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Knox's Irregulars Paperback – November 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466487046
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466487048
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (113 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,452,144 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

J. Wesley Bush currently lives and works in Nairobi, Kenya. He has previously served as an airborne infantryman, military intelligence cryptolinguist, NGO worker, and historian. He also spent two years as a unicyclist in a circus. John is the husband of one lovely wife and the proud father of four boys (with another on the way.) He can be found online at www.jwesleybush.com.

Customer Reviews

The book is well written and the characters are well developed.
Ricardo Portella
There were heavy religious elements to the book, that were unnecessary and frankly annoying if you aren't a christian fundamentalist.
stryke
Highly recommended to fans of both military and thoughtful science fiction.
D. Singleton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Wisdom on October 21, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Take a Tom Clancy novel like The Teeth Of The Tiger (Jack Ryan), set it in a universe like the one depicted in Firefly - The Complete Series, sprinkle in a respect for the sensibilities of the Protestant Reformation, and you've got J. Wesley Bush's new novel "Knox's Irregulars".

I first got to know Mr. Bush's writing through his old blog "Le Sabot Post Moderne" way back in the "mid-naughties". His blog was so effective in its defense of a vigorous Christianity and an unashamed western civilization, that it was actually hacked at least once by islamist radicals.

A similar cultural clash on a planet at the edge of known space in the 25th century is the subject of his new book, "Knox's Irregulars". The book opens with the Terran Hegemony granting sovereignty to a planet colonized by two very different peoples. The New Genevans are a small group of Calvinistic space pilgrims inspired to Christian faith by the Second Great Reformation of the 23rd century. They have found a way to live freely and prosperously on a small, rocky peninsula on a backwater planet, living their lives as they believe God would have them do. Their jealous neighbors to the north, the Abkhenazi, are a Neo-Islamist people who believe that they can forcefully advance the evolution of humans into beings of pure energy by inhumane scientific experimentation and collectivist living. Since these two outlooks mix like oil and water, one does not turn too many pages in this book before the struggle comes to a clash of arms.

Mr.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By W. Rogers on November 11, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Last night, I stayed up way past the normal time I turn in, reading a new Christian novel e-book that I found out about on Twitter, called Knox's Irregulars by J. Wesley Bush. I was immediately intrigued, because it was Christian science fiction. It is rare that I read modern Christian novels, and even rarer that I enjoy them. I am a lover of classical literature, and most modern novels, particularly Christian novels, don't really stand up well next to the classics. However, I was pleasantly surprised with Knox's Irregulars.

Knox's Irregulars is set in the 25th century, on a distant planet that humans have colonized. There are two groups of humans inhabiting the planet, the New Genevans, a small group of Reformed Christians and others living on the south end of the planet's continent. The other group is the Abkhenazi, a much larger people group, whose religion and politics could best be described as a cobbling together of New-Age spirituality, Islam, Marxism and Nazism.

The Abkhenazi group is rather poorly off, economically, because of their political/religious reasons. As we see in Islamic and Marxist nations, the people always suffer greatly due to the political and religious views of those nations. But their soldiers fight with the fanatical devotion we see from Islamic fighters and the Nazi soldiers. Further, they attempt to engineer evolution in humans through experiments on their prisoners and subjects, something we've seen from Nazism.

The New Genevans, on the other hand, are a mostly Christian group, primarily Reformed Christian(read: Calvinist), although there are those who don't adhere to Christianity in their midst. They tend to be more prosperous than their Abkhenazi, promoting jealousy from their neighbors.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Magruder on November 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a great piece of work, excellent character development without filling pages and pages with unnecessary depth. I always enjoy an author who is not so attached to his characters that they are untouchable or seemingly immortal. The theological work in was unexpected, unique, and fit well within the story line. Look forward to future work by Bush.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By R B Elmore on November 9, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a very good read. The characters are well developed and the action makes sense unlike many novels of this type I've read. The unabashed and fearless defense of conservative Christian values is most refreshing to this reader. He doesn't shrink from taking the dangers of radical islam to their logical ends.

If, like me, you're sick and tired of books that portray conservatives as mouth breathing, hate filled Neanderthals and want to read something that shows Conservative values in the positive light they deserve this book is for you. I certainly hope this isn't his last effort.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mark Andrew Edwards on November 25, 2011
Format: Paperback
I'm a long (LONG) time Baen Books reader and I damn near cut my teeth on David Drake's Hammer's Slammers series, so I've been reading military science fiction since the `good old days'. Knox's Irregulars is a worth addition to the genre, not just because of the solid military action but because of the worldbuilding and the unique take on theology in war.

The plot is pretty straightforward, good guys verses bad guys. And that's ok. The bad guys in this book are semi-Islamic extremists who slaughter the moderates in their own government and promptly invade their infidel neighbors. The `infidel neighbors' are a smallish colony of Calvinist Christian colonists who purchased some land from the original settlers and had the audacity to build a successful, technological society. The good guys are outnumbered, pushed aside and war in all its ugliness ensues. The protagonist, Randal Knox, is son of the Prime Minister, groomed to succeed him but he rejected that life to enlist and rise to the heady rank of Corporal in the infantry. When the invasion hits, he's trapped deep behind the front lines and ends up organizing a partisan force to harass the bad guys and ultimately play a pivotal role in ending the war. It's Red Dawn meets Starship Troopers.

The book is polished and professional. It really would fit in magnificently in the Baen roster, and who knows, maybe it will some day. The military details are authentic, which makes sense since Mr. Bush was Airborne Infantry. The tech is functional, the powered armor feels a bit like John Ringo's but with a little less `fantasy tech'. You get the feeling that these suits could be made and used sometime this century. There is a cost for every victory, which is something a lot of military sci-fi seems to miss.
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More About the Author

J. Wesley currently lives and works in Kyiv, Ukraine. He has previously served as an airborne infantryman, military intelligence cryptolinguist, NGO worker, and historian. He also spent two years as a unicyclist in a circus. He is the husband of one lovely wife and the proud father of five boys.

Connect on Twitter: @jwesleybush

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