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LATITUDE 38 Kindle Edition

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Length: 273 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 823 KB
  • Print Length: 273 pages
  • Publisher: Schiller & Wells, Ltd., An Imprint of Stay Thirsty Publishing, A Division of Stay Thirsty Media, Inc. (November 9, 2013)
  • Publication Date: November 9, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004XWQ3I4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #923,800 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Ron Hutchison began writing fiction full time at the age of 66 after a long career in journalism and public relations. Hutchison hitchhiked across America during the time between his graduation from high school in 1958 and beginning college three years later. He worked in Colorado steel mill, a Nevada cattle ranch, a Chicago food-processing plant, and a New York bowling alley were he set pins. Hutchison graduated from the University of Missouri in 1967 with a degree in journalism. He later worked as a reporter, editor, and columnist at newspapers in Texas, California, and Missouri. He was employed by a major oil company as a public relations executive, and later operated his own public relations agency. He created the board game Sixth Sense in 2003. Ron lives in Joplin, Missouri, and enjoys golf and hiking.

NOVELS BY RON HUTCHISON

Voices of the Locusts:From his deathbed, 81-year-old Jack O'Brien reveals to his grandson the existence of a long-forgotten story he wrote as a teenager years earlier while living in Japan. The 16-year-old grandson finds the story in an old footlocker in his grandfather's attic, and spends days pouring over the real-life account. Set at a U.S. military base in rural Japan in 1948, and playing out against a backdrop of swirling post-War social change, Jack's Voices of the Locusts tells the story of three families--one black, one white, one Asian. The story also recounts Jack's love for a Japanese girl, Fujiko Kobaysi, who has been promised in marriage by her parents to an older man. Told in vivid and sometimes haunting detail, Jack and Fujiko are frustrated in their romantic quest by story characters coming to terms (often violently) with the emotional scars of World War II. (This novel contains language that might be offensive to some readers, and is recommended for mature young adults.)

Santa Fe Crazy: Santa Fe Crazy tells the story of Howard Spoon. Fed up with life in Decatur, Illinois, Howard divorces his wife, sells his dental practice, and moves to Santa Fe, New Mexico to marry a rich widow. Howard knows Santa Fe is overrun with rich widows--he read it in a magazine. With help from George Bad Toe, a full-time entrepreneur and part-time scam artist, Howard meets Charlie Malpin, a wealthy Santa Fe heiress. What Howard discovers about Charlie--and ultimately himself--throws his satirical world into a tailspin.

REVIEW BY "A CUSTOMER": Santa Fe Crazy had me laughing out loud - on a plane. The people around me thought I was nuts. Sorry, it's just that this hapless dentist is atypical in every sense of the word. So are the people he meets. Nothing in this book is predictable, especially the ending. Don't try to guess. Just read it and laugh.

Latitude 38: Diego Sanchez and his wife Adriana are deeply in love. Their world is shattered when Adriana is diagnosed with terminal cancer. After gut-wrenching deliberation, they opt for doctor-assisted suicide.Wee problem. Crippled by ninety years of blistering partisan debate over the questions of euthanasia, gun control, capital punishment, school prayer, and same-sex marriages--and fearing total anarchy after the bloody Pro-Choice riots a year earlier--the United States is now two separate republics. The border between them is closed. Diego and Adriana must flee across the dangerous border.

REVIEW BY JEFF GRAUBART: I started reading Latitude 38 early this afternoon. Now, late in the evening, I've finished, and save a 30 minute dinner break, I couldn't stop reading. Hutchison proves himself a master of action and suspense.

NOVELS BY CHRISTOPHER CLOUD:

A Boy Called Duct Tape: Pablo Perez is a 12-year-old kid without much going for him. His classmates have dubbed him "Duct Tape" because his tattered discount-store sneakers are held together with...you guessed it, duct tape. He can't escape the bullying. Pablo's luck changes after he finds a $20 gold coin while swimming with his sister in a river near his home. Pablo later buys a $1 treasure map at the county fair. The map shows the route to the "lost treasure" of the notorious outlaw Jesse James. Pablo can't help but wonder: Is there a link between the map and the gold coin? Pablo is determined to find out.

REVIEW BY COZYWITHABOOK: I just finished reading A Boy Called Duct Tape by Christopher Cloud and could not wait to tell others about it. I would encourage upper elementary and middle grade kids to read this. The book keep my interest as an adult, I smiled, giggled and wondered what was next.

