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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mo WIllens Goes Hi-Tech (Sort of)
Mo Willems is one of my favorite kids' authors, mostly for his simply drawn yet totally on-target books such as the Pigeon series ("Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus") and those featuring the (unlikely) pair of Elephant and Piggie. Willems has an eye for subtle humor, and a pair of sentences or a squiggle here or there convey a great deal of (very funny)...
Published on December 29, 2008 by M. Allen Greenbaum

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2.0 out of 5 stars Good idea, but no depth
I was looking for books to read to a kindergarten class, but this did not fit the bill. Good idea for a story, but too simply written. I returned the book.
Published 7 months ago by Pinky


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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mo WIllens Goes Hi-Tech (Sort of), December 29, 2008
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
Mo Willems is one of my favorite kids' authors, mostly for his simply drawn yet totally on-target books such as the Pigeon series ("Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus") and those featuring the (unlikely) pair of Elephant and Piggie. Willems has an eye for subtle humor, and a pair of sentences or a squiggle here or there convey a great deal of (very funny) information.

Therefore, the Knuffle Bunny "series" (there are now two of them, the first won the Caldecott) represents a bit of a departure. Instead of uncluttered animal drawings against plain background, Willems places computer-aided characters against photos of urban surroundings. For example, on page 3, Willems superimposes wide-eyed, excited Trixie and her orangy-haired Dad on a sidewalk. The sidewalk is part of a photo that includes a very 50's looking black and white photo of the "Clever Barber Shop." The plot begins happily enough:

"Trixie was excited because she was taking her one-of-a-kind Knuffle Bunny someplace very special ... [turn the page] school!"

More black and white photos appear, enlivened by Willems' superimposed, computer-aided drawings of teachers, parents, and students. The merging of photo and drawing is both appealing and skillful. Willems's bright colors and mastery of physical expression ensure that the photos are always subordinate to his computer colored hand drawings (well, except in one magnificent two-page photo spread).

The book is also more talky than the simpler Willlems' fare. Here, Trixie and her very special Knuffle Bunny meet another girl, Sonja, who also has a Knuffle Bunny! Imagine wearing the same new clothes to a wedding and discovering someone wearing the same outfit: Trixie's mortification must feel 10 times worse! They fight and squabble (including a wonderful scene in which they disagree whether the "K" in "Knuffle" is silent) until the teacher takes both bunnies away.

Fast forward to night time, and Trixie somehow KNOWS that the two Bunnies got mixed up. The bunnies may look alike, but Willems seems to suggest that kids have a cerrtain bond with their special playthings, and can sense when a switcheroo has happened. Apparently, Sonja senses this too, for her dad calls Trixie's just as the latter is about to call. After a tense exchange, both girls are happy again, and they forge a strong friendship based on their mutual understanding of what it means to lose a Knuffle Bunny!

This is a more complex book than I've come to expect, and it takes a different kind of reading. His other books are straightforward and unapologetically silly, these have some serious feelings behind them. There's not as much humor, but the story-telling skill is not at all diminished--it's just more subtle. The interactions between husband and wife over whether he should get up at 2:30 am to call Sonja's family (of course he will!), the facial expressions that show dismay, relief, tension, friendship and mutual Knuffle Bunny love, all these show Willems' consummate skill as illustrator and author.

Although this is a larger-formatted book, with more words, and a more complex plot, I think that Knuffle Bunny Too is more suitable to family reading than to the classroom. It has a certain intimacy of emotion that may best be acknowledged and shared in a small group. While I have a bias towards Willems' other books, Knuffle Bunnny Too encompasses a wide range of emotions, and the creative illustrations are new and exciting.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Lessons and Cute Bunnies!, April 18, 2014
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
Hayden S., age 7, Southeast Michigan Mensa

