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Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity Hardcover – September 4, 2007


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Frequently Bought Together

Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity + Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale + Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion (Knuffle Bunny Series)
Price for all three: $29.96

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - Kindergarten
  • Lexile Measure: 690L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Disney-Hyperion; 1st edition (September 4, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423102991
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423102991
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 0.4 x 12.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (120 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Knuffle Bunny returns, but this time he has a doppelganger. Trixie is off to school, and things are going well enough—until she notices that Sonja is holding her own Knuffle Bunny. Arrgh! The afternoon results in dueling bunnies, which are confiscated by the teacher. Happily, they are returned at the end of the day, but at 2:30 a.m. realization hits: the bunny Trixie is sleeping with is not her own. Despite parental protestations, phone calls are placed, bunnies are exchanged, and the girls, bonded during the trauma, become best friends. This has much of the charm of Knuffle Bunny (2004), a Caldecott Honor Book, but the premise is stretched here: the middle-of-the-night meeting is energetic, but it seems overplayed. As in the previous title, the slice-of-life artwork is smashing. Willem's cartoon-style art, set against crisp black-and-white photos of New York City interiors and exteriors, catches every bit of the plentiful emotion. Keen-eyed kids will have fun keeping track of the Knuffle Bunny as he's lost, then found again. Cooper, Ilene

Review

Trixie knows that she will wow all the kids at Pre-K with her "one-of-a-kind" toy, but she doesn't reckon on Sonja, who arrives with her own Knuffle Bunny-and the morning does "not go well." The two bunnies are confiscated and returned at the end of the day, but neither girl notices that they've been swapped, until the wee hours of the morning. Willems revisits his black-and-white Brooklyn, his now-signature cartoon characters superimposed on the photographs. This technique here yields some spectacular results: The middle-of-the-night hostage exchange features a glorious image of the Manhattan skyline, the teeny figures of Trixie and her daddy and Sonja and her daddy approaching from opposite sides of Grand Army Plaza. His mastery of pacing is evident in every panel and page turn, the understated text punctuating the illustrations perfectly, and his use of the conventions of cartooning add to the hilarity. Too often, sequels come off as obviously calculated attempts to cash in on success; this offering, with its technical brilliance and its total and sympathetic understanding of the psychology of the preschooler, stands as magnificent in its own right.—Kirkus

It was inevitable: since those fi8rst words triggered by her joyful reunion with Knuffle Bunny (Knuffle Bunny, BCCB 10/04), Trixie has learned to talk . . . and talk, and talk, and talk. She's eager to show her one-of-a-kind bunny to her classmates in preschool, until she sees Sonja has her own, nearly identical Knuffle Bunny. The girls argue and get their best friends taken away by the teacher, and there's a tragic mix-up upon their return at the end of the day. Unfortunately, while these girls can talk, they cant' tell time, and when they each discover the mistake in the wee hours of the morning, their beleaguered fathers have no choice but to venture out into the New York night to make the exchange. Willems manages pitch-perfect humor with his usual dexterity as he moves up and down the scales here-this story is as funny for grownups as it is for the slightly older elementary students to whom it seems best suited, and yet it remains sympathetic to listeners who are Trixie's age and have shared her predicament as well. The book mines humor from film noir conventions by casting a falsely sinister complexion over the mistaken identity and the nocturnal exchange, a tone that brings new significance to the black-and-white photographic backdrops behind the lively scrawled figures, while the epilogue brings viewers right back to bleary real life with the young and feckless. Yet another layered and effective work from Willems, this joyously continues his string of uncontested successes. KC—BCCB

This second book starring Trixie, her parents, and her best stuffed-animal friend (Knuffle Bunny, rev. 9/04) touches on situations and emotions immediately familiar to small children and their grownup caregivers. Trixie (older now, and a whole lot more verbal than when we first met her) can't wait to share her "one-of-a-kind" Knuffle Bunny with her preschool friends. But when she spots classmate Sonja with a Knuffle Bunny look-alike (Sonja calls hers "Nuffle"), "the morning [does] not go well." The girls fight, and the bunnies are confiscated for the day. When it's time to go home, their teacher reunites each girl with her toy...or so it seems. An urgent middle-of-the-night phone call ("We have your bunny") and an emergency rabbit exchange restore order and provide Trixie with her first human best friend. Willems's page design and animation-inspired panel illustrations are just as visually dynamic as in the first book. As before, colorful cartoon-style characters are set against black-and-white photographs of an urban neighborhood. While the text winks above children's heads a couple of times, most young listeners will be so engaged in the drama that they'll care as little as Trixie does about such technicalities as "what 2:30 a.m.' means." Who needs sleep at a time like this?—Horn Book

