Kissing Fish and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$17.99
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $2.00 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.03
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Kissing Fish: Christianity for People Who Don't Like Christianity Paperback – January 10, 2011


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.99
$16.87 $15.00


Frequently Bought Together

Kissing Fish: Christianity for People Who Don't Like Christianity + Living the Questions: The Wisdom of Progressive Christianity + Saving Jesus from the Church: How to Stop Worshiping Christ and Start Following Jesus
Price for all three: $43.89

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 397 pages
  • Publisher: Xlibris, Corp. (January 10, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1456839403
  • ISBN-13: 978-1456839406
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #266,040 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roger Wayne Wolsey is a free-spirited GenX-er who thinks and feels a lot about God and Jesus. He's a Christian, yet he identifies with people who consider themselves as being "Spiritual, but not Religious." He grew up during the "Minneapolis sound" era and enjoyed seeing The Replacements, The Jayhawks, Husker Du, The Wallets, Trip Shakespeare, Prince, and Soul Asylum in concert - leading to strong musical influences in his theology. Roger double majored in philosophy and political science and graduated magna cum laude from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN. He was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honorary society. He earned his Masters of Divinity degree at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, CO. Roger is an ordained pastor in the United Methodist Church. He currently serves as the director of the Wesley Foundation campus ministry at C.U. in Boulder, CO. He was married for ten years, divorced in 2005, and co-parents a delightful little boy. Roger loves live music, dancing, rock-climbing, trail-running with his dog Kingdom, yoga, camping, hosting house concerts, riding his motorcycle, and playing his trumpet. Roger currently serves on the Board of Directors for Her Many Voices and the Boulder International Fringe Festival. Roger also blogs for Elephant Journal - an online magazine for the Buddhist and Yoga communities.

More About the Author


Roger Wayne Wolsey is a free spirit who thinks and feels a lot about God and Jesus. He's a progressive Christian who identifies with people who consider themselves "spiritual, but not religious." A trumpeter, Roger grew up during the "Minneapolis Sound" era of the 1980s and '90s. These experiences contribute to a musical approach to his theology. Roger studied philosophy and political science, graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN, and earned a Master of Divinity degree at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, CO. Roger is an ordained pastor in the United Methodist Church. He has taught Introduction to Religion classes as an adjunct instructor at Graceland University in Lamoni, IA. He has served as a pastor for churches in Minnesota, Iowa and Colorado. He currently serves as the Director of the Wesley Foundation campus ministry at the University of Colorado in Boulder, CO. Roger was married for ten years, divorced, and co-parents a delightful child. He loves music, yoga, dancing, rock-climbing, motorcycling, trail running with his dog Kingdom, and hosting house concerts. Roger on the board of directors of the Boulder International Fringe Festival and blogs for Patheos, Elephant Journal, and Huffington Post.

A word from the author:

A big part of why many are leaving the Church is because they aren't aware of progressive Christianity or progressive Christian congregations. Granted, this isn't the only reason - but it's tragic that so many folks aren't aware that there is a form of the faith that many of them would actually like a lot.

Whether or not there is a literal heaven, we are Christians not for the sake of some future reward/glory, but rather for the sake of living faithfully to Jesus and his Way here and now -- for the sake of experiencing and partaking in salvation/wholeness and the Kingdom of God here and now. Faith isn't fire insurance to avoid going to "hell." We seek to follow the religion *of* Jesus not the religion *about* him.

Progressive Christians believe that Jesus *is* "the way, the truth, and the life," and we believe that all who follow Jesus' teaching, Way, and example, by whatever name, and even if they've never even heard of Jesus, are fellow brothers and sisters in Christ and his Way.

That said, we're rather enamored by the uniqueness of the Jesus story and we invite others to join us in sharing that specific journey -- even if we feel no dire need to convert them.

