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Knowledge Management Lessons Learned: What Works and What Doesn't (Asis Monograph Series) Hardcover – March, 2004

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Product Details

  • Series: Asis Monograph Series
  • Hardcover: 550 pages
  • Publisher: Information Today Inc (March 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573871818
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573871815
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,003,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Mohamed Taher on October 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Based on experiences gained in the field, many chapters document the lessons succinctly. One outstanding example in this frame of reference is the Chapter three `Knowledge Management in Action: Nine Lessons Learned,' by Tom Short, IBM, and Richard C. Azzarello, Reality Consulting, Inc. (pp. 31 - 53). It is worth cataloging the nine lessons here, as an exercise in information visualization of What Works And What Doesn't:

(1) A focal point for KM improvement ensures development of an appropriate KM solution;
(2) A KM solution blueprint provides a long-lasting reference point for action;
(3) Successfully addressing a KM issue in one area of a firm often addresses it in many other areas;
(4) The best KM solutions address a business issue already perceived to be important;
(5) A passionate, committed line business leader is key to successful KM initiatives;
(6) Dedicated competent, and respected business unit members make excellent KM team members;
(7) Involve information technology and human resources from the start to expedite KM implementation;
(8) Walk a mile in their shoes;
(9) Improve knowledge worker productivity by reducing time spent on administrative or non-value-adding tasks.

Obviously, a real hard learned lesson is missing. This is true because research in KM competencies reveals: "Few knowledge practitioners hold credentials to assure excellence."(1) In this context, one would add a tenth lesson, viz., constantly improve social capital involved in KM. This improvement is unavoidable, because of two interdependent reasons: viz.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on June 4, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Examinations of critical success factors in product management, analysis of common pitfalls in knowledge management endeavors, and practical applications of knowledge management concepts are packed into Michael Koenig and T. Kanti Srikantaiah's Knowledge Management Lessons Learned: What Works And What Doesn't, a business reference which is a recommended pick for college-level students. The focus on what works and what doesn't, paired with the nuts-and-bolts experiences and demonstrations of researchers and businesspeople, makes for an important contribution in the field.
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