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L.A. Confidential [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger
  • Directors: Curtis Hanson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Original recording remastered, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: German (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby TrueHD 5.1), Italian (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Chinese, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Swedish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: September 23, 2008
  • Run Time: 138 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (774 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000Q8QH0I
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,738 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "L.A. Confidential [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Commentary by critic-historian Andrew Sarris, James Ellroy, Russell Crowe, Kevin Spacey, Guy Pearce, James Cromwell, Ruth Myers, David Strathairn, Kim Basinger, Brian Helgeland, Jeannine Oppewall, Dante Spinotti, and Danny DeVito
  • Whatever You Desire: Making L.A. Confidential
  • Sunlight and Shadow: The Visual Style of L.A. Confidential
  • A True Ensemble: The Cast of L.A. Confidential
  • L.A. Confidential: From Book to Screen
  • L.A. Confidential TV series pilot
  • Off-the-record: vintage cast/creator interviews
  • Director Curtis Hanson's photo pitch
  • The L.A. of L.A. Confidential interactive map tour
  • Music-only track (5.1) showcasing Jerry Goldsmith's score
  • Trailer gallery

Editorial Reviews

Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Kim Basinger. Three cops. A call girl...a mysterious millionaire. Set against the backdrop of the glitz, glamour, grit and noir of early '50s L.A., the plot coils through corruption, sex, lies and murder following an incident at a coffee shop. But that's just the beginning! Based on the crime fiction novel by James Ellroy. 2 Discs. 1997/color/138 min/R.

Customer Reviews

One of the best movies I've ever seen.
GeValero
It has great acting from Russell Crowe, Kevin Spacey, Kim Basinger and an outstanding performance from Guy Pearce.
Mike T.
The acting is great and the story is good.
Dennis R. Smith, Jr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

110 of 116 people found the following review helpful By Richardson TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 20, 2008
Format: DVD
Rather than review this amazing modern Noir...I just want to say..BUY this new version...it looks fabulous and the bonus features are PLENTIFUL and very meaty with content and the good news is they ALSO have brought over the features from the first release allowing all of us to dump that one and that isn't always the case. They also have a nearly 1 hr TV movie/pilot called LA CONFIDENTIAL starring Keifer Sutherland which is fun. There is also a bonus CD disc of music which is icing on the cake. I just spent a few hours watching all the bonus features and will absolutely watch them again ( a rarity) and as I said..the movie never looked better..I've only checked out a bit of the commentary which has a staggering number of contributors and should make another viewing of the movie with it running a fun trip indeed. WB does it well when they re-issue and not just with the sexy new cover image ..this baby got a complete overhaul...

enjoy!
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70 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Sam Bethune on July 28, 2000
Format: DVD
"LA Confidential" takes detective film noir in a different direction-something I didn't think could be done. Director Curtis Hanson stated that he wanted the focus of this period piece to be on the characters and dialogue rather than the locations, clothing, cars, etc. I think he got it right for the most part, but the cinematography is so spectacular that you can't help but notice the backdrops against which the scenes are set.
The acting performances in this picture are for the most part first rate: Guy Pearce plays the ambitious Edmund Exley to perfection, Russell Crowe is superb as tough guy detective Bud White, and Kevin Spacey (one of my favorite actors of all time) turns in a stellar performance as the hip narco detective who also acts as a consultant on a Dragnet-like TV series. Strong performances by James Cromwell, Ron Rifkin, and the ubiquitous David Strathairn round out the picture. Although I liked Kim Basinger, I thought she was cast more for her look than for her acting skills. She played the role of a Veronica-lake lookalike prostitute quite well, but hers didn't look like a performance any other competent actress couldn't have pulled off.
The DVD version of this picture is more full of features than any other title I've owned thus far. It includes a documentary about the making of the film which includes cast interviews and clips of Crowe's and Pearce's screen tests. There's also a location map that tells the viewer about each of the major locations where scenes were shot, cast bios, a promo for the soundtrack (featuring some very good early 50's jazz courtesy of Chet Baker and other artists of the era), and the movie can be played with just the soundtrack running.
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112 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Themis-Athena on January 20, 2002
Format: DVD
What is a good cop? One who joined the police force because he was unable to save his mother from being killed by an abusive husband, but who now uses violence not only against wife-beaters but whenever called for by his superior officers; be it to beat a confession out of a suspect
or to discourage criminals from settling in town? Or one who joined the police force to emulate his father, a department legend; to go after "Rollo Tommasi" (the guy who thinks he can get away with anything), but who thereafter lets his career and department politics dictate his actions? Or, in the end, is it the one who has let corruption wipe out so thoroughly the reasons why he once joined the police force that he doesn't even remember a single one of them, but who for once in his life still finds it in himself to go after real criminals, even at the risk of his own life? This is just one, although maybe the central question asked in "L.A. Confidential," the movie based on James Ellroy's novel with the same name. And as does the book, the movie refuses to provide an answer to this and the other questions it asks.

The story is set up by tabloid editor Sid Hudgens (Danny DeVito), who during the movie's opening credits gleefully sums up the L.A. clichés that still hold true today: "Come to Los Angeles! The sun shines bright, the beaches are wide and inviting, ... there are jobs aplenty, and land is cheap. Every working man can have his own house, and inside the house a happy, all American family. You can have all this, and who knows, you can even be discovered - become a movie star or at least, singer. Life is good in Los Angeles: it's paradise on earth." Laughing sarcastically, however, he adds: "That's what they tell ya', anyway, 'cause they're selling an image.
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45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on May 7, 2005
Format: DVD
Manohla Dargis, a film critic for The New York Times and former editor for the L.A. Weekly film section, presented L.A. Confidential, one of her favorite movies, for the Cal State Northridge Cinemateque Critics Series, where I saw this film a few weeks ago. The film was followed by an insightful Q & A between Dargis and David Kipen, a book critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, and continued with answers to questions from members of the audience.

As mentioned by Dargis, L.A. Confidential was released in 1997 to huge critical acclaim. It went on to be nominated for nine Academy Awards and is now considered a key film for the 90s. In fact, in answer to a question from an audience member, Dargis feels that had Titanic been released another year, L.A. Confidential would have garnered all the major awards of 1997. Although it didn't, it is still widely regarded as one of the best movies of that year.

Based on the novel by James Ellroy, the film is a dark and gritty noir set in 1950s Los Angeles and deals with police corruption and Hollywood sleaze. The seemingly idyllic Los Angeles of the early 1950s provides the glitzy backdrop for the grisly crime that is the focus of the story: a bloody shotgun slaying of the patrons at an all-night diner. One of the victims was Dick Stensland, a subpar police officer forced into retirement after a drunken brutality incident not long before his death.

Heading the investigation are three very different cops.
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