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262 of 312 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A balanced historical and personal memoir (I ACTUALLY READ THE BOOK)
My intentions going into this book were to simply read what Rumsfeld believes, what he remembers. With a critical eye, however, I also planned on looking for any inconsistencies, any contradictions, during his storied political years of experience. What I found led me to the title of the review; Rumsfeld's memoirs are from naturally from his perspective, but provide...
Published on February 9, 2011 by Jason

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Moderately interesting as an insight into Rumsfeld's thinking
Rumsfeld was a pivotal Washington insider in four presidential administrations (Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and Bush2) and his memoir would be expected to be a fascinating look behind the scenes at historical events. Unfortunately, that behind-the-scenes view is spotty and heavily overlain with Rumsfeld's constant editorializing and justifications, especially in the later years...
Published on February 28, 2012 by David Johnson


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262 of 312 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A balanced historical and personal memoir (I ACTUALLY READ THE BOOK), February 9, 2011
This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
My intentions going into this book were to simply read what Rumsfeld believes, what he remembers. With a critical eye, however, I also planned on looking for any inconsistencies, any contradictions, during his storied political years of experience. What I found led me to the title of the review; Rumsfeld's memoirs are from naturally from his perspective, but provide little to truly argue with other than anecdotal information, which can be very difficult to prove or disprove. Naturally, all can't be covered in the confines of this review (which is gigantic to begin with), but I found two primary recurring themes while reading these memoirs (which are, incidentally, very interesting), and one topic of discussion that is sure to draw the most ire:

1) Bipartisanship - In terms of thought as well as allegiance, Rumsfeld was not always unary.

2) National Defense - Throughout an illustrious career, he has held many positions that all eventually deal with national defense. His thoughts and actions are truly eye-opening.

3) The Bush Years - There will be the most disagreement with this portion of his recollections, but his recounting of events is infallible unless one allows political dogma to overrule reason.

BIPARTISANSHIP

What struck me most of all while reading Rumsfeld's memoirs were his extensive private and public sector experiences, and how evenly he managed to deal with nearly all he encountered. Obviously a lifelong Republican, his admiration for Reagan and Nixon are apparent during their respective historical chapters/sections, his praise was measured and fair. While he appreciated Gerald Ford's steadfastness, he also noted the naïvety shown by Ford and JFK while younger. He rips LBJ for Vietnam failures and Agnew for being Agnew, but has had diverse friendships and alliances with ardent leftists like Al Lowenstein; his references to Joseph Lieberman are always favorable. Noting specific instances that are difficult to debate, he points out the failings of a Democrat-led Congress and Senate that dominated the 1960s, eviscerates Clinton for numerous strategic mistakes, accurately depicts Gore's wooden nature, and paints an unfavorable view of Carter - Rumsfeld felt Carter was "sleepwalking" through his responsibilities - rightfully so considering the laughable responses to Soviet build-up and invasion of Afghanistan. Praising Reagan, the Great Communicator, as an obvious step up from Carter was easy, but praise and criticism is not so short-sighted or blindly allegiant to his Republican political label that he wouldn't ignore the rationale behind previous administrations' decisions. Unlike Democrats like Carl Levin, whose blind partisanship caused Rumsfeld to use the phrase "curiously immune to reason," Rumsfeld challenged respected members of George W. Bush's cabinet (Condoleeza Rice and Colin Powell). Rumsfeld's autobiographical perspective is poignant, personal, and candid. An equal mix of humor and humility.

NATIONAL DEFENSE

Exhibiting a proclivity for proactivity, his views on national defense were more balanced than many believe. Perhaps it was his upbringing after Pearl Harbor that molded him in this regard - at that time support for war was nearly unanimous, but personal sacrifices were equally understood - but he contributed to numerous decisions showing measured aggression - opposition to the bombing pause in Vietnam, later post-9/11 actions, caution when working on the SALT II resolutions with the Soviets - he also appears somewhat indifferent towards the Yom Kippur war and even wrote his senior thesis regarding the need to limit presidential power during wartime. Mr. Rumsfeld was not always on the offensive as some would believe; he was against one of the most aggressive shows of military and scientific strength in our country's history: the NASA moon landing.

THE BUSH YEARS & 9/11

Rumsfeld remarked that Middle East stability was important for America's future as far back as 1983, and commented on terrorism reaching our shores numerous times during his long time swimming among the sharks of bureaucracy (he mentioned concerns about al-Qaida to the CIA in the late 1990s); so, it is ironic that many wish to tarnish his legacy by assuming nothing good was done during the Bush years - pre and post 9/11. As he famously revealed, and how he titled this book, there are simply unknown unknowns in this world. Despite being part of bureaucracy for much of his adult life, he still remained distanced enough to recognize the intrinsic mess. He remembers GWB as a formidable president, different than the popular image fostered by critics and satirists, and utterly rejects the Cheney as puppet-master meme.

