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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
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Yes, Virginia, some of us still shoot real film; we like the ability to 'create', the ability to manipulate the negatives before printing and the look that emulsion film gives the photos are why some of us cling to old ways... somehow using the wonderful computer to do all the creativity is not the same. Just seeking to keep some of the tried and proven methods alive and well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 22, 2014
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I love this film. I wonder how long it will be with us. I had repurposed my stainless steel developing tank as a cocktail mixer but decided to go back to film for a spring fling and have fallen in love again.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 12, 2013
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Easy film to work with even if you are a film beginner. Forgiving with most developers, temps, times and techniques.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2014
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I'm a Pan F man for the most part; it's my favourite back and white film, and I love its fine grain and higher contrast than other B&W films. Everyone who knows my photographic preferences knows this: Canon cameras, Pan F B&W film, and Ektar colour film.

Ahem. I'm a sucker for fine grain, and so when I saw that TMX is supposed to have very fine grain indeed, I had to order a few rolls and give it a shot. I exposed my first test roll of the stuff in an old Pentax K-1000 (made in Hong Kong, no less) and developed it in T-MAX Developer. Talk about your deviations from the norm. I'm still learning the art of developing film, but the prescribed regime (7:30 at 68 F in T-MAX Dev) gave negatives with excellent density (hooray for somewhat accurate metering) and serviceable contrast. More importantly, the negatives scanned brilliantly for use in a hybrid workflow. I'd recommend the now-discontinued Kodak BW400CN or Ilford XP2 for those serious about pursuing a hybrid B&W workflow, since those films are dye-based and work with the dust-removal algorithms of modern film scanners, but for serious B&W devotees, there is no substitute for silver-based films. Note that the box says "finest grain," not "non-existent grain."

Grain is fine yet visible; your scans will let you know that there's some texture there but it's not distracting like it would be with a faster film. (Before anyone asks: yes, I do appreciate the utility of grain as a form of artistic expression, but nobody using a 100-speed film is going to be considering grain a part of the medium. Want grain? Push some Tri-X or HP5, or shoot Delta or TMZ.)

Sharpness was merely OK, but I put that down to the glass I exposed this lens through: the SMC Pentax-A 50 mm f/2 was never known to be excessively sharp. With better glass, obviously, your results will be better. I shot this film, as I shoot almost all my B&W film, through an orange contrast filter (I prefer the Hoya multi-coated O(G) filters for this) to accentuate contrast more than with the standard yellow filter.

This film wants a fine-grain developer, like Kodak T-Max or Ilford DD-X, to live up to its full potential. You can soup it in any developer, however, and get serviceable results with sane exposures. I prefer this film to its faster sibling, TMY, and I think I'll find it useful for landscape work where I don't need the crazy contrast of Pan F. Like Peppy Hare says in Starfox 64, just shoot it, Fox!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2013
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Needed some last minute film for a trip I was taking and took advantage of Amazon's great price and my 2 day shipping. Arrived as expected, the film was fresh with a decent expiration. Thank you Amazon!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 4, 2011
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This is one of the finest B/W films ever made. This film is a little picky when it comes to development, but once you figure it out, the results are unmatched by any other film or Photoshop technique.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 23, 2013
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This stuff is great. It makes people look like 1940s movie stars. Just be aware you need a lot of light or a flash. The Tmax 400 is a little less fussy but not quite as gorgeous.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 20, 2013
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Simply an excellent film. Be prepared to hunt for a processor though - most 'local' processors only process c-41 film.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2013
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I didn't realize it's hard to get true B&W film developed anymore...I had to send this to San Francisco to get it developed! Look for B&W film that can be developed using the C41 process (i.e., Walgreens) such as those made by Ilford. The photos from this film were awesome, but it take time and money for the developing because you will probably need to send it off in the mail somewhere.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2014
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Prefer this to Delta 100 (can't explain why), strong family resemblance to tmax 400 so shots look the same. Slower, but somewhat less grain and more detail. Very beautiful, but less flexible than 400.
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