This is story about a little girl who owns a Knuffle bunny. She goes to school with her Knuffle bunny, but she discovers that there is another bunny at show and tell. She is sad that her bunny isn’t unique. Another girl has a Nuffle bunny. Trixie and Sonja argue about their bunnies and this leads to the teacher grabbing the bunnies from the girls and placing them on a high shelf for the rest of the day. Later, the bell rings and the teacher gives the bunnies back, but she accidently gives Knuffle bunny to Sonja and Nuffle bunny to Trixie. At first, the girls don’t realize it, but in bed they can’t sleep because they notice it’s not the right bunny. Trixie and Sonja both tell their dad to make a phone call to the other’s dad. The dad’s rush across town with their daughters and exchange the bunnies. The girls are so happy and they become best friends. The next morning the girls have lots of catching up to do with playing with their bunnies.
Others would enjoy this book too. It’s a pleasant story about friendship forming and sharing. These are things that would make everyone smile.
I found it interesting that the bunnies are not actually identical. They can easily be told apart by the color of their ears and the Knuffle bunny has a bow on its head. I think the author made them different so the reader could see that the girls were given the wrong bunny and anticipate the reaction. The most useful part of the book is that it shows that friendship is more important than toys. It also teaching that sharing is a part of friendship.
I think young children up to aged seven would enjoy this book. The lessons are useful for all children and people though.
I give this book a five star rating for the good lessons and cute bunnies.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The return of Knuffle Bunny!, September 15, 2007
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
I can't honestly say who looked forward to this sequel more - me or my 2.5 yr old daughter! We both loved Knuffle Bunny, and the poor book is dog-eared by now...its been read so many times that my little one can 'read' the words even before I say them out loud, she has it memorised, words, sounds and all!

In this follow-up, Trixie is in preschool, and thinks Knuffle Bunny will be a success at school, only to find another girl has a Knuffle Bunny too! Well, I won't give too much away [the synopsis provided by Amazon is sufficient], but this sequel retains the humor & wit of its predecessor. The wonderful blend of photographs and illustrations enhance the simple story, and it is fun to read a book that truly encapsulates what it means to be a young child. Highly recommended for the very young, and young at heart!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great chapter in the "Knuffle Bunny" saga, March 31, 2008
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
This is a fun, funny sequel to Mo Willem's masterpiece, "Knuffle Bunny," one of the finest children's books in recent memory. Here, Trixie (and Knuffle Bunny) are a little bit older, and going to pre-K school... Of course, taking your toys to school can have unexpected consequences, and that's especially true when Trixie runs into another little girl... with the very same rabbit!! Willems captures the 3-4 year-old mindset as well as he did for toddlers, and this book will be a favorite of families that fell in love with the first book. Recommended! (ReadThatAgain children's book reviews)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Instant Classic!!!!, August 15, 2012
By 
David (WILTON, CT, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
I have to say just how much I love this book, and the entire Knuffle Bunny Trilogy. Especially gratifying, is that in each book, Trixie gets a little older and learns a new lesson that is appropriate for her age.

This book, like the rest of the series, is an instant classic! The style of drawings on photographs makes for a great visual experience. The story is easy enough for my 3 year olds to grasp, and yet is fun to read as an adult. Mo Willems is probably the greatest children's author since Dr. Seuss!

And, I can also HIGHLY recommend the entire Elephant and Piggy series. Simply brilliant.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Knuffle Bunny - always good, November 16, 2007
By 
Micki Gibbs (Sacramento, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
While it's not as great as the first one, this book is very funny, and perfect when, like us, you have a "knuffle bunny" in the house. Our 3 year old completely identifies with Trixie, as her own Eeyore never leaves her side. We can TOTALLY identify with the need to exchange the bunnies in the middle of the night - we'd do it too!!! Thanks Mo, for this sequel!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh out loud funny (for an adult!) too, April 21, 2009
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
Sometimes a book can leave the reader cold. Sometimes a book can reach the reader deep inside. "Knuffle Bunny Too" reached me deep inside, in that place where few books reach: the funny bone. I never know just what will set off that funny bone, what will kick it into high drive, when that bone will make me spontaneously laugh out loud. "Knuffle Bunny Too" does it.

I love Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale (Bccb Blue Ribbon Picture Book Awards (Awards)) by Mo Willems, but I do believe the sequel is twice as good (and certainly twice as long). I realize I am writing from an adult viewpoint instead of a child's, but adults must read these stories to those children. For the adult to love the story makes it so much more enjoyable in the sharing experience. (There is one book that my great-niece insists I read over and over and over. I detest that book because I don't like the story, the art, or anything about it.)

A great many children's illustrators are now giving hints of the story with their cover art, art on the end pages and on the title page. This use of visual foreshadowing and narrative back story is so clever of them that I tell my little students in the library to look for that. Sure enough, right there on the end pages are two knuffle bunnies leaning against each other. Two? Well, yes, that's the foreshadowing.