Not so one-sided that he didn't have a few negative, albeit hesitant, aforementioned comments about Rice and Powell, noting the former's senior-level government inexperience and the latter's reserved nature as hurdles for the Bush administration, Rumsfeld nonetheless spoke highly of their efforts during what was possibly the most difficult and unknown time in American political and military history. Open shots are not frequent in the memoirs, but he does note Rice's tendency to placate multiple diverging departments - a habit undoubtedly formed in academia - thereby giving the impression that Bush left a matter unresolved, as one of the aspects that hindered progress in the war on terror, a phrase with which he disagrees. Additionally, he discounts erroneous claims from those who would have others preposterously believe Bush and the United States were unilaterally acting in response to 9/11. Rumsfeld accurately states that is impossible to stop all terrorism, that a nation can only defend against its possibilities and react fiercely when affected, but he also feels MISTAKES WERE MADE. The man is not without fault or humility. Providing retrospective thoughts on how President Bush might have handled the post-9/11 war on terror, while uniformly disagreeing with the notion that actions were too grandiose or equivalent to war crimes, Rumsfeld notes that influence from Saudi Arabia should have been a deliverable rather than an insinuation based upon support, alternate sources of energy should have been researched, and more could have been done to get America, particularly young people, involved in support of the military or intelligence communities. There are minor policy disagreements (i.e. 20/20 hindsight), but to borrow a phrase, his reflection is fair and balanced.

CONCLUSION

Through his numerous election failures, both as the official running and as a supporter, Rumsfeld realizes that in politics the right doesn't always get done. Moreover, what is right is nearly never agreed upon. What are without doubt, however, are Rumsfeld's intelligence, patriotism, determination, efforts, and resolve. His talents have led him to numerous accomplishments which reflect the kind of tireless civil servant he has been throughout his decades long service to our nation. The unfortunate side-effect to any endeavor as monumental as a retelling of career as long as Rumsfeld's is A) Length, and B) Irrelevant personal life additions. The former made this book a chore, the latter is understandable considering context; the combination is the reason for the 4-star, rather than 5-star, review. To the detractors of his efforts, specifically those who have not read the book, I offer an appropriate Rumsfeld quote: "Events can often seem to have been obvious in retrospect."
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135 of 163 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Although SUBJECTIVE, This Is the Best INSIDER's Look We Are Going to See of Our Country for Years to Come!!!!! - 5 STARS, February 8, 2011
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This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
His career ended in controversy equivalent to what Robert McNamara absorbed when his tenure came to an end as Defense Secretary during the Viet Nam War. Both men probably feel considerable remorse at actions not taken, and paths not followed. That is the nature of war. General Eisenhower during the Normandy invasion was quoted as saying the most important thing in war is planning, and then after the first contact with the enemy, you are basically improvising.

I think like most Americans, I have my own issues with Rumsfeld, and still have quite a few of them. This book goes a long way towards clarifying the reader's understanding of government, the role of government, and the participants in that government. After 726 pages of narrative I found no great surprises, but if your goal is to fill in your understanding of this period in American history from the 1960's through the present, than we both have come to the right place. Rumsfeld possesses a finely tuned mind, and the unflinching ability to make a decision right or wrong, and then EXECUTE BRILLIANTLY. One of the issues for this man is to what extent he executed BAD decisions BRILLIANTLY.

No one who reads this autobiography will question the man's patriotism, or desire to see America continue to dominate the world scene as the world's sole remaining superpower. We will all question his judgments, and how he executed those decisions when he was the point man making the decisions. This book covers Donald Rumsfeld's entire life, and it is an extraordinary life, and very much worth studying. The book itself is divided into 50 chapters which are subdivided into 14 parts which are:

Part I Lessons in Terror

Part II An American, Chicago Born

Part III The US Congress: From Camelot to Quagmire

Part IV In Nixon's Arena

Part V Javelin Catcher: Inside the Ford White House

Part VI Fighting the Cold War

Part VII Back to Reality

Part VIII Leaning Forward

Part IX Into the Graveyard of Empires

Part X Saddam's Miscalculation

Part XI The Occupation of Iraq

Part XII Wartime Detention

Part XIII Pulling On Our Boots: Challenges and Controversies Beyond the War Zones

Part XIV The Long, Hard Slog

As you can see, the author does not get to the Iraq war until Parts IX and X. Part IX is about the war in Afghanistan which follows 9/11, and Part X begins his discussion of Iraq. This means that Rumsfeld takes us through 350 pages of preliminary biography before getting to what most readers will be interested in. I found that it would be a terrible mistake to forgo reading the first eight parts of this book. The story of this ambitious and gifted American is truly extraordinary, and serves to set up the last parts of the book. You will learn how Rumsfeld thinks, and why President's Nixon and Ford were so attracted to his talented intellect. The anecdotes are all here, and I found myself thinking back on his life many times while exploring the issues of Afghanistan and Iraq which will plaque him in the sunset of his life.

