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LP3


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Audio CD, July 8, 2008
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Biography

Ratatat (Mike Stroud and Evan Mast) are pleased to announce the release of LP4 through XL Recordings on June 8, 2010. LP4 is the follow up to LP3 which was released to worldwide critical acclaim in July 2008.

The album, their fourth for XL, was conceived following the prolific LP3 recording sessions at Old Soul Studios, in rural upstate New York and much of the album was ultimately was ... Read more in Amazon's Ratatat Store

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LP3 + LP4 + Classics
Price for all three: $38.97

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 8, 2008)
  • Original Release Date: 2008
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Xl Recordings
  • ASIN: B0019EI0EY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #107,490 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Shiller
2. Falcon Jab
3. Mi Viejo
4. Mirando
5. Flynn
6. Bird-Priest
7. Shempi
8. Imperials
9. Dura
10. Bruleé
11. Mumtaz Khan
12. Gipsy Threat
13. Black Heros

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Their third studio album, following 2006's "Classics." The characteristic guitar style is still present here, but there are an abundance of new textures, from Wurlitzer and mellotron to live rather than programmed percussion. The album will be preceded by the release of the limited edition 7-inch "Shiller", a completely beatless track which opens the new album.

Review

"Ratatat make a thick instrumental soup with equal dashes of analog touch and digital chaos. Everything from slide guitar to sleigh bells and harsh metal riffs to club dance beats get chopped up and mixed up in their concoction that gets the whole crowd moving." --Slap

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 24 customer reviews
Buy it, take the time to relax and enjoy.
Paul
Anyone who has enjoyed their previous albums is highly likely to dig LP3, and I also think this would be daring starting point for new listeners.
mroxie
LP3 is a strange menagerie of the complexity and breadth of electronic music.
Kenyon J. Weidle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Kenyon J. Weidle on July 10, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Ratatat definitely has a recognizable sound. Once you know it, it's easy to pick out. With this being the case, LP3 is very interesting.

The instrumentation in LP3 is easily recognizable as Ratatat; however, the album feels dramatically different from their first two efforts. The band is less interested in dropping a danceable beat and then rocking through it with blazing guitars. Instead, they attempt to use their buzzes, beeps, and fuzzy riffs to create epic soundscapes. Try to imagine a video game based on the travel of an ordinary man to a strange and unexplored planet. The discoveries he makes will change the path of human history for ever. And so while the overall sound belongs distinctly to Ratatat, the concept feels very different. The band has evolved tremendously for the better.

LP3 is a strange menagerie of the complexity and breadth of electronic music. The opening track, Shiller, introduces us to Ratatat's new direction. The ebb and flow of harpsichord and electro-guitar builds the strange soundscape in which the rest of the album resides. Mi Viejo features a flamenco tinged acoustic guitar piece placed against clattering drums. Following is Mirando, driven with atypical drumming. And the album carries on, stretching a repertoire I never knew Ratatat possessed. LP3 eventually ends with Black Heroes, a pleasant, cheery ditty.

The album affects the listener much like The Flaming Lips' Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. It's captivating, curious, weird, and wonderful. While lacking the lyrical prowess of Yoshimi (and lacking lyrics period), Ratatat packs LP with alien vistas viewed through the virtual reality of electronic music. To many listeners you won't find anything like it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Kwan on July 10, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Unlike Classic and Ratatat (their first album) LP is much more tone down... then their previous work... It has a mix of Hip Hop style dance feel to it. But still retains the Electronic rhythm that Ratatat has always done so well in. This is one album that at first you might not get right into it, but after a listening to it a few times, I've grown to like it...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By mroxie on July 16, 2008
Format: Audio CD
With each release, Ratatat has further pushed the boundaries of modern instrumental music. In their first album, Ratatat, they introduced their sound, causing people to wonder "Is it electronic, video game-style music? Is it rock?" It's both! With Classics, they refined that sound, and indeed made a 'classic' album chock full of catchy tunes and interesting soundscapes. On LP3, while the pacing of the songs is largely similar to those in their previous albums, in that there are plodding, atmospheric numbers along with punchier ones, the mix of textures heard here is quite rich and varied, blending to create clear pictures of where they might be heard. For instance, I interpret "Mirando" as a trip through a jungle in a river boat, "Flynn": the gloomy backdrop for walking in the rain, "Shempi": from a disco dance floor, "Dura": a picture of neo-Victorianism."Mumtaz Khan", perhaps my favorite, sounds like belly-dancing music!

Due to the diverse nature of the tracks, some listeners might not find this album as accessible as the other two. Sure, there is the ever-present, familiar Ratatat sound (especially on "Falcon Jab") oftentimes, but this group has made so much progress in this album I can't say that there has been anything comparible in scope released by other bands in recent years. LP3 strikes me as a soundtrack of some non-existent movie, and I wouldn't be surprised if, in the future, Ratatat were approached to compose film scores. Anyone who has enjoyed their previous albums is highly likely to dig LP3, and I also think this would be daring starting point for new listeners.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jon Gilman on July 9, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Ratatat's latest release is exactly what the Ratatat fan knows them to sound like. The songs have the distinct slide guitar in them, over some great beats. It's apparent the group used some live percussion playing (as opposed to a recorded beat). There's some new influences in the music as well: "Mumtaz Khan" reminds me of a middle eastern dance club; "Flynn" has a touch of reggae. Overall there are more elements to the songs, and exciting, lively beats to make you want to dance...or go for a run (as I did). Love this group, they have amazing potential to be producers (Ratatat Remixes). Highly recommend this cd to the veteran Ratatat fan, or to anyone interested in hearing some fun and unique music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By cRc on December 2, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Occupies the musical niche that exists somewhere between Beethoven, Bob Marley, and Daft Punk. The concept sounds pretty impossible, but I can't really think of specific genre of music this album comes closer to. The mood of the songs tends to veer between slightly dancey, slightly melancholy, slightly angry, but when they pull out all the stops (as in Shempi, which I think is track 7) the effect is absolutely epic.

So overall, as weird as it is, I can't recommend it enough.
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Format: MP3 Music
With the release of Ratatat's next album LP4 slated to hit the airwaves this spring, I felt it would be interesting to revisit their previous work, particularly their 2008 record LP3, in anticipation of the LP4 release. Ratatat includes band members Mike Stroud and Evan Mast, who work together to blend traditional instruments, synthesizers, and electronic sound, as well as naturally occurring and computer generated samples. Unfortunately, a cursory glance of both the band's official website ([...]), as well as its MySpace page ([...]), reveals only limited information on the band and their music creation. Thus, most of my analysis will be drawn directly from my personal listening experience, and not particularly grounded in technical phraseology.

LP3 totals 13 tracks, and clocks in at a total runtime of just less than 45 minutes. Interestingly, the longest song is actually the opener: "Shiller." Of the 13 tracks, 9 of them fall between the 3-minute to 4-and-a-half-minute range, which I would deem captures most popular, mainstream music. In terms of compositional length, there is nothing too profound about LP3. There are a few noticeably shorter tracks sprinkled in such as "Flynn" (1:55) and "Gypsy Threat" (1:38). Both songs possess relatively little complexity and development. Their simplicity, in conjunction with their length, gives them an interlude-like feel that serves to move the album along, but not much else. Overall, I think the pacing and arrangement of tracks on LP3 is adequately effective.

Musically, the album has a feel that is similar to the group's previous albums: the self-titled "Ratatat" and "Classics." LP3's minimal reliance on vocals lends itself to an intense focus on the instrumental aspects.
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