Kreg KMA2675 Kreg Rip-Cut
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117 of 122 people found the following review helpful
on May 7, 2012
Having purchased and owned several Kreg products in the past, I was not hesitant to try the Rip Cut by Kreg. As a casual observer, I could tell that the intent of this product was to allow the user to adapt their own saw to the tool, cut straight rips through sheet products and most of all, do so without the use of a pencil or straight edge or even tape measure.

With all Kreg products, you will find that the Rip Cut comes in a good package with all loose items secured in heavy bags and as usual, everything in it's place. The device assembles easily with a few screws, nuts and plastic / poly parts. The saw base is attached to the blue Kreg saw base using a pair of metal hold down clips with pointed set screws. The saw base then slides onto the straight edge and with the friction clamp, it holds your saw at your set distance with no problem.

Using the Rip Cut is fast and easy. It's a good idea to readjust the red pointer every time you remount the saw to the base but the process is fast and simple. I just measured from the edge of the sheet product over 12" and marked it with a pencil. Place the saw on the mark (or off to the blade width side) with the edge guide firmly against the edge of the sheet and slide the red indicator to match up with the 12" mark on the straight edge. Tighten the screws on the red indicator and you are good to go. One nice thing is that if you want to make a rip, just slide the base along the straight edge, lock in your distance with the cam lock and cut away. If you want to make a cross cut or other cut that does not need the straight edge or guide, simply release the cam lock, slide the saw with the blue base attached all the way to the end and off of the straight edge and viola... you have your circular saw free from the Rip Cut so you can make all the other cuts you need. When it's time to make another sheet rip, simply slide it in place, lock it down and away you go. Very convenient.

I was able to cut a couple dozen sheets of 4 x 8 goods down to 2 x 8 with no measuring or marking. Simply slide the guide along the outer edge of your sheet goods and in a matter of about 10 seconds, you have an 8' long cut that is as straight and accurate as any factory sheet edge. The Rip Cut is very light and yet strong and durable. I found it to be well worth the 34 dollars I spent on it at the local Lowes big box store.

I did put some Johnson's Paste Wax on all surfaces that will contact other surfaces prior to the first use. I can't tell if there is a difference but I can say that the saw, guide and guide bar slid like magic. There is one thing that is not "bad" but just something to pay attention to. The Blue saw base tends to droop a bit as it has no way of attaching to the back of the saw base itself. It is not a show stopper by any means but it just give the saw / guide as a whole a bit of a loose feeling. Truly it's just a mental thing more than anything else.

I would gladly recommend this to a friend or family member if they find that the awkward handling of full size sheet goods on a table saw is uncomfortable or if they use clamped straight edges to get that fast rip cut on several pieces of sheet goods. Use it 6 times a year and you'll be thrilled you got one... use it just 2 times a year and well... maybe you'd do better spending that money on clamps or other common place tools for the shop.

Here's to cutt'n up...
Larry
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99 of 106 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon May 14, 2012
Compared to those overpriced plastic T-squares that pass as rip guides, this thing is a lot better in many ways--it's more accurate, a whole lot sturdier, and it works no matter which direction your blade faces.

Assembly is surprisingly complicated. It shouldn't be beyond you if you do a lot of building, but I have absolutely no idea why the little plastic clamping thing with all the little parts couldn't be pre-assembled in the package.

Attaching it to the saw involves driving a couple of pointed set screws into the metal plate on the saw itself. Depending on where your saw's angle adjustment levers fall, tightening these down in a suitable location may be very, very difficult, and it's never going to be super secure on the sled as there's really nothing more than friction holding it in place. The more you tighten, the more the attachment brackets want to lift up out of the plastic, and it's not difficult to imagine them busting right out of it, ruining the entire thing.

Actually making cuts is a two-handed affair--one to push the saw and the other to make sure the guide bar runs flush against the edge of the board throughout. If you're making a very narrow cut, this will place one hand very, very, very close to the blade. Be extremely careful.

If you're cutting large sheets of things the way they do in the demo videos, it's pretty easy to clamp them down and make your cuts. If you're ripping narrower boards, you're going to find that there is absolutely no way that you can clamp them down to anything and still get this guide to traverse the length of the cut--it's just too darn long and it will always hit the clamps. The only thing you can do is nail the board you're cutting to another board underneath it and sacrifice a quarter inch or so in the process. Not the end of the world for pine, but if you've got some expensive hardwood you're looking to make the most of, you really need something more expensive than this aftermarket attachment. I'm contemplating taking an angle grinder to mine and making it a whole lot shorter as I rarely need to make rip cuts wider than four inches.