He was the youngest Secretary of Defense in American history. The office had been created in the late 1940's after the United States decided to rename the War Department and give it the name The Defense Department. Rumsfeld pulls no punches in this book, and the reader will appreciate this part of his personality. If someone screws up, he tells you. In October of 1983, at the Beirut airport in Lebanon 241 American servicemen were killed by a terrorist bomb. This was the largest loss of life for the Marines since the attack on Iwo Jima during World War II. Former Vice President Bush called the terrorists who perpetrated the attack "cowards". Rumsfeld notes that they were terrorists but they weren't cowards. He also notes that President Reagan made a strategic mistake by not retaliating firmly in a military manner subsequent to the attacks. This book is full of hundreds of stories like this, and they are insightful.

Many readers will want to confirm the opinions they already hold of the Defense Secretary. My purpose in reading the book is to get a better feel for history and how it is shaped by the individuals charged with the responsibility for making it. From this standpoint, the book is very much a success. I do not look for an objective analysis of the Rumsfeld years. We are never going to see that from the participant himself, and it will take decades of scholarly studies with research and cross checks to only just perhaps ferret out the truth. Now given that when a man like Rumsfeld shows you how he thinks, how he develops what he calls "options" papers, this is worth its weight in gold. He points out that many of the problems he faced were intractable, and what you look to do is find the "least bad decision". This was true in Lebanon and it proved to be true in both Afghanistan and Iraq.

He turns his experienced eyes to Viet Nam and tells how during the evacuation and it was a desperate evacuation; it was announced at one point that all Americans had been evacuated from the American embassy in Saigon. You will remember seeing the pictures of Americans being spirited from the embassy's rooftop by American helicopters. It turned out that the announcement was premature. Rumsfeld wanted to announce that there were still Marines in the embassy. Then Secretary of State Henry Kissinger fought him, but Nixon ultimately sided with Rumsfeld, and the announcement was made. Rumsfeld thinking was clear. There were so many lies stated by the government during the Viet Nam war that he did not want the war ended on a lie. This demonstrates INTEGRITY, and whatever history will say about the Defense Secretary, no one will question his integrity.

Afghanistan and Iraq:

As readers we may not like what we read, but it's all here, laid out with a ribbon tied around it. The issues that are thoroughly discussed which I found fascinating were the following:

* Why did Bin Laden get away in Tora Bora when we had him in a vice like grip?

* Why did we suffer a corrupt individual like Karzai to run the Afghan government after our victory?

* Why did we not immediately begin the training of an Afghan army to replace the American presence on the ground and act as a counter force to the Taliban? There are after all 29,000,000 Afghans, more than enough to recruit a force?

* Forget about the CIA, how did the military intelligence agencies get it all wrong concerning Saddam and weapons of mass destruction?

* How did Rumsfeld and his associates come to the conclusion that a force of 100,000 plus Americans could control a post Saddam Iraq?

* Rumsfeld is a student of history. He knew that in the closing days of World War II the United States planned to use Nazi remnants to operate the German state because they were the only ones who knew how to keep the electricity going, the water drinkable, and the railroads running? Why the United States DISBAND the Iraqi army which then fostered the equivalent of civil war and made our job extraordinarily more difficult?

* Why did Rumsfeld allow HIMSELF to become the focus of attention with numerous press conferences, where he usurped the role of the generals, and frankly belittled them? Like his predecessor Robert McNamara, Rumsfeld seemed to become the problem itself, and thus ultimately he was removed from power.

CONCLUSION:

All biographies are subjective and self-serving. By their very nature, biography is a selective memory process. Some unfavorable events and decisions can be conveniently left out, while others can be distorted. After finishing the book, I thought I had learned a great deal about how our government makes major decisions. I understood the processes involved in decision making at a very high level, and for this I am grateful. This is not the book of a disgruntled journalist trying to drum up book sales.

This is the story of a very distinguished American who devoted a considerable number of years of his life to public service. What he has to say is valuable both for us as free citizens of a Republic and for history to judge. I personally loved it, and wished others, such as Robert McNamara, and the first George Bush would have been more candid with the American people and published their memoirs. All in all I think you will love this book, and thank you for reading this review.

