in northern Iraq, they take a taxi to their primitive vacation house in the mountains. For Tara, the return to village ways is almost as much of a shock as the bombs that eventually drive the family over the border into Iran, to a refugee camp infested with bedbugs and assaulted by deafening prayers rasped from a loudspeaker. Eventually, Baba makes contact with relatives in Teheran and passage to London is negotiated. Ever-present dangers maintain suspense--from a brutal street-killing Tara witnesses to her older brother's miraculous escape; meanwhile, Laird builds a sympathetic picture of the embattled Kurds and a compelling portrait of Tara and the sobering changes wrought in her and her family by the events, including her first startled response to a free society (``attractive and exciting...but frightening...as if things might suddenly get out of control''). An important contribution to the growing number of refugee stories. (Fiction. 10+) -- Copyright ©1992, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Again, the author neglects detail, concocting a very superficial composition.
Yifei Chen
The story had us all gasping with identification as these blessed children in rural New Zealand imagined a life in turmoil.
Fiona
In what should have been some of the most exciting parts of the book, I felt kind of bored and ready to "get on with it."
Allyn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Allyn on August 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
Tara Hawrami is a thirteen-year-old girl living in Iraq in the 1980's. She has what we would call a normal life-living in a nice house, going shopping with her best friend, and having the mistaken feeling that nothing particularly bad is going to happen to her. But then the inevitable comes. Tara has always known that she was a Kurd, and has maybe even faintly known that Kurds are hated by the Iraqi goverment...but one day, when walking home from school, she sees a teenaged Kurdish boy die for his beliefs.
Things all happen in short order after that, and the Hawramis, who find themselves dodging the Iraqi government, find themselves living in a remote Kurdish village that is unlike anything they have ever known. The journey continues when the village becomes the target of brutal bombing raids, and it seems that the family must become refugees in order to escape danger. Experiences in two refugee camps follow, and Tara and her family wonder if their life will ever be what it was before.
As I said before, I was disappointed with this book. It seems as if the author had a very promising topic and a character that could potentially make the story seem real to readers. But something seems flawed in this book. Laird's writing style is somehow "detached" and it doesn't really feel like you are "right there" (which is how it should in a good book). In what should have been some of the most exciting parts of the book, I felt kind of bored and ready to "get on with it." Character development seems a little weak, too. We never seemed to really get to know Tara-there was too much time spent telling what she did, not enough time spent telling what she thought.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "bawkishowan" on February 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a wealthy intellectual Kurd, I always find difficulties in telling my peers about the sufferings of my people. There are millions of Kurdish refugees "suffering" around the world and host countries should have some background idea about where they come from and why they left the comfort of their homeland. To me, this book came as a God's blessing so that to order tens of copies to every friend who ever asked me about my ethnic origin and why I am not serving my people.I am just finished with A Kurdish review on the book in the most widely circulated Kurdish newspaper. If you ever come across with a Kurd in your civilized world and feel bad about living on your tax payments, please read this book to realize that "Tara" and her examples were not beggars; they were just victims of this crazy world. The author should be congratulated for this outstanding work. She seems to know more of our culture than many of the true nationals. She must have lived between us for years to come up with this three dimentional insight into our culture, emotions and feelings. The book is very readable and of the right size. The cover is impeccable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Fiona on April 6, 2002
Format: School & Library Binding
I read this book to my students in a sole-charge school when the setting was still hot in the news, back in the early 90s. The story had us all gasping with identification as these blessed children in rural New Zealand imagined a life in turmoil. We still remember the pleasant life and then the flight over the mountains in the night.
This books sits with Ann Holm's "I Am David", or Ian Seraillier's "The Silver Sword", as a novel that will help children understand the human suffering behind world politics and the nightly news. History is being made every day and World War Two is not the only history that gets a break in literature.
Our discussions, our map work, our search for photographs of the region and the culture made this a rich reading experience indeed and I whole heartedly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
I thought KISS THE DUST was a very good book. It's about a girl
named TARA and her family. One afternoon a soldier comes to their house. TARA's father was sick. The solier tells BABA the police are looking for him.SO they have to move away from their home.Most of the book is about them moving around the world and their problems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Norma Glock on March 9, 1998
Format: Paperback
Kiss the Dust is an exciting story of a girl ,Tara, who's father is into problems with the secret police. The family must move around a lot and taa runs into different problems and scary situations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 6, 1997
Format: Paperback
I thought this was an extraordinary book! It was packed with
adventure, and every moment made you want to read more!
This book never slows down, and with a slight variation
of the amount of excitment here and there, I would say
this book was almost all excitement. The author explains each
character so well, and each scene and feeling so emotionally,
you realy begin to think of yourself in the same situation
as the characters.
The one thing I did not like about the book was the
ending. For the end of a story, there should be a last sentence
that wraps things up;this book just didn't have it. But other
than that, I highly recommend this book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Christianna Demars on February 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read this for a school project. As I have read this it felt like the world ended and a chance kept being born. Tara the main character was an amazing piece to the story. This book was great and I enjoyed reading it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?