Kosmos

July 9, 1991 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:05
30
2
9:17
30
3
6:48
30
4
6:22
30
5
6:23
30
6
4:49
30
7
3:29
30
8
12:35
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 9, 1991
  • Release Date: July 9, 1991
  • Label: RCA Victor
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001BG4FOE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,889 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
71%
4 star
29%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 14 customer reviews
It is also produced in surround sound.
Michael Kohlman
The newly remastered High Performance Super CD from 2000 is 24/96 Audiophile Quality on any player, and adds "Prelude To The Afternoon of a Faun," also by Debussy.
Jeff N
There are some sweeping and haunting moments on the album and creepy, mechanical atmospherics that renders Kosmos my favorite album by Isao Tomita.
Jeffrey J.Park

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jeff N VINE VOICE on March 4, 2002
Format: Audio CD
June 2014 Major Update!

This is my CLASSICAL TOMITA GUIDE with REVIEWS and QUALITY COMPARISONS, but first I have some Exciting News for you! TOMITA has released Six New (Super Audio) SACDs in Discrete 4 Channel Sound - the very definition of QUADRAPHONIC!! (so much better than the Surround Sound you hear while watching DVDs or TV.) The three Classical re-releases are CLAIR DE LUNE (SNOWFLAKES ARE DANCING), PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION, and THE PLANETS!! These are almost like totally new albums. Mr. TOMITA himself did new sounds, music, and multi-track mixes for most of the original tracks on CLAIR DE LUNE and PLANETS. He even created some totally new tracks! All the SACDs are Hybrids (playable on any player) and the DSD (Direct-Stream Digital) tracks are very clean, with pure bright highs and deep powerful bass.

* * * * * * * * *

CLASSICAL TOMITA GUIDE with REVIEWS

In TOMITA's music I have found serene beauty, relaxation, landscapes of wonder, mysterious spaces, thrilling excitement, fascinating dimensions, inspiration, and some fun. The music he creates is more natural, mellow, and rich, with more depth, color, imagery, feeling, and thought than any other synthesized music I have ever heard. He makes classical music come alive, with never before seen, heard, or felt images and sounds.

As a person who began collecting TOMITA and other electronic music when I was 19 in 1979, plus the original symphony orchestra versions of the classical music that TOMITA used, I hope you consider me qualified to create the following list of TOMITA albums and review them as well. Thank you all so much for the votes.

MUSIC REVIEWS FIRST ...
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By James Schulze on June 7, 2003
Format: Audio CD
If one can get past the laughably bad Star Wars opening track, this album is a stunner. Though lacking the fluid continuity of his previous efforts, Tomita manages to select darker, more beautiful, and more moody pieces than before, creating an incredible dream-like atmosphere without resorting to the usual space-ship and "alien" sounds that tarnished The Planets and The Bermuda Triangle. His sound became larger, more ambient, and denser. The final Bach medley "The Sea Named Solaris" is Tomita's finest hour, and this album is a must for any fan or Tomita's work, or of electronic music. A flawed but still great work.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 29, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I have this album in vinyl, should be better without background hiss. Star Wars theme is quite interesting, lovers of "the force" should be impressed. Worth every dime.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on November 18, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is yet another great album by Isao Tomita that presents his interpretations and adaptations of famous works by Grieg, Charles Ives, and J.S. Bach (amongst others) played entirely on synthesizers. Although Kosmos (1978) opens on a humorous note with the Stars War theme (which includes a snippet of what sounds like two robots humming in a call and answer fashion and then laughing because one of them messes the answer up), this is a pretty dark album overall.

The eight tracks on the album range in length from 3:28 to the lengthy closing track The Sea Named "Solaris" (12:26). There are some sweeping and haunting moments on the album and creepy, mechanical atmospherics that renders Kosmos my favorite album by Isao Tomita. I think that what I appreciate the most about the compositions on Kosmos is that while they deviate quite a ways from the original work, they are engaging, humorous at times, and fairly involved for electronica - Isao is very good at incorporating dynamics and squeezing a large number of tone colors out of his synthesizers. In this respect I would class him with other great progressive electronic composers like Larry Fast (Synergy) and Vangelis.

All in all, this is a fine album of progressive electronic music. Kosmos is very highly recommended along with Snowflakes are Falling (1974) and The Tomita Planets (1976).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dannan Tavona on August 12, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Through all the albums I've heard by Isao Tomita, he infuses the original composition often with a distinctive style, often very traditionally Japanese in the way the musical phrase is rendered. The Star Wars piece is fun, almost deliberately silly. Included is "The Sea Named Solaris" - which was inspired by the Tarkovsky film, which in turn was based on the Stanislaw Lem story. And anyone who's seen a circus will recognize "Hora Staccatto" and see how he's rendered the tune in his own style. The other tracks are by turns grand, thoughtful, pensive, and reworked into something new. Tomita's version of Rodrigo's "Aranjuez" has a haunting quality and has been a favorite of mine for many years. Arguably, Tomita's version of Holst's "The Planets" is a superior album, and I've come to prefer it to the classical renditions of the suite. Nonetheless, KOSMOS is a great mix of different composers for a solid exposure to Tomita's music, and even decades after its initial release, continues to hold up well. Like another pioneer, Wendy Carlos (she's a real genius!), most of Tomita's early albums were renditions of classical music in the electronica style. If you like this one, I'd also recommend Tomita's version of "The Planets" and "The Bermuda Triangle" -- the later which includes some of Tomita's own pieces.
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