Richard C. Stoyeck
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoy the facts, January 16, 2012
After reading George W. Bush's Decision Points and Dick Cheney's In My Time, I decided to read Rumsfeld's memoirs Known and Unknown which, like the other two works, is simply outstanding. It's hard to believe that I would say this, because during Bush's tenure, I was not a fan of any of the three. But Rumsfeld has had an amazing life and career, and this book, like Cheney's memoirs, will take the reader through nearly four decades of very interesting, highly eventful American history. Rumsfeld is on a short list of Americans who has had this kind of rare, front-row seat to the world events he experienced. These memoirs are a clear, factual presentation of Rumsfeld's career. Read and enjoy them as a fair addendum to everything else that's been said about him.
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62 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good primary source, February 10, 2011
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This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
In 1968, a congressman from Illinois, only 36 years old, interviewed a 27-year-old for the position of intern. Even though the applicant did not impress the congressman and failed to get the job, a friendship started between the two men that would prove to influence the history of the United States and the world. The congressman was Donald Henry Rumsfeld. The intern applicant was Richard Bruce Cheney, or Dick Cheney, America's 46 vice president under George W. Bush.

The anecdote is one of many in Rumsfeld's 800-page memoir, Known and Unknown.

The book interestingly opens with Rumsfeld telling the story behind one of the most played footages on TV before, during and after America's Operation Iraqi Freedom: A younger Rumsfeld shaking the hand of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein in Baghdad.

Rumsfeld, who served as chief of staff for President Gerald Ford and secretary of defense under Bush II, was also President Ronald Reagan's special envoy to the Middle East. The former envoy puts his 1983 visit to Baghdad--and meeting with Saddam--in context. He writes: "Iraq's Ba'athist regime was at the time the bitter adversary of two nations that threatened the interests of the United States--Syria and Iran." He argues: "Syria, under President Hafez Al-Assad, was a leading supporter of international terrorism and occupied portions of Lebanon, a country that when left to its own devices favored the West." Iran, according to Rumsfeld, "had been a close friend of the United States until the 1979 coup by militant Islamists led by a radical cleric, Ayatollah Khomeini."

From the perspective of Reagan's America in 1983, as spelled out by Rumsfeld, "Iraq sat between these two menaces--Syria and Iran. It must have taken a good deal of effort, or more likely some mistakes, for America to be on the bad side of all three countries." Therefore, in 1983, "there was a clear logic in trying to cultivate warmer relations with Saddam Hussein's Iraq."

As such, Rumsfeld flew to Baghdad where he met Saddam, and found him to be "reasonable." He concluded: "I did not expect that Saddam's regime would play such a prominent role in our country's future--and in my life--in the years ahead."

Even though the book covers Rumsfeld's long career in politics, starting with his running for Congress in 1962, his invitation to the White House where he met President John Kennedy thereafter, his relations with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and his role in the Ford administration, among other domestic issues, the greater part of the book focuses on the Middle East.

In the first chapter, Rumsfeld explains America's thinking after 241 marines were killed in Beirut in 1983. The former defense minister takes aim at the Syrian regime, which he describes as one that "possessed in the extreme two qualities particularly dangerous in a military adversary--ruthlessness and patience." He added: "Like all dictators, the [Syrian] regime had the advantage of not needing to cater to its domestic opinion. It could do whatever it deemed expedient to achieve its goals."

Rumsfeld concluded that Damascus has been "playing a diplomatic game" with the United States for decades. He accused Syria and Hezbollah of assassinating former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri in 2005, and argued that the international isolation that the US imposed on Syria--after the assassination--was paying off since the Syrians were willing to offer genuine concessions as they pulled out their troops from Lebanon. "In Bush's second term, however, there was a change of course and the administration reengaged with Syria. The Department of State proposed relieving Syria's diplomatic isolation and reverting to the practice of sending high-level US officials to Damascus for meetings."

In Rumsfeld's opinion, the American policy of engagement, combined "with our worsening difficulties in Iraq that were at least partly the result of Syria's actions, sent a signal of weakness to Assad that he was quick to exploit." Rumsfeld added: "He reverted to his earlier policies of greater hostility toward America and our interests. Yet even in 2007, the State Department invited Syria back to the negotiating table in pursuit of Middle East peace between Israel and the Palestinians."

He concluded: "Seeing that the United States was again the supplicant, and with the ill feelings about their assassination of a democratic Lebanese leader seemingly having been forgotten, if not forgiven, the Syrians reverted to their tried-and-true ways: obfuscation and delay at the negotiating table and active support for terrorism and covert pursuit of illegal weapons programs."