It is this non-exclusive approach to our faith that many young adults find compelling. So we're evangelistic even as we're not. ; )

Ultimately, let's just be as faithful as we can and not worry about "the Church dying." We have no fear of death for we follow a savior who gave it all up for the sake of others. Indeed, if we do anything to "attract" people out of desperation on our part, it'll be fruitless. It's like dating someone who is insecure and anxious -- not attractive. Let's just boldly be who were are -- and maybe even more so -- yes, more so.

blessings,

Roger Wolsey, author, "Kissing Fish: christianity for people who don't like christianity"

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
30
4 star
15
3 star
2
2 star
5
1 star
0
See all 52 customer reviews
I am amazed that I can put a title to my beliefs - I am, without a doubt, a Progressive Christian!
Alex & Tammy
If you have ever felt marginalized, judged, or criticized, this book will go a long way towards making you feel accepted and loved for who you are.
Mark Twain
With his conversational writing style you do not need to be steeped in theology to read and understand this book.
Wayne A. Laws

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By S. Nunnally on June 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
I just finished a really interesting book yesterday. It's by Roger Wolsey and it's called Kissing Fish. The book is somewhat of a spiritual manifesto on a movement that is taking shape in America: Progressive Christianity. Notice I didn't say liberal Christianity or modern or postmodern. I said progressive. Roger is an extremely approachable guy. He's ordained Methodist and ministers at the Boulder campus of the University of Colorado - a place not exactly known as a bastion for conservative Christianity. And that's what I like about this book: it gives real and practical thoughts about ministering to a generation where they are, not where we think they should be.

Roger puts it this way in his opening chapter: "I discovered the disappointing gap between idealistic notions of what the Church can and could be - and the decidedly non-ideal, petty, political, conflicted, dysfunctional beautiful messes that most of them are" (45). Hopefully, that doesn't put you off...particularly since Paul Tillich voiced similar sentiments in his History of Christian Thought: "...the gap between its claim and its reality." Anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski has said the same about primitive religions. So, Roger is in good company.

Progressive Christianity seeks to develop a something other than a religion about Jesus. It focuses on the religion of Jesus: "his actual beliefs, practices, and lifestyle" (58). Sanctification is at its core: the slow gradual growth towards Christ-likeness in individual piety and social justice. Not one of the other. Both. Progressive Christianity is more tolerant for the sake of inclusion, reconciliation, and healing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on January 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
I cannot recommend this book enough...it is so very good!!! The author is well-versed with biblical scripture and explains how Jesus' message of love in the gospels can be applied to the present day. If you have ever felt marginalized, judged, or criticized, this book will go a long way towards making you feel accepted and loved for who you are. It also offers advice about how to live more purposefully in terms of spiritual practices and helping others in this world. It's very therapeutic. People who will especially be attracted to this book: 1) Those who were raised in a church that made them feel rejected or judged; 2) People who want to read about a broader perspective on Christianity compared to what the media talks about; 3) Non-Christians who would like to learn about how they can work together with open-minded Christians to better the world around them; 4) Young people who struggle to connect with a church but want to grow in their faith. The writing style is very accessible, personal, thoughtful, and entertaining. You will enjoy this book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Small Town Girl on June 1, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
i have always been a little insecure about my faith. mainly due to the fact that i have not really seen eye to eye with some of the conservative values i was presented with growing up, and this had made me wander away from Christianity as a whole and become strictly a follower of Jesus; however, this book was a cool breeze on a hot day... it was sweet music to my ear... it made me realize that i wasn't as crazy as i had been told i had been. i have found progressive Christianity to be my fit.

bottom line-- this book was so encouraging, and i will be recommending it to all i come in contact with. :D
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By William Colburn on August 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
What picture comes to mind when you hear the word `Christian'?

Though the media prefers to present the shrill and abrasively loud fundamentalist voices within the faith, Christianity isn't a monolithic religion by a long shot. In fact, there have always been, ironically, rather vicious battles among Christians over what defines orthodoxy and, consequently, heresy.

Rogers new book tackles the job of differentiating conservative Christianity from progressive Christianity. He makes it clear that neither category is uniform in its beliefs and practices, yet there are characteristics that are unique to conservative and progressive ways of thinking. Though some basics remain the same, thus the `Christian' moniker, the differences are so well defined that they are, for all intents and purposes, two religions.

Roger isn't at all squeamish when it comes to discussing the difficult issues. Conservatives and progressives have different pictures of God, what happened on the cross, the nature of sin, the origins of life, how to interpret scripture, what it means to be `saved', their notions of heaven and hell, the origin of evil, and what is meant by `the end'.

Here is why you should to read this book. If you are an honest follower of Jesus, you ought to understand both sides of the major issues that face and divide Christianity in the 21st century. If you are a progressive, you need to have clarity on conservative talking points. Don't assume you know. There is only one `body' of Christ, the church, and we would all do well to at least seek to understand one another - maybe even to `love one another'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search