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Knocked Out Loaded Original recording reissued


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Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, September 2, 1986
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Another Self Portrait (1969-1971): The Bootleg Series Vol. 10

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BOB DYLAN Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Bob Dylan's influence on popular music is incalculable. As a songwriter, he pioneered several different schools of pop songwriting, from confessional singer/songwriter to winding, hallucinatory, stream-of-consciousness narratives. As a vocalist, he broke down the notion that a singer must have a conventionally good voice in order to ... Read more in Amazon's Bob Dylan Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Knocked Out Loaded + Down In The Groove + Empire Burlesque
Price for all three: $22.65

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 2, 1986)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: SBME SPECIAL MKTS.
  • ASIN: B0012GN2JC
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,390 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. You Wanna Ramble
2. They Killed Him
3. Driftin' Too Far from Shore
4. Precious Memories
5. Maybe Someday
6. Brownsville Girl
7. I've Got My Mind Made Up
8. Under Your Spell

Editorial Reviews

Customer Reviews

His best of the 80s and ranks among his great albums.
MJH
While Empire Burlesque wasn't a failure in my mind, it was not a success commercially - which is what it seemed like what it was aiming for.
Scot P. Livingston
Nothing else on the album really stands out, and it sounds like Dylan's just putting product out there.
Grigory's Girl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Bushman VINE VOICE on September 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This record came out in the middle of my (approximately) five year "Dylan Absorption Phase" when I was a high school / college student. So I listened to this a lot even if it was pretty lame overall.

The meager highlights here include his lyrical collaboration with Sam Shepard, Brownsville Girl. A very long stream of consciousness reminiscence, the music behind the words is just okay but the lyrics make it pretty magical. This is a good one to listen to through headphones in the dark. Pretty funny that Brownsville Girl was included on Greatest Hits III because I can assure you, in no way was this a hit single. Just a great album track.

The really disappointing thing is that this came out right around the time Dylan was touring with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers as his backing band and those were really rocking shows. TP co-wrote one song here (the pretty rockin' and overlooked "Got My Mind Made Up") and the Heartbreakers play on the record a little but to no avail, the results are fairly sterile and boring.

Interestingly, right around this time, The Heartbreakers backed Dylan on a completely forgotten soundtrack single called Band of the Hand from a forgotten action movie of the same name. Band of the Hand rocks like nobody's business and is probably my favorite Dylan song from the 80's. Why it wasn't included on this hodgepodge record is a mystery but perhaps a bigger mystery is why Dylan has never added it to one of his rarities collections like Bootleg Series 1-3.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Bill R. Moore on July 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album seems to have a very bad reputation among Dylan fans. It is far, far from being his best album, but it does have several notable songs (and one great one), and is actually quite underrated. It obviously wasn't intended to be a cohesive or even a "real" album: it plays like a scattershot, featuring songs from various different recording sessions spread out over a number of years, as well as more than a handful of covers and songs co-written with other people (there are only two songs credited to "Bob Dylan.") The sessions for this album were originally intended to have Dylan recording a set of cover songs. Whatever the original intent, though, Dylan - with this mish-mash setlist and scattershot tracking, not to mention its short running time - clearly just wanted, for whatever reason, to release an album at this time. (Dylan's lack of interest in the project is evident from a story regarding the cover: it's actually the movie poster for some cheap foreign film; some insignificant character - a session player's girlfriend, or the like - just happened to bring it into the studio one day. Dylan, liking it, opted to use it for the cover of the album. When asked about securing the rights for its use, he replied, "Just let 'em sue us.") Such lack of effort in compiling the album may have led to its bad reputation - not to mention its handful of less-than-stellar tracks. One often reads in reviews that this album is Brownsville Girl and 7 tracks of banality. In actual fact, the only track you should skip is the absolutely unstandable They Killed Him.Read more ›
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M. L. Wheeler on March 15, 2006
Format: Audio CD
After reading reviews that this album and Down In the Groove are Dylan's worst albums, and still determined to collect all his albums, I find that this album is pretty enjoyable and a couple songs are my favorites. In my opinion, Dylan's worst albums are quality-wise at least as good as most other artists' best. There is just something about them. Also, they reflect the time and mood when they were made.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 2, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Critics be damned; they never know what they're talking about anyway. Many of them have written about this record in a tone that presumes we all agree it's at or near the nadir of Dylan's output. But I don't agree, and neither do many of my fellow listeners. This is a soulful album, from the opening bass slide of "You Wanna Ramble" to the trailing chorus at the conclusion of "Under Your Spell." The songs (and the odd but intriguing cover as well) conjure desert landscapes and long, wearying journeys of the body and mind. The resolutions of the stories within are usually ambiguous, open-ended or simply unattainable. With much of Dylan's work, it's the spaces between people that help define how they communicate, because they must do so in relation to where they stand; point-of-view is paramount. This record is a good example of how Dylan's best stories feature players who must struggle across barren landscapes to understand themselves and each other. Bob might have changed some of the lyrics to the opening song, I don't know, but I find it interesting that the track includes the line, "What happens tomorrow/ Is on your head, not mine," a bit of foreshadowing since the line is spoken by Burl Ives in the 1960 Western 'The Big Country,' starring Gregory Peck. The band really kicks on this one, and the sound is very similar to what Bob and his band have been achieving on stage in recent years. "They Killed Him" was written by Kris Kristofferson, and I think it's a good song. People object to the use of a children's choir on this track, but it sounds right to me. The way it comes off it sort of reminds me of Tom T. Hall's "100 Children." The message of both songs is simple and direct; and who's going to argue with the sentiments expressed?Read more ›
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