It absolutely will not take the place of a real rail-guided saw, but it's OK for what they're charging.
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
on June 13, 2012
As I was assembling this tool I noticed the measuring guide was off about 1/16" to the left. The "0" mark was left of the board edge, so knowing there was no fix that I could make, I called Kreg support and explained the problem, after which they sent out a new one and included an RMA shipping tag for the defective one. I did not call Amazon for a return since this was a quality control issue for Kreg. The replacement clamp was spot on, so we got to work.

I still grade this tool a "5" even with the problem. Outstanding customer service always trumps a rare problem. Buy this little rip tool, it saves time, no tedious measuring or using long clamps that can and do stress out of alignment. My darling helped me rip 3 full sheets of Cabinet Birch plywood into 16" and 24" sections taking only 20 minutes to do. Outstanding! And the edges were square, with no burn marks or slippage of the saw blade. Kudos to Kreg, another winner.
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42 of 48 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2012
Senior Engineering Students had the table saw fail during a project. They were, "not so good", at telling a technician about the problem. When I arrived needing to rip two sheets of plywood I stood in awe of there inability to communicate. The fact the saw broke is due probably to normal wear. The fact the problem went unreported by SENIOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS....

Plan "B" was the Kreg Rip-Cut. It went together quickly. It worked perfectly. I have one wish and one recommendation. Rec. - Put some silicone spray on the aluminum track. Wish - The entire plate holding the saw was metal. I worry it is too much plastic in the wrong place. Time will tell on durability.

A rail MAY cut straighter but you need to consider; 1. How many cuts do you need to do?. Can you reset the rail accurately, multiple times to make repeat cuts? Do you have an accurate rail which is long enough? My compromise for lack of a table saw was the Rip-Cut so I could get eight rips the same size in a time little longer than it would take on the table saw.

I paid the full suggested retail price of $34.99. Check the Kreg site. On 22 May 2012 their price was $34.99. I have no idea where the "List" price of $44.99 was found. I found about $35 was the most you will pay.

This is my second Kreg tool. I have used the Kreg Jig, (Master System) for a year.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on December 6, 2012
this rip-cut guide works okay - until you get to the end of the piece, where the saw still has a couple of inches to go, but the cross bar has gone off the end of the piece, making it extremely difficult - if not impossible on some cuts to get a perfect straight cut all the way through the piece. the concept needs to be re-worked. The way it is, most craftsmen will just go back to using guide boards and clamps to accomplish the same thing and this jig will gather dust in the corner.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on March 2, 2013
I had an 8 1/2' aluminum guide with a track on the bottom to allow 2 clamps to hold the bar to the sheet good being cut. Lent it to a friend and got back the clamps, no guide. I really liked this system but alas, it was gone.

I saw this tool at Lowes and picked it up as I had several full sheets of ply that I needed to break down. It looked cheap but I have several Kreg tools and they have all been great so I forked over the cash and took one home. I have a Skil Model 77 saw and it was a tight fit but it did fit to the guide. Calibration for the scale to determine cut position took about 30 seconds and it is dead n**s accurate. This is my favorite part of the system. If you need to make a 19 5/16" cut you move the guide to that position, lower the clamp handle and cut away. No more 19 5/16" + 2 3/8" calculations to allow for the distance from the edge of the guide + distance from the edge of the saw base plate to the edge of the blade (old system that got lost). Then marking your sheet good with pencil and then aligning the guide bar and clamping it down. With the Kreg tool you literally just slide the guide to 19 5/16" and you are done. I am so thankful that my original tool was lost.

This tool just plain works well. I highly recommend it.

LF
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
I ordered the Kreg Rip-Cut because I was having a difficult time making straight cuts on large pieces of wood (over 4' X 4') on my table saw. Every time I used the table saw the cuts were not even or straight. I went online to look for help on cutting straight lines on a table saw and the Kreg Rip-Cut popped up in one of the windows. After reading about it and watching the video I ordered it immediately. When I received it and got it out of the box I was worried that my older circular saw (over 15 years) would not fit on the jig. However, once I got everything out of the bags and read the directions I had no problem fitting it perfectly on my saw.

Once I used it I was in love. You simply set the measuring gauge, make the cut and that cut is the correct width and is straight. I will never worry again when buying large sheet goods from the store. Knowing I have the Kreg Rip-Cut, I can cut anything, any size to a nice straight cut. Once I have the wood cut down to a pieces I can handle, using the table saw for the finishing cuts won't be a problem anymore. I will be recommending the Kreg Rip-Cut to anyone who will listen and will probably be talking about it to those who don't even do woodworking. I finally get to talk about this great product that actually works the way it's supposed to which makes my woodworking jobs so much easier, more enjoyable and less stressful.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 18, 2013
I'm a professional woodworker in a small shop. The vast majority of what I make is bed frames, which are solid wood. My small shop really isn't set up to handle sheet goods, so when I make drawers I have to cut the plywood sheets down on my driveway and then bring the pieces inside and do the final, precision cutting. Even with one of those handy self-clamping straightedges, it took a while to make the cuts. While I can't do all of the cuts I need with the 24" capacity of the Rip-Cut, it does help a lot with the narrower pieces.

