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The Knights Templar Revealed Hardcover – 2006

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 233 pages
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble; 2nd edition (2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760781788
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760781784
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 1.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #845,490 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By sebastian barran on January 26, 2009
not the best written book. too much,and i am paraphrasing, "we will get to that later" some good info concerning the relationship of the cistercians with the templars
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 4, 2010
I struggled through this speculative, undocumented book. If you want to learn about the Knights Tempar, there are a number of excellent books to order, such as anything by Barber, Nicholson, or Ralls, that will not insult your intelligence or remind you of an "In Search Of" episode. Avoid.
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This work by Butler and Dafoe appears to be the quintessential historical witness of the culmination of centuries of thought that lead to the creation of the “Cistercians on Horseback,” Knights Templar (KT). Being very familiar with the many places described in France and particularly in Burgundy, Fontaine, and Champagne and their respective connection to Bornholm, I very much understand where the authors are going with the story. The authors make the interesting and illuminating connections between Minoan, Philistine, Essene and Cistercians which end with the KT and the Freemasons. Additionally, I have visited many of the abbeys mentioned especially Cluny, Fontenay and Citeaux. Also discussed are Crete and Qumran which are in my plans to visit this fall.
Although most of this book only references other books (46 to be exact), it’s very easy, very well organized text, written in a chronological format and provides the information on the Crusader Period. The book goes into much detail regarding the latter. The authors paint St. Bernard as a mystic not on the same path as the Catholic Church at that time. In fact this book portrays him more of an Arian in theological thought than a follower of Athanasius. I would appreciate a good reference on this fact.
It takes more than half the book to get to the Knights Templar but it is worth the ride of the insight the reader obtains to a proto-history of these groups. There is much discussion regarding the “Salt-line Families, Culdean Christianity, the Gothic movement, Troyes fraternity, and The Prieure de Sion in the entire text. The authors dispel the claims the KT were allied with the Cathars while others claim KT were “Closet Sufi’s.” From the authors research KT served the same political and religious intentions as the Cistercians. The book goes on to compare the daily lifestyles of the KT and Cistercians which I have not viewed prior illustrating similarities. Where this information comes from is puzzling.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By F. Maddalena on June 23, 2014
This book insults anyone's intelligence who reads it.

Just to mention 2 of the major problems in the book:

- Mentioning the FICTIONAL Priory of Sion as "fact". This might be acceptable in fiction such as the Da Vinci Code... but any historian will tell you that the Priory of Sion did not exist nor there is any evidence of it.

((Note: There is a CONTEMPORARY "Priory of Sion", founded in 1956, not even 60 years ago, but it has no connection what so ever with the historical Templars… one might then say that Disney and the Boy Scouts are associated with the Templars… wait let’s not give the author bad ideas…))

- The fallacious account on how the Templas were dismantled.
The book seems to imply the Pope acted some sort of "revenge" on the Templars, while it is HISTORICALLY PROVEN (see historical documents such as the Chinon Parchment) that the Pope at the time, Clement V, absolved the Templars of all charges of heresy (even those who confessed!) in 1308 BEFORE formally disbanding the Order in 1312 and tried to protect the Templars (and try to merge them with the still existing Hospitalier Order).

The book contains more historical speculations than facts... and these disjointed speculations are merged into one implausible and unhistorical huge "conspiracy theory".

Any serious historian (or even diligent amateur) will tell you that this book belongs in the "bad historical fiction" section, not in the historical books section.
This book feels like a F-grade paper composed by a lazy student who bypassed Wikipedia entirely to get his facts from shady conspiracy theory websites.

REGARDING THE AUTHOR:

Alan Butler is an engineer, not an historian, and it shows.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Felicity Hoad on October 24, 2013
This should be retitled the 'Knights Templar - still a mystery!' No depth of research displayed - very few names named, no quotes from old texts, no photos full stop. Full of 'unable to prove' theories that Minoan beliefs from 2000BC are still active in medieval Europe, without ANY documents whatsoever. Maybe they're all stuffed away in the Vatican library under a dark conspiracy cloud, eh?

And the proof reading is abysmal. Full of spelling mistakes. Arghhhh.
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