Your Garage botysf16 Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it Eli Paperboy Fire TV Stick Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer WienerDog WienerDog WienerDog  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis Segway miniPro

Style Name: Pasta Excellence Set|Change
Price:$373.00+ Free shipping
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on January 19, 2002
I have had every kind of pasta roller - the chrome manual kind, the one that does everything (mixes, extrudes) and now this. I LOVE it. I love having my hands free to hold the dough going in and coming out and not having the manual roller shift all over the place. I am amazed how thin I can make the dough - tissue paper-thin. My only complaint, and I make it for the sake of completeness, is the fact that it took SEVERAL batches of dough (the first of which I was willing to sacrifice) to "clean" it out. I noticed what looked like metallic deposits all over my dough, especially on the edges. This was very distressing to me. I tried wiping the roller with a towel (for about an hour), I tried rubbing it with olive oil and I tried dusting it with flour, all of which helped, but it was ridiculous how much time I had to spend and how many batches of dough I had to waste (about four)! Overall, however, I am very pleased, but I think they should include in the instructions a statement to the effect that you should expect to see the deposits and how to clean it, or they should make sure it's cleaner before sending it out!
1616 comments|1,287 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 28, 2004
I highly recommend this attachment.
This attachment is very well made (Made in Italy). It attaches, detaches and cleans up easily, and most importantly, it works very well. This device only makes flat pasta so if you want rigatoni or penne, you'll be disappointed. I've made fettuccine and ravioli. After you've eaten home made semolina pasta, box pasta will never measure up. Be aware that making fettuccine is not that difficult but fresh ravioli is another story...it's quite a bit of work even with this machine. Making the filling and stuffing and sealing each ravioli is laborious. However, prior to getting this device, I used to use a hand crank machine. That's just way too much work. These rollers make the job manageable. The roller makes very consistent pasta, even when you use the thin settings.
My suggestion for a good pasta recipe is :
2 cups Semolina flour
1 cup unbleached flour
3 eggs
½ teaspoon of salt
6 tablespoons of water (most recipes say 3 but that just doesn't work well.)
*Some recipes like the one that comes in the box with this attachment, recommend the use of oil. I have not tried that approach yet. It probably works fine too, you be the judge.
** Some process advice: mix the 2 flours in the Kitchen aid bowl using the paddle beater. Mix the eggs and water together with a whisk and slowly add them to the mixer while in motion on setting 2. After the big, kind if hard dough ball forms, stop and change over to the dough hook for a couple of minutes. If you make ravioli, you'll want flexible dough or you'll get cracking. If the dough cracks or if air is captured inside during the sealing process, they are garbage as they will come apart in the boiling water.
To get dough flexible enough that it doesn't crack while making the ravioli, be sure to cover the dough between the first and second rollings and not let it sit longer that 30 minutes. Here's where the oil recipes may have an advantage...also, a light coating of water will help make a good seal.
I also picked up the Villaware 10-Square Ravioli Maker from Amazon. It is a metal and plastic form that helps you make 10-2.5 inch square rav's at one time. It works well but 2.5 inch rav's are a bit small. You will also have a tough time getiing a sheet of rolled pasta out of the rollers that is wide enough to cover the form as the rollers are close to the same width as the form.
Good luck!
11 comment|590 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon January 30, 2006
I ran one ball of dough through the machine and I was done. No metal shavings, no grease, no discolored parts. I have only had my machine for 3 months so perhaps the manufacturer has listened to the complaints of those who purchased their machines longer ago and who had problems. A success story for quality control and buyer feedback??

A couple of tips. I thought that a low speed setting for the mixer would be most appropriate. Bad idea. I find that the best speed settings for the roller and slicing attachments are 3 or 4. If you go slower, you get a less regular texture. Too much quicker and the dough tears.

Not documented in the booklet that comes with the device is that you can widen the rollers a bit extra if you go clockwise a bit past 1. This is where I start my rolling. I usually put the ball of dough through this setting 2-3 times, folding it in half before each re-roll.

I then narrow the rollers 2 notches for each subsequent rolling until the desired thickness is achieved. I use the following settings for different types of pasta:
Ravioli - 4
Linguini - 6
Fetuccini - 5
'Broken Noodles' - 5

You can go thinner for things like angel hair pasta, but I usually prefer heartier pastas which Tuscan-inspired sauces.