Then the back story on the double title page layout: a repetition of the marriage and birth of Trixie, who now talks. We first meet Trixie at the washateria with unobservant Dad who doesn't realize that knuffle bunny doesn't go home with the two of them. But the story ends well when Knuffle is found in the dryer--unharmed.

Now Trixie is going to to Pre-K with her one-of-a-kind bunny--until she spots Sonja with HER one-of-a-kind bunny! After arguing all morning over their bunnies, their teacher puts the pair (the bunnies) on top of a cabinet, giving us that end-page image that foreshadowed this very event!

The day ends, bunnies are restored to their owners' arms, all is well--until 2:30 am when both girls realize that neither has the right bunny. This section is the laugh out loud part. Both daddies with daughter and wrong bunny MUST rendez-vous with the other daddy and daughter and wrong bunny and make an exchange. Willems handles this like a kidnapping and ransom. Funny, funny.

How it ends is expected, but I'll let you consider what that is. If you have children in your life and give them the great gift of books, make both Knuffle Bunny books a priority. It's not the themes or even the artwork that make these books so dear. It's the surprise element, the Aha! experience, the poking at the funny bone that make these books winners.

A "laugh out loud" example? At the playground when Mom comes to take Trixie home, the look of dismay on both faces makes me laugh. I work in our After School Care two days a week. It no longer is surprising to me when either parent comes to pick up the child and the child cries to leave. It's not because the child fears the parent or doesn't want to go home. It's because the child is enjoying so much PLAYING and just wants to stay and PLAY! When I saw Willems's illustration of this situation, I laughed. I shared in his understanding. As written, my example is not funny. The humor comes in the surprise element, the unexpected when the reader first sees those facial expressions!

As for Willems's art: at first glance, it seems so elementary. On a quick study, it becomes brilliant: the use of black and white photography for the settings with comic book type colorful characters superimposed on the b/w images. It works because of Willems's use of the unexpected, the surprise element that jars the imagination.

"Knuffle Bunny Too"-- a definite must-have for your little one! It will work for you too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a delightful read - full of wit and warmth and iconic urban landscape, November 3, 2007
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This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
A self-admitted "kiddie lit" addict, I've found delightful sustenance for the child inside me in picture books written and illustrated for children, from John Barrie's "Peter Pan" to Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are", to Mo Willems' "Knuffle Bunny" and "Knuffle Bunny Too".

In this story, the young protagonist has aged out of toddlerhood, but not outgrown her Knuffle Bunny. Her attachment to the well-worn stuffed rabbit, and her trusting reliance on her weary-but-ever-ready dad to set things right, are portrayed without sappy sentimentality, but are the real stuff childhood is made of. And her competitive zeal and intuitive possessiveness give her character a very realistic "edge".

My own children are grown adults, who still love a good picture book or graphic novel, and my one grandchild lives far away, but I shared Knuffle Bunny with the young sons of a friend, while we were driving in my car, and it turned out the older boy had read the first Knuffle Bunny in school, and he eagerly read the sequel, outloud with uncharacteristic expressiveness, to his younger brother and himself. That lovely 10 minutes was, in itself, more than worth the cost of the book, which I treasure having in my library.

Sandy in Silicon Valley
former preschool/ kindergarten/ parent-toddler teacher and Brooklyn girl
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Knuffle Bunny II the return, February 15, 2008
By 
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
I loved the first book as it's short and the kid is not able to speak. It's so funny when she noticed that the bunny is not with her! This second episode is nice and deals with the problems our children can face in school.
The story is also nice but a little bit stressed. I liked more than one but I am happy to have this one. If your child liked the first I think it's a good idea to buy this book and I wil buy the third.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We read this every night!, July 16, 2008
By 
Neely P (Medford, NJ) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity (Hardcover)
My 2.5 year old daughter received this book as a gift and we have never read the first one. The story is wonderful, funny and cute and the illustrations are a very creative mix with real photography. My daughter has this book memorized now and reads it to me which is priceless. I'm getting her the first one for her 3rd birthday and I'm sure it will be a great addition to our home library.
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Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity
Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity by Mo Willems (Hardcover - September 4, 2007)
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