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Showing 1-8 of 8 questions
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When I bought mine on here they were fresh.
Feb 13, 2014 by Shawn Ramirez
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Yes it can. It is standard color film in which processing will result in a color negative. It has performed very well for me as a side note.
May 8, 2014 by Andrew D.
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This is standard 35mm film. Any camera that takes 35mm film will take this. From what I have seen online about your camera, it should be compatible as the OM10 is a standard 25mm SLR. Be sure to set your camera to the film speed rating for proper exposure. The ISO rating for this film is 400.
Oct 28, 2014 by eilif mikkelsen
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5
Aug 29, 2014 by jarrod pimental
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Consumer level (nice for snapshots) but not as forgiving regarding exposure as Portra. Ultramax tends to be grainier. A lot of people seem to think it' s Gold 400 under another name. To me the results of Portra can't be beat especially by a supermarket brand.
May 12, 2014 by Kami1019
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I was always a fan of VC vibrant color myself It seems like the newer portra might have lost some of those vibrant tones, mixed light sources always worked well but seems like to have balance very with the current emulsion, even though it is daylight balnaced. Exposure latitude is very good, the grian also go finer and i usually over expose by a third of a stop and have the lab push another stop and a thrid, and colors still come out solid. This might be spin off from the motion picture film "race" that was happening right when the Red, Arri Alexa, and other digital cameras stated to become standard in the industry. to compete kodak came out with a bit of software for digital style control of the chemical lab's process called Kodak Look Management. They also procuded a line of really advanced emulsions called Vision 1, 2, and 3. pulled this off of wikipedia, hope that it helps. Kodak introduced a new version of the Portra 400 film which replaced the NC and VC versions in late 2010. The new film incorporates a number of technological advances from the Kodak Vision line of motion pictures films. Kodak lists finer grain, improved sharpness over 400 NC and naturally rendered skin tones as some of the improvements over the existing NC and VC line.[5] Kodak also lists improved scanning performance as a feature, but the film still retains an orange mask for optical printing. The "NC" and "VC" varieties of the film were introduced to address the need for different levels of contrast and color saturation when printing, and adjusting these image attributes tend to be more difficult with traditional color darkroom printing than with digital imaging. This has influenced a decision to merge the two varieties of the film based on the assumption that most prints are currently made from digital scans which allow for these adjustments to be carried out digitally
Oct 23, 2013 by Falkwyn
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I personally used a Canoscan 9000F MK2 and they came out great.
Oct 17, 2013 by Jason
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04/2015
Sep 13, 2013 by Bronislav Pinis
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