Knights of the Round Table 1954 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(54) IMDb 6.3/10

The legend of King Arthur comes alive in this Oscar-nominated picture starring Ava Gardner as Lady Guinevere, Robert Taylor as Sir Lancelot and Mel Ferrer as the noble King Arthur.

Starring:
Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner
Runtime:
1 hour 56 minutes

Knights of the Round Table

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Adventure, Action
Director Richard Thorpe
Starring Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner
Supporting actors Mel Ferrer, Anne Crawford, Stanley Baker, Felix Aylmer, Maureen Swanson, Gabriel Woolf, Anthony Forwood, Robert Urquhart, Niall MacGinnis, Ann Hanslip, Jill Clifford, Stephen Vercoe, Julia Arnall, John Brooking, Michel De Lutry, Valentine Dyall, Gwendoline Evans, Peter Gawthorne
Studio MGM
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

There would be rioting in the streets.
Joseph Guyer
Merlin is there, but there is no "magic" to speak of.
Zorikh Lequidre
I felt this was by far the best movie out there.
Louise

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 62 people found the following review helpful By H. Hodgkin on January 15, 2005
Format: DVD
Well, folks, it was 1954. Not many of you were there, but speaking as someone who was 10 years old when he first saw this film, it was the "thing that dreams were made of." You have to look at films from the early fifties without reference to what you get today. Good special effects meant that he studio fans actually blew all of the costumes in the same directions. The studio system was about to die. Movies paid the bills with star's faces. A 10 year old went to see the story, and this is a great story. You can watch this movie. It isn't history, or fantasy. It is just a lot of fun from a time when you could set through it a second time for free if you called you mom and asked her not to come get you for two more hours. Put this in your collection and you can watch it once a year and enjoy it. And if you really want historical accuracy, this film is it. It is just exactly what films were all about in 1954 before TV came along and shrunk everything into one syllable.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Peter Kenney on July 12, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE is a movie about the classic tale of King Arthur, Sir Lancelot and Guinevere. Lancelot's ill-fated love for Guinevere is played out against a background of cavalry charges, fierce battles and pageantry. The plot is amplified by the rivalry between Lancelot and Mordred as well as Sir Percival's quest for the Holy Grail. Merlin appears in the film as an advisor to Arthur and Lancelot's wife dies while giving birth to the future Sir Gallahad.
Robert Taylor as Lancelot and Mel Ferrer as Arthur are both superb. Ava Gardner makes a beautiful Guinevere but her acting seems to be a little flat. The strong supporting cast includes Stanley Blake, Felix Aylmer and Robert Urguhart.
KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE received Academy Award nominations for Best Color, Art Direction and Sound. The main competition for Oscars in 1953 came from STALAG 17, ROMAN HOLIDAY and FROM HERE TO ETERNITY.
Richard Thorpe also directed Robert Taylor in IVANHOE in 1952.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Dujmovic VINE VOICE on November 6, 2005
Format: DVD
Three cheers to fellow reviewers who identified problems discerning adults will have with this film: the miscasting, the dull acting of Robert Taylor, the AWOL acting of Mel Ferrer, the bad accents, the lost plot threads (what about that Holy Grail?).

But for watching with a little boy, plastic sword in hand, this is great stuff. It's good where it needs to be good: the action, particularly the battle scenes; the scenery; the costumes and weaponry. Moreover, the talk of honor is done seriously, and the Christian piety expressed is a very good thing (and a rare thing, too, in films these days). One can talk around the business of adultery and talk about trust and promises and love on the one hand, and gossip and intrigue on the other. Overall, a delightful film for the young; my six year old son and I will be seeing this a few times. Recommended.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Nix Pix on July 2, 2003
Format: DVD
"Knights of the Round Table" was MGM's first feature in the newly christened widescreen format of Cinemascope and the studio's inexperience with a 2:35:1 aspect ratio, in retrospect, is rather obvious. The audience is treated to drawn out battle scenes (that are thrilling) and lavish spectacle. But the whole look and feel of the film is very theatrical, like Shakespeare on stage. Robert Taylor, usually so natural, is uncomfortably stiff as Lancelot, while Mel Ferrer fairs slightly better as King Arthur. Ava Gardner is wasted as Gueneviere. Sets and rear projection are glaringly obvious. Over all, for its historical context in the early days of widescreen film, more than entertainment value, "Knights" is a worthwhile movie.
Warner Home Video has given us a generally good looking print. No attempt has been made to remove age related artifacts from the negative. Overall, the quality of the transfer is very smooth though, at times, it can seem somewhat digitally harsh. Exterior footage tends to suffer from a considerable amount of film grain while interiors are well balanced. Black levels are perhaps a bit weak and fine details are lost in the darker scenes. Close ups look gorgeous. Long shots suffer from pixelization. Fades between scenes tend to suffer from a sudden grainy quality that is customary for all Cinemascope film stock of this period. The audio is stereo surround and amply provided for considering the limitations in the original recording.
EXTRAS: Mel Ferrer comments on the film's production. There's a featurette movietone trailer and the film's original theatrical trailer too.
OVER ALL: Not a bad movie but an incredibly dated one, "Knights of the Round Table" nevertheless offers up a good example of vintage Cinemascope film making from the 1950's.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By F. Healy on February 11, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
A very enjoyable movie about the legend of King Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere. Robert Taylor is perfect as Lancelot... noble and chivalrous, although human at the same time. Colorful and full of heraldry, if you like stories of the age of chivalry, you'll enjoy this.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Zorikh Lequidre on July 15, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Rule one of King Arthur stories: there is no "definitive" version. Every writer or filmaker adjusts the story to serve their audience and/or the point they are trying to make. That being said, this version was created to serve the Hollywood epic audience to tell a tragic story of love and war in the middle ages, and it does that job.
The story here follows Arthur gaining the throne and his friendship with Lancelot, both of which are threatened by Lancelot's love for the Queen, Guenevere, and the ambitions of Morgan, Arthur's half-sister, and her champion, Mordred. The film is filled with the kind of spectacle you would expect form a miod-'50's Cinemascope epic. There are battles, jousts, swordfights in woods, fields, castle steps, court pageantry, heraldry, court dancing, challenges, court intrigue, and a passionate kiss or two. Merlin is there, but there is no "magic" to speak of. He is there mostly as an advisor to Arthur.
The acting is rather stilted. Robert Taylor has about two expressions, mouth open and mouth closed. Niall MacGinnis is at his stoic worst. Mel Ferrer keeps a straight face and does express some of the sadness of the king's position. The women (Ava Gardner as Guenevere, Anne Crawford as Morgan) get to emote, Crawford especially playing off Stanley Baker as a sinister plotter.
The use of heraldry is very effective. The designs are mostly of period style, and allow the viewer to tell who is who. The armor shows some very good work, marred only occasionally by non-period details. The swordfights, though falliing into the typical Hollywood style of holding the shield behind, taking big wind-up swings, and stabbing the armpit, is done with verve and energy.
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