Take note - if you are making pasta for a group larger than 3-4, or are otherwise not planning on taking it directly from the roller to boiling water, you will need a good pasta rack/dryer unless you have acres of counter space. If you attempt to accumulate your pasta in a 'pile' before cooking, you get a big blob of pasta-ish dough and you will need to completely re-roll it. Laying the pasta in a flat, single layer, is an option but I do not have that much counter space. I therefore use a pasta dryer to hang the pasta for a few minutes to a couple of hours until I am ready to boil it.

Updated June 3, 2009 - We have been using this now for just shy of 5 years and it still works very well. The device has been easy to maintain, there has been no build up of gunk even though you cannot wash it in soap and water, and the rollers are still spinning evenly despite semi-regular use.

Updated June 2010 - Still going strong!
88 comments|423 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 3, 2002
I decided to purchase this attachment instead of the other Kitchenaid pasta attachment (plates + food grinder) because I wanted to be able to make any kind of pasta: spinach, semolina, whole wheat, egg-free etc, and not be confined to a small number of recipes that were sure to work well with the plates. It has worked like a charm. Even the egg-free spinach pasta, which was very dry and crumbly to start, came out perfect.
The widest setting on the roller works to knead/roll the dough until its pliable enough to continue. Its amazing how such flaky dough can become so evenly mixed with minimal effort. From this point, its just a few more settings until you've got angel-hair thin dough. It is important to use the cutter before the ends of your dough dry out, lest they will clog the cutter.
Pasta is my favorite food, and this contraption makes it possible to make my own healthy, delicious pasta recipes at home, quickly!
11 comment|398 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 13, 2010
I just got done eating raviolis made by this ravioli maker. Due to all the negative reviews I had some trepidation but I always make up my own mind using the products myself. This ravioli maker was E-A-S-Y. None of my raviolis came undone in the water. I do admit I only put 2 raviolis to boil for the 5 minutes as a test, they turned out fine so I threw the whole batch in the water. This machine is fabulous. I thinned the dough out to #5, pricked a hole in each ravioli and it came out delicious. Not a single one burst while cooking. I made a shrimp, cream cheese, ricotta, garlic, cracked pepper and sea salt filling. I added a little cottage cheese as it strings like mozzarella when hot. This is not my first time making pasta but it was my first time using the ravioli maker. I give this machine a 5.
0Comment|110 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon October 25, 2010
I ran one ball of dough through the machine and I was done. No metal shavings, no grease, no discolored parts. I have only had my machine for 5 years now. Many of the reviews citing problems with this device are older than that, so perhaps the manufacturer listened to the complaints of those who purchased their machines longer ago and who had problems. A success story for quality control and buyer feedback??

A couple of tips. I thought that a low speed setting for the mixer would be most appropriate. Bad idea. I find that the best speed settings for the roller and slicing attachments are 3 or 4. If you go slower, you get a less regular texture. Too much quicker and the dough tears.

Not documented in the booklet that comes with the device is that you can widen the rollers a bit extra if you go clockwise a bit past 1. This is where I start my rolling. I usually put the ball of dough through this setting 2-3 times, folding it in half before each re-roll.

I then narrow the rollers 2 notches for each subsequent rolling until the desired thickness is achieved. I use the following settings for different types of pasta:
Ravioli - 4
Linguini - 6
Fetuccini - 5
'Broken Noodles' - 5

You can go thinner for things like angel hair pasta, but I usually prefer heartier pastas which Tuscan-inspired sauces.

Take note - if you are making pasta for a group larger than 3-4, or are otherwise not planning on taking it directly from the roller to boiling water, you will need a good pasta rack/dryer unless you have acres of counter space. If you attempt to accumulate your pasta in a 'pile' before cooking, you get a big blob of pasta-ish dough and you will need to completely re-roll it. Laying the pasta in a flat, single layer, is an option but I do not have that much counter space. I therefore use a pasta dryer to hang the pasta for a few minutes to a couple of hours until I am ready to boil it.

Updated June 3, 2009 - We have been using this now for just shy of 5 years and it still works very well. The device has been easy to maintain, there has been no build up of gunk even though you cannot wash it in soap and water, and the rollers are still spinning evenly despite semi-regular use.

Updated June 2010 - Still going strong!
33 comments|138 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 28, 2011
These reviewers may be accurate for his/her experience, but not an ACCURATE REVIEW of the product.

