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Who Knew? Things You Didn't Know About Things You Know Well Hardcover – June, 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Mjf Books (June 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567314422
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567314427
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #647,680 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Hoffman is the author of best-selling books The Joy of Pigging Out and Kid Stuff. He has worked in television for 20 years, as both a series writer and on-camera reporter covering trends and popular culture. He lives in Los Angeles. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

David Hoffman has been a television writer, a creative consultant, and an on-camera reporter for ABC and FOX covering trends and popular culture. He is the author of numerous pop culture books, including Kid Stuff, which celebrates classic toys, and The Easy-Bake Oven Gourmet. He lives in Los Angeles.

Customer Reviews

It wasn't even what is supposed ot be.
Amazon Junkie
Interesting book about everyday things we all know about, but have forgotten, easy to read and informative.
Barb Rajcich
Instead it is a worthless book with one line per page.
jsh

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By John VINE VOICE on September 18, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoy these type of books and found it to be full of interesting facts. I can't give it a higher rating however because, for the most part, this book has one fact per page. It's not like the page is full of a lot of background information either. A fact may consist of a single sentence. You can read the entire book in 10 or 15 minutes.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
"Not what I thought it would be. It has LARGE PRINT and only one sentence on each page alot of times. It did have some facinating fun facts. Thought it would be Home Tips. Wish I wouldn't have bought it. :( I will never be able to sell it for what I paid for it.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on October 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a very short book filled with tones of completely random and largely useless facts. It is another collection of trivia, and not a very large one at that - the book is only 196 pages long, and each "fact" (most of which are not longer than a single sentence) occupies a whole page. Moreover, many of the "facts" presented here are in fact fallacies that have been tossed around for so long that have come to be thought of as true.

The book provides some amusing material for those situations in life when you are not going anywhere, and yet don't have the time to read something of a substance - dentist's waiting room, hairdresser, bathroom, etc. It could also serve as an inexpensive gift for people that you don't care about all that much. Otherwise, it's a rather disappointing book.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Rakkwifey on March 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wasted money on this thought it was going to be a cute read but no it was a few useless facts half were not even remotely interesting
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Cari Jackson Lewis on October 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
The author asserts that Mr. Staub invented peanut butter. This is incorrect. While Staub patented a peanut butter making machine in 1903, it was Kellogg (yes, the Corn Flakes Kellogg) that popularized the "nut paste" that was the precursor of the peanut butter that we enjoy with our jelly today.

It would also have been prudent to acknowledge that renowned African-American scholar and scientist George Washington Carver is widely credited with the discovery of peanut butter.

However, while Carver invented over 300 uses for peanuts and approximately 118 uses for sweet potatoes in his efforts to decrease cotton farming and improve the commercial prospects for these alternative crops raised by predominantly black and poor rural farmers in the South, and while Carver's scientific and inventive prowess was acknowledged and sought after by American presidents, titans of industry like Henry Ford, and other international executives, Carver merely popularized the use of peanut butter and did not invent it. This would have been a more complete and accurate rendering of the history of peanut butter.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "Swiss Army JIM" on February 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A few little bits of trivia. I'm glad I didn't pay the cover price. It has been somewhat amusing, but I would not recommend the book.
Each (small format) page has one small item, each one about as long as this review. Who Knew?
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30 of 38 people found the following review helpful By TellMama on June 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
Did you know that Twinkies originally had banana-flavored filling in them rather than the vanilla we all know and love so well? They did, up until WWII when there was a banana shortage in the U.S. To quote the author, Who Knew? This is just one of the interesting tidbits of information you'll glean from this book. A must-read for any trivia lover, Who Knew? also makes enjoyable reading for the merely mildly curious. Have you ever wondered how Marilyn Monroe walked that walk? She lopped off the heel of one shoe! Highly recommended reading - and a great gift for those hard-to-buy-for folks on your gift list.
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24 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
What I loved about this book is that the information it contained was fresh and different from the typical trivia book. I first discovered it a year ago when a friend brought it along on a car trip and being confirmed know-it-alls, both of us were continually amused about what we didn't know (from the origins of popular phrases and products to tidbits about some of our favorite tv shows and movies). Since, I've given a number of copies as gifts. So I was extremely surprised when I read some of the dsigruntled reviews. Yes, there's only one factoid per page - but when they're all interesting, who cares? And I have to add this: The reader who claims the author said Jell-O emits brain waves, obviously misread the whole thing. What the book states is that "if Jell-O is hooked up to an EEG, it registers movements virtually identical to the brain waves of a healthy adult." The 'it' refers to the EEG - not the Jell-O! And for the record, this isn't urban folklore. Several years ago, the Smithsonian did a symposium on Jell-O (yes, the Smithsonian!). And they concur: It's the result of a study performed in 1993 by technicians at St. Jerome hospital in Batavia, NY, to confirm an earlier test by Dr. Adrian Upton. Hey, who knew?!?
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