When Trixie and her beloved Knuffle Bunny go to preschool, Trixie is shocked to learn that her bunny is not entirely unique in the world. Indeed, classmate Sonja has one, too! An argument ensues over the pronunciation of the bunny's name ("Kuh-nuffle," insists Trixie. "Nuffle," replies Sonja), and the teacher confiscates both bunnies, returning them at the end of the day. Trixie's blissful reunion comes to a dramatic conclusion at 2:30 a.m. when she awakens to the horrifying fact that this " is NOT Knuffle Bunny." In an unspeakable error, the stuffed animals have been switched. And both girls expect the mistake to be corrected immediately. Fans will not be surprised that daddy and Trixie venture into the Brooklyn night to meet Sonja and her dad for the rapturous exchange and a final hug that presages friendship between the girls. As readers have come to expect of Willems, his understated text is brief and the visual storytelling is hilariously eloquent. He masterfully employs the technique of setting his vivid, hand-drawn characters against photographs of neighborhood, school, and even (in an exquisite page turn) the beautifully up-lit Grand Army Plaza at night. In both photographs and cartoons there is expansively witty detail, and it will take a keen observer to distinguish between the "twin" bunnies (and to find the famous pigeon). Irresistibly funny, tender, and universal, this is another consummate star turn for Trixie, daddy, bunny, and their creator.—SLJ

In this sympathetic sequel to Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, former toddler Trixie gains verbal dexterity and still treasures her rag doll, Knuffle Bunny. Tugging her gangly, red-haired father along the sidewalk, she hurries to her preschool's show-and-tell, eager to show off her pale-green, floppy rabbit. "But just as her daddy kissed her good-bye, Trixie saw Sonja." No words need explain Trixie's distressed expression, because a turn of the page says it all: Trixie's classmate, with a wicked smirk, is clutching a bunny of her own. "Suddenly, Trixie's one-of-a-kind Knuffle Bunny wasn't so one-of-a-kind anymore." Each girl hugs her rabbit, with Trixie insisting, "Kuh-nuffle! Kuh-nuffle!" and Sonja retorting, "Nuffle! Nuffle!" Their teacher raises an eyebrow and puts both rabbits in time-out until the end of the day. Willems expertly sets up this case of mistaken identity, as each girl accidentally brings home the wrong bunny, and a late-night exchange is needed to resolve the girls' dilemma. As in the first book, Willems creates comic-book-style panels, with grayscale photographs of Brooklyn as backgrounds for his color-illustrated characters; insiders will recognize allusions to past Willems titles too. In a satisfying resolution, Trixie and Sonja become best friends, demonstrating that two or more children can enjoy similar toys. Not a word or image feels out of place.—PW

Knuffle Bunny returns, but this time he has a doppelganger. Trixie is off to school, and things are going well enough-until she notices that Sonja is holding her own Knuffle Bunny. Arrgh! The afternoon results in dueling bunnies, which are confiscated by the teacher. Happily, they are returned at the end of the day, but at 2:30 a.m. realization hits: the bunny Trixie is sleeping with is not her own. Despite parental protestations, phone calls are placed, bunnies are exchanged, and the girls, bonded during the trauma, become best friends. This has much of the charm of Knuffle Bunny (2004), a Caldecott Honor Book, but the premise is stretched here: the middle-of-the-night meeting is energetic, but it seems overplayed. As in the previous title, the slice-of-life artwork is smashing. Willem's cartoon-style art, set against crisp black-and-white photos of New York City interiors and exteriors, catches every bit of the plentiful emotion. Keen-eyed kids will have fun keeping track of the Knuffle Bunny as he's lost, then found again.—Booklist

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Customer Reviews

Your kids will love it and you will love reading it to your kids!
thedeadlyhandsofkungfu
I'm getting her the first one for her 3rd birthday and I'm sure it will be a great addition to our home library.
Neely P
(There is one book that my great-niece insists I read over and over and over.
Judy K. Polhemus

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Mo Willems is one of my favorite kids' authors, mostly for his simply drawn yet totally on-target books such as the Pigeon series ("Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus") and those featuring the (unlikely) pair of Elephant and Piggie. Willems has an eye for subtle humor, and a pair of sentences or a squiggle here or there convey a great deal of (very funny) information.