I normally use a big heavy old Skil 77 worm-drive saw for this sort of thing, but discovered that the Rip-Cut just isn't designed to handle such a beast. I bought a cheap regular circular saw and dedicated it to the Rip-Cut and it works great. The way the Rip-Cut attaches to the saw is a bit chintzy but it does work. I suppose I could just screw it onto the saw since I won't need to take the saw off.

The plastic components of this are what keep me from giving it a full 5 stars. I understand that it would cost more if everything was metal, but it might make sense to have the option of metal parts. The locking device, while quite effective, does tend to stick on the rail a bit, especially when there's sawdust in there.

Overall it's a great little tool made by a company that makes great tools. I highly recommend dedicating a saw to the Rip-Cut, unless you're on a reallly tight budget (the Skil saw I got was only $40).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 2014
What the other reviewers have said is spot on. I love the concept and if product design had been executed a little better, it would be great.

The good: Once it has been calibrated and the user is very careful to keep the guide pressed firmly against the sheet good being cut, a pretty accurate cut can be achieved. My suggestion: practice on scrap first until you get the hang of it.

The not so good:

#1: As others have said, there is a place for plastic and it is definitely NOT in the critical or high stress points in this guide. In my opinion, the base plate should absolutely be a heavy duty aluminum. There are only 2 anchor points, located in the front of the saw, which secure the guide to the saw. Although the screws are metal and the brackets that hold the saw are pot metal, they bolt onto the blue plastic base plate. The instructions caution not to over-tighten....well duh! It's plastic! However, because these are the only 2 points attaching the saw, they by necessity need to be tightened very firmly! It would be nice if the rear of the saw could be anchored as well, which would slightly lessen the need for torquing the screws in the front so tightly.

#2: Another thing to note is that unless you are planning on leaving the base plate permanently attached to the saw, it will have to be recalibrated each time it is reattached. It can be very awkward holding the saw with one hand while trying to reattach the base plate. It's a PITA so I'm leaving mine attached for now.

#3: The base plate had to be offset by about an inch from the base of my Skil saw in order to center the blade and get the scale to read accurately, which makes the already too feeble base even more awkward. Be sure to center the saw blade in which ever of the 2 base plate "wells" you use (depending on whether your saw motor is on the left or right side). I initially didn't and quickly found that the adjustable indicator wouldn't slide far enough to the right to zero it out despite my blade being positioned at zero distance from the guide. The directions don't mention it but it will throw your distance readings off if the blade is not centered in the wells properly.

#4: This device prevents the work piece from being clamped within guide rail distance of the blade (up to about 30 inches, depending on how wide a piece is being cut). In other words, if you are trying to cut a work piece that is smaller than 30 inches or so, you will have no where to clamp it since the guide rail will run into the clamps.

#5: Lastly, as the others have said, because the guide part that slides along the edge of the work piece is not long enough in relation to the saw, the last several inches can be problematic to get a straight cut. My solution is to lay an extra piece that is the same thickness as my work piece butted up next to it, with the edge flush with the piece being cut so that the guide does not run out of edge to guide it straight at the end of the cut.

Ultimately, the question is this, is this guide easier and/or more accurate than using a guide rail or guide board clamped to the workpiece like most of us do? Not really. It's nice not having to mark a line but I don't think it's easier or more accurate. Overall, it is a good idea, but needs improvement.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on December 26, 2013
I used this with a Craftsman 7 1/4" saw to cross cut a 24" x 8 ft plywood piece. This thing seemed like a good idea, until you actually use it. See that blue plastic guide on the right side of the picture? It is supposed to sit flush against the side of your wood piece so that the Kreg guide will glide along it. Well, when you reach near the end of your cut, like the last 4-6 inches, the blue plastic guide is no longer touching the side of your work piece so you end up having to freehand the last 4-6 inches yourself, which defeats the purpose of having a guide in the first place. It was a good idea, but bad execution by Kreg. Had they have the foresight to make that blue plastic guide longer to about 12 inches, that would guarantee that the guide will still be touching the side of your wood piece. I bought another 53" guide clamp on here that works much better so I'm returning this one.
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