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Konga


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Product Details

  • Actors: Grace Arnold, George Barrows, Nicholas Bennett, Herman Cohen (II), Jess Conrad
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English (PCM Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: December 6, 2005
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000BITV0Q
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #45,735 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Konga" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Lost in the African jungles for over a year, Dr. Charles Decker (Michael Gough, Horror Hospital) has returned to England with Konga, a baby chimpanzee. Disappearing into his lab, the mad botanist begins work on what he believes will be his greatest achievement. Having witnessed a Baganda witchdoctor’s use of a rare carnivorous plant to produce accelerated animal growth, Decker injects Konga with the same serum. Using the gorilla-sized chimp to brutally murder his enemies, Decker himself soon becomes victim to Konga's uncontrollable rage. Grabbing the scientist, the berserk chimp – who's grown to monstrous size – breaks out of the lab and rampages through London, a city whose salvation rests with the military, who's been ordered to destroy Konga at all costs.

Customer Reviews

Okay, so there's this GIANT gorilla, or more so, a man in a GIANT gorilla suit!
abcpc1
One doesn't hear a lot about this movie but it's one of my all-time favorites - highly recommended for fans of the genre.
Patrick W. Crabtree
Either way KONGA is one of those movies that is so bad that it's good and they just don't make em like that anymore.
Chip Kaufmann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By cookieman108 on January 15, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In the last of the successful co-productions between American International Pictures (AIP) and producer Herman Cohen comes Konga (1961), which Herman not only co-producer, but also shared in the writing credits. Some of their most famous collaborations included I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) and I Was a Teenage Frankenstein (1957), neither of which, as I write this, are available as of yet on DVD, but should be (Konga was produced with the working title I Was a Teenage Gorilla)...anyway, directed by John Lemont (The Frightened City), the film stars Michael Gough, who appeared in a number of Cohen's features including Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), Black Zoo (1963), Berserk! (1968), but many movie goers will probably recognize him from some of his later films, including his appearances in the various Batman films as Bruce Wayne's butler Alfred Pennyworth. Also appearing is Margo Johns (This Is My Street), Jess Conrad (The Assassination Bureau), Claire Gordon (Beat Girl), and George Barrows, as Konga...interestingly enough this wasn't George's first (or last) time donning a big, hairy gorilla suit, as he appeared in Robot Monster (1953), as Ro-Man, the alien with a gorilla body and a diver's helmet for a head, along with Gorilla at Large (1954), as Goliath the Gorilla, Black Zoo (1963), as The Ape, and finally in Hillbillys (sic) in a Haunted House (1967), as Anatole the gorilla...

As the film begins we see a small plane crashing into the African jungle, one carrying famed, English botanist Dr. Charles Decker (Gough), thought to have perished in the accident.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By joseph Corey on October 9, 2005
Format: DVD
This was originally put out on VHS as part of the Midnite Movie series, but in order to cash in on Kong-mania, Sony is putting it out as a solo release.

Dr. Decker comes back from Africa with a secret way of growing plants and animals to huge sizes. He decides to make a chimp huge so that he can take care of his enemies. Konga becomes enormous and attacks London. That's right - giant ape rampages in London.

If you're going to go Big Ape crazy on DVD in the season of the Kong, this is essential for your collection.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chip Kaufmann TOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 6, 2009
Format: DVD
Leave it to B movie mogul Herman Cohen (I WAS A TEENAGE WEREWOLF) to give us two movies for the price of one low budget effort and that's what KONGA is. The first hour of the film is remarkably well done with an intelligent script (under the circumstances) and a creative use of color for the background sets. The unique carnivorous plants are cleverly done and the movie is professionally shot by celebrated cameraman Desmond Dickinson (HORROR HOTEL/CITY OF THE DEAD). Add to that an increasingly demented performance by Michael Gough as the mad doctor and a study in feminine frustration from Margo Johns as his assistant and you had the makings of a true classic. However once the "gorilla" enters the picture, it, as the Brits would say, "goes straight into the crapper".

I don't have any qualms about them using a guy in a gorilla suit but this is the worst gorilla suit I have ever seen. It was borrowed from celebrated "apeman" George Barrows who should have been hired because whoever they got had no idea how to act like a monkey. Once KONGA was introduced , it's as if the filmmakers knew the jig was up and they just threw in the towel. The special effects become increasingly substandard and there isn't even a pretense of disguising how bad they are. The last fifteen minutes of the film left the audience in hysterics according to people who saw it in 1961 and it's easy to see why. That's what makes KONGA such a guilty pleasure. Adding to the fun is the fact that the cast plays it with an incredibly straight face with no hint of camp. The final shot of the poor little chimp lying dead in the street has to be seen to be believed.

The remarkable thing about this DVD (as mentioned in an earlier review) is how good it looks. I had never seen KONGA in color before much less in widescreen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Otto Correct TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 25, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Let me count the ways (spoilers, if you don't mind):

1. MICHAEL GOUGH - If you only know Michael Gough's work as that one scientist that briefly showed up in "Top Secret" or as Alfred in the Batman movies from the late 80's through the 90's, you're in for quite a treat. I can't think of a single better mad scientist than Gough's Charles Decker in this film (Donald Murphy comes close in "Frankenstein's Daughter" but he's still got nothing on Gough). Decker is arrogant, amoral, and completely blind to the ridiculousness of his own actions (more on that later) and Gough is clearly having a wonderful time running wild with the role, chewing the scenery like a madman. Its truly a wonder to behold. My favorite moment is when we get a long shot of him deliving a fast and vicious tirade to the dean of his college and throughout the whole shot you actually can see the vein in Gough's forehead grow bigger and bigger. He's truly an incredible ham in this movie, and I mean that in the very best possible way. No actor living or dead could've played Decker and made this movie any better than it is with Michael Gough in the lead role.

2. THE PACING - This is a movie that just keeps on moving. Unlike a lot of other monster flicks where the first two acts are mostly just talking leading up to the big, monster-y finish, the action in "Konga" is spread out in good size bursts throughout the film, with the plot moving briskly inbetween. Speaking of plot...

3. THE CHARACTERS KEEP DOING RIDICULOUS THINGS - Dr. Decker, boiling his serum that grows animals into bigger animals, doesn't keep his eye on the pot, where it boils over on the floor and his housecat starts lapping it up. His response? He immediately grabs a revolver (!) from his desk drawer and SHOOTS THE CAT!!!
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