Leaving Cheyenne: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $3.59 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good condition. Clean pages with average wear. Ready to ship fast!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

LEAVING CHEYENNE : A Novel Paperback – August 1, 2002


See all 38 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.41
$7.58 $0.52
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

LEAVING CHEYENNE : A Novel + The Last Kind Words Saloon: A Novel + Custer
Price for all three: $54.07

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (August 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684853876
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684853871
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #173,406 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The New York Times Book Review A rarity...funny, wonderful, heartbreaking, exhilarating.

San Francisco Chronicle A compelling story...consummate skill.

The New York Times Book Review [Larry McMurtry is] a poet, a resonant scene-setter, and a master of voice.

The Houston Post What an imagination he has! When it comes to spinning a good yarn, few writers do it better than McMurtry.

From the Publisher

6 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Larry McMurtry is the author of twenty-nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Lonesome Dove. His other works include two collections of essays, three memoirs, and more than thirty screenplays, including the coauthorship of Brokeback Mountain, for which he received an Academy Award. His most recent novel, When the Light Goes, is available from Simon & Schuster. He lives in Archer City, Texas.

Customer Reviews

Characters well developed, interesting plot twists and some surprises for sure!
123 123
Again McMurtry is outstanding at developing the most unusual characters, and his interweaving the individual pieces is masterful.
P. Erickson
I'm about to read the final book of the Berrybender clan and I can't wait to get to it.
FreddyB

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

83 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Randy Keehn VINE VOICE on March 13, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book some years ago and I was very impressed. I enjoyed just about all of Larry McMurtry's early (pre-Lonesome Dove) works. Indeed, I felt that his three greatest works were "The Last Picture Show", "Lonesome Dove", and "Leaving Cheyenne". After "Lonesome Dove", I think McMurtry lost a lot of his sense of reality as a writer. In "Leaving Cheyenne", McMurtry tells a common enough love triangle story but in a most unique method. The three characters tell their story from their perspective which, I'm sure, has been done before and probably with greater effect. However, what makes this book special and all the more enjoyable is that each perspective is given from a different point in time. Thus we have the serious young man's perspective, the pragmatic middle aged woman's perspective, and, finally, the fun-loving old geeser's perspective. Bear in mind that these three characters are all essentially the same age but looking at their lives together from a different point of maturity. It works, too. With the serious young man we sense the cold, calculated mistakes of a driven youth. With the pragmatic middle aged woman we see the acceptance that not everything works out the way you would want them to. With the fun-loving old geeser, we see that life is not judged by past mistakes; it's judged by how much fun you're having right now.
I noted some very negative reviews on this book. To each his own. However, it is a short read and I think you may get the same impression I did. It's worth a try.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on May 17, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Larry McMurtry grew up among ranchers and cowboys, and his familiarity with this rural world makes his early novels set in and around Thalia, Texas, genuinely alive with rich detail and believable characters. He knows this world as it's seen and understood by the people who live there, both young and old. Most revealingly (and colorfully) he knows how they really talk to each other and to themselves -- not in the stereotypical ways often ascribed to country people.
You read "Leaving Cheyenne" slowly (the reference is to an old cowboy ballad, not the town in Wyoming), savoring the re-creation of real times and places, even when the story itself may move with no great urgency. The insights into characters and the observance of their behavior make them come alive on the page, and you simply enjoy the portrayals of them, their values, beliefs, and experiences.
Part I of this novel is told from the point of view of Gideon, a rancher's son, about 20 years old, around the year 1920. There is his friend Johnny, from a neighboring ranch, and the two of them compete for the affection of Molly, a barefoot, independent-minded girl who willfully and unwisely marries another boy, an oilfield roustabout.
In Part II, it is 20 years later, during WWII, and Molly, now widowed, remains friends with the middle-aged Gideon and Johnny, each of whom happens to have fathered one of her two sons. This part is told from her point of view. Gideon has married another woman (also unwisely) and has become a prosperous rancher, while Johnny works for him, content to be a happy-go-lucky cowboy. Molly lives alone, her sons off to war, and yearns for the company of each of her two old friends and lovers.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Perhaps one of the least known(popular)but greatest works from McMurtry. Three life stories are woven thoughout this tale as this story picks up where Horeseman Pass By leaves off, with regard to character development.
If you are a fan of Lonesome Dove, Moving On or All My Friends Are Going To Be Strangers, you cannot help but marvel at this earlier work which puts most modern works to shame.
The characters and scenery are depicted with a subtle brilliance and the prose is magnificent. This book could be described as a blend of both Faulkner and McCarthy with regards to writing-you can feel the influence from the former and on the latter.
Pardon my long winded comments. Buy the book and revel in it's brilliance.-
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By CamelCamelCamel on June 21, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't intend to write a full-on review; I figure there are enough here already. I just wanted to add my five-star rating to the overall, and summarize how I feel about this book.
It took a while to get started, but it subtly endeared its characters to me so much that I finished it off in a three-hour sitting. Before I knew it I loved the characters, I loved the book, and I was sad that it was over. And I guess that's that, huh?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bomojaz on September 1, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Gideon Fry and his ranch hand Johnny McCloud are both in love with neighboring rancher Molly Taylor. The novel, in three parts, allows each character a chance to relate his and her take on this life-long three-way love affair. As in most of McMurtry's fiction, it's the woman who comes across as the one best in knowing exactly what she wants and in control of the situation. McMurtry is funny, poignant, and above all, interesting and entertaining in these pages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By martyfriedman@jmperry.com on May 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
I read this book when it came out in the early 60's and loved it. I just re-read it to see if it would still have the same effect on me. I am pleased to report that it retains its wonderful writing, innocence, fine descriptions of nature,and that it opened my heart once again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?