REf Dictionaries Atlas Language Guides Writing Guides Learn more
Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $0.70 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: No writing or highlighting!Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang Paperback – October 19, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1841958347 ISBN-10: 1841958344

Buy New
Price: $13.30
8 New from $13.30 31 Used from $4.21
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.30
$13.30 $4.21

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang + The UK to USA Dictionary British English vs. American English + Brit-Think, Ameri-Think: A Transatlantic Survival Guide, Revised Edition
Price for all three: $30.08

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate U.S. (October 19, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841958344
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841958347
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hi,

I am Jonathan Bernstein. Not the crisis management expert. Not the guy who writes about helicopters. Or the one who knows about sector trading. Or any of the other ones that come up when you--or,more likely, I--look for Jonathan Bernstein. Not that I'm insulted when any of their names pop up. It gives me a second of feeling like an intelligent accomplished person of experience and ability. And then I look at my own list of published works and that feeling swiftly evaporates.

I am of little help in a crisis. Unless it's a crisis involving obscure 80s teen movies.I wrote a book about that called Pretty In Pink: The Golden Age of Teenage Movies. So my credentials are pretty good in that arena. Or if it's a problem to do with teenage superheroes who shoot fire from their fingers when they're upset. I've written two novels about that very subject. One called Hottie, the other, it's sequel Burning Ambition.

Currently, I'm co-author, along with my friend Lori Majewski, of the book Mad World: An Oral History Of The New Wave Artists And Songs That Defined The 1980s. That's a laborious subtitle. But it's not a laborious book. It features interviews with a whole platoon of the biggest stars of the last great period of pop music: the 1980s.

Mad World features chapters on Adam & The Ants, Duran Duran, Depeche Mode New Order, The Smiths, Echo & The Bunnymen, OMD, ABC, Bow Wow Wow, Thomas Dolby, INXS, Simple Minds, Dexys Midnight Runners, Thompson Twins, Berlin, Modern English, Howard Jones, Heaven 17 and a lot more.

I started writing about music at the end of the eighties for magazines like The Face and Blitz. I went on to work at Spin and have contributed to publications like Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, The Telegraph and Interview.

I also had a hand in writing screenplays for such modern classics as Jackie Chan's The Spy Next Door, Just My Luck starring Lindsay Lohan, Larry The Cable Guy: Health Inspector and Max Keeble's Big Move.

I was born in Glasgow, Scotland, moved to New York and currently reside in Los Angeles.



Customer Reviews

Chuckled my way through the book.
scuba lucy
This is a gift for my husband... he originally grew up in the UK but moved to America at the age of 15.
Stacey Comley
To see words that look and mean things so very different from the English I know.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Martin Edelweiss on October 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
Fans of Bernstein's Guardian column in the UK will be well-acquainted with his trenchant wit - on brilliant display here, too, as he tackles a potentially unwieldy subject. Where most dictionaries of this type are poorly written and dry as dust, "Knickers" handles both the well-known (e.g. the title) and the obscure (too many examples to list) linguistic peculiarities of the Queen's English with style. A must for Anglophiles and a rare treat for the casual reader and/or traveler.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Sam on July 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am completely, and utterly in love with England, every single aspect of it is lovely. I was surprised that a book on British Slang was out, I went out and bought it the very next day. As soon as I got home I stuffed it into my bag for school the next day. During one class when I had finished my work earlier I decided to open this book up, what a horrible decision! This book was absolutely hilarious! Which was bad since the rest of the class was finishing a test, and I had to leave the room to get rid of my laughter.

Now I use these terms all over the school that leaves other students stare at me with bewilderment. It's great to know terms that others are not familiar with.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Steffan Piper VINE VOICE on April 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
A very well compiled and concise collection of British slang and colloquial expressions that seemingly date back two hundred years. However a good fifty percent are more common to the last forty years and probably another thirty percent are the last fifteen to a close ten. While this tome might be devoid of the more obscure statements like: "Jimmy Hill", no one's going to notice or fault the compilers for it.

This is a good writers reference for anyone on the island or across the pond. Anyone interested in seeking other quality slang reference books can look here:

1. The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary

2. The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms

3. Urban Dictionary: Street Slang Defined

4. Depraved and Insulting English

5. The Highly Selective Dictionary For The Extraordinarily Literate

6. The Oxford Dictionary of Allusions

7. How Not To Say What You Mean: A Dictionary of Euphemisms

Got that, Gaffer? Cheers, me old son!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By scuba lucy on September 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am originally from England and have been living in Mexico for 5 years. I am in contact with Americans and Canadians all day every day and had reformed my speach to be understood....After reading this book I realized how many words I have lost in my vocabulary and have since started using them again whether people understand me or not! Chuckled my way through the book. Great book very accurate and not outdated! Makes a change from the books that think all English people are living in cockney London in the 18 hundreds!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kathleen Calaway on November 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
This was one of the biggest disappointments in my reading life. I love British TV and humour, so have gone all out on books about social history and culture. This was so poorly written that some of the definitions appear to have been pulled out of a hat (I am referring mostly to the US equivalents). Some slang words and phrases gave an example; most did not (oddly, there were a few that seemed to merit half a page). The examples were very poor. Here is one of the worst: "Toad in the Hole; pork sausages covered in batter. U.S. equivalent: Toad the Wet Sprocket." WAAAAHT???? Many of the words or phrases would be familiar to anyone (same in both cultures) and didn't really need to be included, while others were missing that should have been included. Wow! Don't buy this book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tom Triumph on September 12, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoy watching British comedies and my wife spent some time in Scotland, so I was looking for a treasure trove of slang that was not such common knowledge. On this point I was disappointed. If you have watched enough episodes of BBCAmerica you will have heard most of it.

Similarly, I was expecting a bit more depth to the list; perhaps some back story, history or examples from popular culture. Instead, it has a few pages for each section; sections revolve around food, sex, travel and the like. There is no background on the subject; it is a list of terms and their meaning. The author tries to be light and funny, but after the tenth "definition" it gets stale.

So, the lack of anything new word-wise combined with the lack of anything knew about those words makes for a dull book.

Good for those who know little about the language or don't watch British shows.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. Dodd on April 4, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Knickers in a Twist: A Dictionary of British Slang

Although some of the phrases mentioned in the book are widely used in the USA, it still is a very interesting and educational book for the about-to- be tourist, or just English movie fan. I know I found out what "bobby dazzler" means.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Just a Guy on December 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Unfortunately this "dictionary" is not arranged as a dictionary but as a series of articles. It is not indexed like a dictionary so it is not searchable. It is unfortunate because the writing is fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search