I read all the negative reviews before purchasing. I now have all the pasta attachments that KA sells. I love them all, including the Ravioli Maker. KitchenAid publishes the recipe in the book that comes with the maker. 1 Tablespoon of water is correct. When you mix the dough in the bowl of your stand mixer, use ONLY the flat beater and only use it until the liquid is absorbed by the flour. You DO NOT use the dough hook to kneed the dough, you use the rollers (sold sep.). The dough will look dry and "raggy", but dump it out onto a board and bring it together. It will form a disk nicely. Then wrap it in plastic wrap and leave for 30 minutes to rest. Then cut it into 4 pieces. Wrap the other 3 back in the plastic wrap and keep covered. Form the piece you just cut into a ball and then using the palm of your hand, flatten into a disc. The edges need to be THIN, so they fit into your roller.

Attach the ROLLER to your stand mixer. Set the machine between 3-4 on speed and feed the disc of dough into the rollers. It will probably "tear" down the middle of the dough....DON'T WORRY!!! Just fold it in half and re-feed the dough, starting with the FLAT EDGE. You will need to do this about 10-15 times. Every 3-4 times, I fold the sheet into thirds, to make a narrow rectangle and start through the rollers again. After awhile, the dough will be very pliable and slightly leathery. It should not be sticky. If it is, dust with flour. After you see the "difference" (very easy to see), run it through, folding in half each time, until the dough is the width of the rollers. THEN, change the rollers to 2 and run it through once, then again on 3 and STOP!!! You MUST stop at 3 for the ravioli maker to work. Trim the ends square and fold in half the long way.

NOW....change the rollers (DO NOT roll out the other pasta wedges at this time - the dough MUST be very fresh, not dry) Pull out the Hopper and place the folded edge of your pasta into the ravioli rollers and turn SLIGHTLY, so it grabs the pasta. Put the hopper in. Put about 3 scoops of filling into the hopper, and using the provided spoon, tamp it down into the bottom of the pasta sheets. The filling must be FINE, NOT CHUNKY, and cold. Slowly turn the ravioli maker to start the process. After 1-2 rows of ravioli are made, re-tamp the filling into the bottom, spreading it out to the edges. Add more filling when needed. DO NOT FILL THE HOPPER FULL!!! Keep adding filling until you reach the end of the pasta sheets. BEFORE sealing the final row, remove any extra filling so it dose not go everywhere, making a mess. When you reach the end of the dough, place the filled ravioli on a towel to start drying. DO NOT TRY TO SEPARATE RIGHT NOW!! Let the ravioli dry for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, start the next batch - repeating these instructions. Each sheet of pasta should make about 21-24 ravioli. There will be slight waste. Don't sweat it. You can keep the attached ravioli in the fridge, uncovered, to dry. Then separate and either freeze or cook.

Today I made over 400 ravioli, with 4 different fillings. I DID NOT HAVE ONE THAT DIDN'T SEAL. Not ONE out of over 400!!!!! I cooked dinner for my family, using about 60 of the mixed ravioli. I boiled for about 7 minutes. They turned out perfect. Not one burst open in the water.

The negative reveiws MUST be due to chef error and they are blaming KitchenAid and the attachemnt. JUST WRONG!!!

Please feel free to ask questions if you have any. I'll help any who ask.
55 comments|145 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 16, 2008
I purchased this item because the original roller attachment from the three-piece set I received over three years ago finally broke. Please bear in mind that I make more pasta than 99% of those who will buy this machine - usually FOUR dozens eggs worth per session (every month or so) - I did not hesitate to buy another.

It works perfectly! It also seems that they have made some changes since the last model. The copper scraper-plates where the dough is extracted have been changed to plastic (this actually is a GOOD thing, as little bits of copper will not get into your noodles if they break off). Also I have heard that they changed the gears from plastic to metal (another plus for durability if it is true).

My last model was on its way out for a LONG time (you could hear it), and when I used this one I had realized how quiet it used to be when working!
33 comments|145 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 17, 2010
I read a lot of the reviews, and bought this anyway, but was unsure. I figured what they heck, but it was what some of the positive reviews said that made me decide to get it.

I'm glad I did. I just used it, and wow, it was fun (if you like to cook), and easy. I did mess up a little, which turned out to make a small percentage of mine to not be sealed, but that was user error. But the main thing here is....I did not have to seal a single ravioli, and they cooked up just fine.