Visit my Facebook page: ron.hutchison.90@facebook.com

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Tami Mathews on January 2, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought the story was different but they didn't go into great detail on why there is a border. I didn't want to stop reading it because it was so different but it was far from a page turner for me. By the end, I couldn't wait for the book to be over.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ann on February 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read it yesterday and was not thrilled with it at all. The story started out well, but by the middle I was questioning the plot and the characters. We never found out what lead to the border between the countries, why was one secular and the other not? It was confusing and hard to follow.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By scienceaggie on March 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was very interested to read this book based on the premise described and see how the description of the US was torn apart along the 38th latitude. The author describes very little about life on either side. He does describe what is considered to be the more conservative side of the latitude but not much. No background at all on how it came to be this way; it just seems to be a story of a group of people escaping for various reasons. The story is mostly surrounding the group and their interactions. And the ending - eep - let's just say I was glad I downloaded it while it was free. The book had so much potential, but just did not deliver.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Parmenides320 on February 23, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It was...okay. The writing wasn't bad, the story kept my interest somewhat (I kept reading it to find out how it ended) but....the synopsis talked about the United States splitting into two separate republics but VERY little of that was mentioned in the book. Yes, we saw the overbearing police-state that was the south but why? Why did this happen? Why was the border closed? What caused the split? What was given in the synopsis on the Amazon website is pretty much all we ever learn about "the state of the nation." The story is pretty much only about a group of people trying to cross the border. We learn a why some of them are taking taking the risk to cross but don't learn everyone's story and even those stories we do learn don't go into much detail. So a group of people we don't know very well are risking everything to cross a border (which could be ANY border - Mexico/US, East Germany/West Germany, Chiina, etc.) for sketchy reasons. It could have done more; it could have been more. The writing was decent enough but the story needs week. Without the information and reasons as to what happened and how it came to be this way, why the people were going and what the "other side" is supposed to be like it's...just another story.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Andres Rosado-Sepulveda on April 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Latitude 38 is about the flight of 8 persons to cross the latitude 38 border, which separates the USS of A (USA North) from the Republic of Pais Nuevo (USA South).

Stand alone, the story is an interesting view on what people are willing to do to reach a forbidden destination to reach their goals. But the story lacks more background. How did the USA actually split? How and why did each half selected their name? Some of these answers are mentioned, but none are explained.

There's at least in-story questions unanswered: how did Uno complete the last leg?

But what was worst for me, was the gratuitous Spanish. The phrases are well intended, but most are plain wrong. For example, "Do you want to par­ty with me?" is translated as "¿Quiere ust­ed al par­tido con­mi­go?" which very loosely half the sentence is missing) means "Do you want to go to the game with me?".

In summary, it's an ok novel, but doesn't have enough background to complete the futuristic picture it paints (if you don't follow USA politics, you'll be lost from the start), some decisions don't make sense (The South calling itself Pais Nuevo?), and the gratuitous Spanish is cumbersome. At $5.99, I would not recommend it.
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23 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Bookworm on December 28, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
The premise of this book made it sound very interesting, however for people running for their lives the characters never seemed very invested in their mission. I wanted to kill most of them off about half way through the book. Small consolation that I didn't pay for this...
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Graubart on September 3, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Latitude 38 by Ron Hutchison Review by Jeff Graubart

I started reading Latitude 38 early this afternoon. Now, late in the evening, I've finished, and save a 30 minute dinner break, I couldn't stop reading. Hutchison proves himself a master of action and suspense.
I did have a little problem swallowing the set-up. Yes, it is certainly possible that the deep polarization affecting the United States could break us apart, but having San Francisco and L.A. end up in the dominionist south, while Wyoming, Idaho, and parts of Kansas end up in the secular north, stretches credibility. The author used the 38th parallel for reasons that become apparent later in the book and once you get past this problem, the novel is rich on several levels.
The characters trying to escape to the secular north, are well developed and a microcosm of the society at large. We see in their flaws and interactions the very fate that divided the nation. And it is most appropriate that we spend the entire novel wondering about the fate of the characters, who will live and who will die, who will end up with whom, who will be redeemed, and who will make it to paradise.
And what of this paradise in the north? There are unsettling clues. Are the stories propaganda or are they real? Again we get hints of what lies ahead in the characters themselves.
Even if you don't care a whit about politics, Hutchison's novel is an action-packed, suspense-filled, seat-of-your-pants thriller, that is guaranteed to entertain.
Latitude 38 is currently available only for the Kindle or Kindle application. At $5.99 it is a perfect accessory to a long cross country flight. It will keep you on the edge of your seat from take-off to landing and costs less than the cookie snack-pack.
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