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Kitchen Witchery: A Compendium of Oils, Unguents, Incense, Tinctures, and Comestibles Paperback – May 1, 2002

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marilyn Daniel is an ordained Wiccan High Priestess. She founded the Temple of the Diving Dragons in Amarillo, Texas, and has been practicing witchcraft ever since she was a young child. This is her first book.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Weiser Books (May 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578631890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578631896
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,456,973 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Dell Taylor on April 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
I purchased Kitchen Witchery from a local bookstore and returned it the next day. Normally a fan of Weiser books, I was shocked to find blatant plagiarism of so many other (mostly Llewellyn) books. This book is a mixture of the entire Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews by Scott Cunningham with a few other sources from authors Laurie Cabot and the Farrars. Daniel has so very thinly paraphrased Cunningham's own words (example: "always stir clockwise" becomes rewritten as "stir clockwise always") that I am amazed this was published by such a reputable firm as Weiser. The worst part of this collection of "secrets" is that Daniel has listed identitcal recipes from other authors but CHANGED THE INGREDIENT AMOUNTS as well as left out important information about safe handling of the ingredients. This book reads like a garbled online Book of Shadows and is an insult to the hard work done by the authors listed in Daniel's bibliography.
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Kindling CandleBrew on November 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
Many times I have picked up this book to purchase it and then put it down again. The recipes are tempting and many, but I have a few problems with the author. I have borrowed this book from friends, but when it comes to endorsing it with my purchase, a little red flag goes up.
I am not new to witchcraft, and a lot of the instructions seem overly ritualistic to me. "Always stir in a clockwise direction" comes to mind. Daniel makes it sound as if the form and technique are more important than the function, and rarely if ever describes magical intent and the true purpose behind one's ritualistic endeavors (that is, self-programming to bring about change).
Daniel tends to lead a reader to think that if her precise instructions are not followed, the "spell" will not work. This is not a commonly held belief in the pagan traditions -- it is widely acknowledged that "magic" things happen because you have brought the change from within. In this regard, she can greatly confuse a person who is trying to find out more about the practical practise of Wicca or witchcraft. Perhaps Daniel is a highly ritualistic person herself, but she should at least mention that she is not following the mainstream traditions. Yes, many do think you can add power by stirring a certain way, but if you happen to act otherwise, it's not the end of the world because what really matters is one's focus and determination to bring about the change.
There are many fragrant and useful recipes compiled within. However, I believe I have seen most of them published in other people's works (Scott Cunningham and Laurie Cabot, for starters, and there are many more).
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Elemental 1 on September 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
I own this book, I would have returned it but the cover got damaged. As previous reviewers have stated this book is pretty much nothing but plagiarism. 400 recipes, several of which Iam looking at right now in Cunningham's Incense, Oils & Brews, the only difference between many of the recipes is the proportions and the difference is 1 drop for each component oil. While it's nice to have one book to refer to, spend the extra money and buy the originals (Cunningham, Cabot, Farrar) at least that way the proper people, or their estates, get the money and maybe someone elses life work won't get ripped off.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Witch on May 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
>>>In addition to advice for buying, storing, and blending essential oils (always stir clockwise), Marilyn reveals her secrets for making incense, bath salts, soaps, ointments, potpourri, ink, and more.<<<
Well, not only do the vast majority of these recipes come from (or are barely alterations of) Cunningham's work, this "secret" to "always stir clockwise" also comes directly from Cunningham's "The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews" in which he also gives advice on "buying, storing & blending essential oils" as a trained aromatherapist. What can also be found in this book, verbatum, are Cunningham's "Tables for Magickal Substitution", and several recipes from from Laurie Cabot's work, among others. One such glaring example was what Marilyn titles "Organic Love Potions". She states: "Combine any 3 of the following ingrednients in 1 cup of water: apples, cloves, cinnamon, lovage-root powder, yarrow flowers, strawberry oil, patchouli Oil, or musk oil." This exact recipe can be found in Laurie Cabot's book "Power Of The Witch", thusly (published more than a decade prior), "A bewitching, organic, perfume starts with herbs and spices. Simmer any three of the following ingredients in a cup or two of spring water with a tablespoon of sea salt: apples, cloves, cinnamon, lovage-root powder, yarrow flowers, strawberry oil, patchouli Oil, or musk oil." And, no credit is given to any of the authors for their own creative genius. So, as unkind as it may sound, this is a work of pure plagiarism. In fact, I owned my copy for a total of 15 minutes. Until I gave this book a closer look. Needless to say, I returned it for a prompt refund, stating exactly why, to the management. I also saw many of the Farrar's recipes included, as well.
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