Therefore, the Knuffle Bunny "series" (there are now two of them, the first won the Caldecott) represents a bit of a departure. Instead of uncluttered animal drawings against plain background, Willems places computer-aided characters against photos of urban surroundings. For example, on page 3, Willems superimposes wide-eyed, excited Trixie and her orangy-haired Dad on a sidewalk. The sidewalk is part of a photo that includes a very 50's looking black and white photo of the "Clever Barber Shop." The plot begins happily enough:

"Trixie was excited because she was taking her one-of-a-kind Knuffle Bunny someplace very special ... [turn the page] school!"

More black and white photos appear, enlivened by Willems' superimposed, computer-aided drawings of teachers, parents, and students. The merging of photo and drawing is both appealing and skillful. Willems's bright colors and mastery of physical expression ensure that the photos are always subordinate to his computer colored hand drawings (well, except in one magnificent two-page photo spread).

The book is also more talky than the simpler Willlems' fare. Here, Trixie and her very special Knuffle Bunny meet another girl, Sonja, who also has a Knuffle Bunny! Imagine wearing the same new clothes to a wedding and discovering someone wearing the same outfit: Trixie's mortification must feel 10 times worse!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Young Mensan BookParade on April 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Hayden S., age 7, Southeast Michigan Mensa

This is story about a little girl who owns a Knuffle bunny. She goes to school with her Knuffle bunny, but she discovers that there is another bunny at show and tell. She is sad that her bunny isn’t unique. Another girl has a Nuffle bunny. Trixie and Sonja argue about their bunnies and this leads to the teacher grabbing the bunnies from the girls and placing them on a high shelf for the rest of the day. Later, the bell rings and the teacher gives the bunnies back, but she accidently gives Knuffle bunny to Sonja and Nuffle bunny to Trixie. At first, the girls don’t realize it, but in bed they can’t sleep because they notice it’s not the right bunny. Trixie and Sonja both tell their dad to make a phone call to the other’s dad. The dad’s rush across town with their daughters and exchange the bunnies. The girls are so happy and they become best friends. The next morning the girls have lots of catching up to do with playing with their bunnies.
Others would enjoy this book too. It’s a pleasant story about friendship forming and sharing. These are things that would make everyone smile.
I found it interesting that the bunnies are not actually identical. They can easily be told apart by the color of their ears and the Knuffle bunny has a bow on its head. I think the author made them different so the reader could see that the girls were given the wrong bunny and anticipate the reaction. The most useful part of the book is that it shows that friendship is more important than toys. It also teaching that sharing is a part of friendship.
I think young children up to aged seven would enjoy this book. The lessons are useful for all children and people though.
I give this book a five star rating for the good lessons and cute bunnies.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Z Hayes HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I can't honestly say who looked forward to this sequel more - me or my 2.5 yr old daughter! We both loved Knuffle Bunny, and the poor book is dog-eared by now...its been read so many times that my little one can 'read' the words even before I say them out loud, she has it memorised, words, sounds and all!

In this follow-up, Trixie is in preschool, and thinks Knuffle Bunny will be a success at school, only to find another girl has a Knuffle Bunny too! Well, I won't give too much away [the synopsis provided by Amazon is sufficient], but this sequel retains the humor & wit of its predecessor. The wonderful blend of photographs and illustrations enhance the simple story, and it is fun to read a book that truly encapsulates what it means to be a young child. Highly recommended for the very young, and young at heart!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By DJ Joe Sixpack HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on March 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a fun, funny sequel to Mo Willem's masterpiece, "Knuffle Bunny," one of the finest children's books in recent memory. Here, Trixie (and Knuffle Bunny) are a little bit older, and going to pre-K school... Of course, taking your toys to school can have unexpected consequences, and that's especially true when Trixie runs into another little girl... with the very same rabbit!! Willems captures the 3-4 year-old mindset as well as he did for toddlers, and this book will be a favorite of families that fell in love with the first book. Recommended! (ReadThatAgain children's book reviews)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David on August 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to say just how much I love this book, and the entire Knuffle Bunny Trilogy. Especially gratifying, is that in each book, Trixie gets a little older and learns a new lesson that is appropriate for her age.

This book, like the rest of the series, is an instant classic! The style of drawings on photographs makes for a great visual experience. The story is easy enough for my 3 year olds to grasp, and yet is fun to read as an adult. Mo Willems is probably the greatest children's author since Dr. Seuss!

And, I can also HIGHLY recommend the entire Elephant and Piggy series. Simply brilliant.
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