According to Rumsfeld, after the Abu-Ghraib prison scandal in Iraq, he submitted his resignation twice to President Bush, who turned it down. The former official also goes into detail to showcase how the decision to go to war in Iraq was taken. Since it is his memoirs, he tends to square the blame on other Bush officials, which is fair.

Whether you agree with Rumsfeld's version of events or not, his book is certainly a primary source from one of the most remarkable people in the Washington decision-making circles. The style of the actual writers, Eric Martin and Stephen Elliot, is entertaining and smooth. For the political junkies and the curious, Known and Unknown is an interesting read.
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184 of 232 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent work of history, February 8, 2011
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This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
I have just finished reading this book and it is far more engrossing than I expected. From the Kennedy years to the Nixon era and the Ford years, the first part of the book was a welcome revisiting of history. I found the second half on the Bush administration truly interesting and entertaining. Well dome. Recommend highly.
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93 of 116 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tell it like you saw it, February 8, 2011
This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
The book really does go behind the scenes and provides the reader with an understanding of all the isses, people, and personalities that came together during a difficult period in American history. You can like or dislike Rumsfeld all you want but he did the job he was asked to do and I believe he did it honorably. Sure, the book comes off like he is defending the decisions he made. That is exactly what I was expecting from the book and I learned a lot from his insights. I'm glad to see him back in the spotlight, even if it is only to promote his book. Whether you like Rumsfeld or not, you should read this book.
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51 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spoiler alert: this book is GREAT., February 8, 2011
This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
"Rumsfeld's book? Yeah, right," I said to myself picking this 815 page monster up from the shelf. I quickly thumbed through the pages, expecting to find a tome filled to the brim with the trappings of a classic political memoir. I was met with something delightfully atypical.

First to catch my eye were the three spectacular photo inserts. Offering an illustrative timeline of Donald Rusmfeld's expansive life and career, these pictures depict his childhood, time in congress, work in private business, and service in four administrations in magnificent detail.

I was intrigued. I decided to chance the purchase and am glad I did. Never really interested in politics, I would expect a book like this to be a real bore, but as a lover of history I have been thoroughly enjoying the contents on Known and Unknown. A well-written, detailed, personal account of one third of our nation's history awaits and I would encourage anyone and everyone to read it.
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54 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Known and Unknown, February 9, 2011
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This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
A super biography of Don Rumsfeld who is donating all proceeds he receives to charaties that support our wounded & other troops. It is an interesting history that candidly reports his role in government from the 1960s till today. It is a great read, but a long one at over 800 pages.

Now that his biography is out, it is very interesting to compare his take on serving as Sect.of Defense during Bush 2's administration to all of the flack that he got from the MSM and left wing press.

He comes across as a man that is a straight shooter & says that his biggest regret was not resigning earlier. He mentions turning in his resignation 2x but was refused until later.

Good read with tons of footnotes and simply excellent documentation.
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33 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful, no-nonsense memoir that will assist historians down the road, February 10, 2011
This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
Any critic of Secretary Rumsfeld (I fall into this category) concerned with dispassionate, fair, and accurate judgments of historical events ought to read this book even more so than his supporters. To be sure, approaching this book with a healthy dose of skepticism is a good thing. However, if one reads this memoir through an objective lens unpolluted by human bias and emotion, and factors Rumsfeld's perspective into the equation, at the very least it will challenge the conventional wisdom of the post-9/11 era. And while the contents do not absolve Rumsfeld of every wrongdoing, if one is honest with oneself it will at the very least up-end numerous preconceived notions about the former secretary.

Bottom Line: A no-nonsense work of history. Minimal score-settling and revisionism. Sorry, no mea culpas either. Simply a deeply thoughtful and well-researched memoir out of the Kissinger/Acheson tradition from one of the titans of our time. One of the better memoirs of a statesmen I've read in quite some time.
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37 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Serious, Intelligent, and Remarkable Autobiography, February 8, 2011
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This review is from: Known and Unknown: A Memoir (Hardcover)
A must read for anyone wishing to get first hand facts and insight into many of our nation's greatest foreign policy and war decisions over the last 40 years. You may summarily dismiss some of the hater posts because it is quite obvious they didn't read the book, and probably don't read much of anything anyway. That said, this book, and the Rumsfeld Papers website, [...], are treasure troves of fascinating historical detail - supplied and authored by a truly remarkable public servant.
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Known and Unknown: A Memoir
Known and Unknown: A Memoir by Donald Rumsfeld (Hardcover - February 8, 2011)
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