Most important things to do;
*roll pasta sheets to #3 on the pasta sheet roller....period.
*watch the youtube video with peter pasta. He has two videos, almost that same, but one actually says what settings he is using, which is THREE!!
*read the instructions that come with it....twice.

Simple huh? First and foremost, regardless of what recipe one uses and what they say to do, the setting for the pasta sheets is 3, not 5, not 7, not 42, but 3 - why reviewers complained when they set it to 5 or higher, I have no idea. Peter Pasta video AND the instructions say this is required for the raviolis to seal correctly. Maybe if you have a special pasta rolling pin, and hand make them, then they can be made thinner, but not for this machine.

Now, does this mean the the raviolis will be too thick and maybe doughy....nope. I think it's because the way the thing works, it stretches the dough a bit in the process.

While the unit is hand cranked, it's not that big of a deal.....and I'm not sure I would want it to be powered....it sucks the filling in quick enough as it is. I'm cooking for two, not 20. I made 4 dozen ravioli in just minutes...out of the three steps (mix dough, mix filling, roll dough, and making ravioli), making the ravioli was the quickest (even my first time).

There will be a bit of wasted dough, as there is the first set to get the dough started and there are three stripes along the length that get torn off (that separate the ravioli length wise). But, you can just roll it out and use it. The ravioli just tear apart, but don't try to speed along on the tearing part, or you tear them open a little like I did.

So what did I do wrong while operating the machine....well, I decided to make a bit more dough than I needed....then decided to turn it all into one sheet. My thought, once started in the machine, I would just make one continuous sheet of ravioli...how cool is that! The #3 sheet was about 5ft long, folded in half and started into the machine, a little over 2ft hanging down the sides. This made two problems. The first is that they were just too long to manage without stretching the dough - so i set the ends on the counter to hold the weight. This, as I found out later, slanted the sheets of dough through the feeder in the beginning, so the first 6 rows of ravioli, did not have dough on the one edge to pinch closed - though it did finish centering quickly enough. I only lost 6 ravioli out of...what, 4 dozen.

This also lead to another issue....which is why the instructions say only a certain amount, pesky instructions, I'm a guy, I don't need them. The ravioli eventually will get too heavy and start to stretch and tear off....after about foot or so of raviolis are made....which is about the distance to the counter...if you are not hanging the whole thing over the edge because you have a 5ft sheet of dough :-/ Try not to stretch the raviolis this way, as it will make it harder to separate them...but only a bit.

Hope this helps. The unit works great, well made, it would be nice if they made these attachments easier to clean, but they do work very well. Assuming you can handle the expensive price, you will love the way it works.
44 comments|284 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 31, 2009
My wife and I received this pasta drying rack as a wedding gift along with various other KitchenAid products. If we hadn't have received it as a gift, I would have bought it and considered it $40 well spent.

The pasta rack is well designed and easy to deploy and pack up for storage. When you open it from the package all of the hanging rods are aligned with each other. Turn the black wheel at the top of the drying rack about one full turn and all of the hanging rods space themselves out evenly (see product picture). No need to position each hanging rod by hand, which would be a very tedious chore. Pull each of the feet down and then lift up on the ends to lock them in place.

Craftily designed to be stored in the top of the drying rack is a "transfer rod" which conforms to the hanging rods to allow you to transfer the pasta to each hanging rod. What we do is cut the pasta through our KitchenAid pasta plate running off the stand mixer and just before the pasta is nearly finished being cut, slide the transfer rod from one side of the pasta as it's hanging from the cutter plate to the other and then the pasta is now hanging from the rod. We then place the transfer rod on top of one of the hanging rods, twist the transfer rod 180 degrees and now the pasta is hanging from the drying rack.

The pasta rack easily held the amount of pasta produced by using the recipe in the KitchenAid pasta plate owners manual, which is suppose to yield 1-1/2 pounds of dough. Maybe a bit more room for pasta, but definitely not enough room for a full second batch.

The pasta rack is very stable and is made of stainless steel tube for the center column and legs. The bottom base is made of plastic along with the hanging rods, transfer rod, and turning wheel at the top. All the surfaces are very smooth and easy to clean with just a damp rag.

The pasta drying rack is made in Italy.
33 comments|110 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 236 answered questions


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.