Labor and Monopoly Capital and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.00
  • Save: $6.48 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 16 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Worn Book, Clean Text, Some pencil marks throughout, Good Binding, Heavy Wear. Ships Now.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0853459408 ISBN-10: 0853459401 Edition: Anv

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.52
$12.52 $5.50
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$55.00

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century + Manufacturing Consent: Changes in the Labor Process Under Monopoly Capitalism
Price for both: $36.46

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 465 pages
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press; Anv edition (December 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0853459401
  • ISBN-13: 978-0853459408
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #161,995 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Harry Braverman was director of Monthly Review Press at the time of his death in 1976. John Bellamy Foster is associate professor of sociology at the University of Oregon, author of The Vulnerable Planet, and co-editor of In Defense of History: Marxism and Postmodern Agenda.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 66 people found the following review helpful By David A. Beaton on February 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
Labor and Monopoly Power, by Harry Braverman, brings basic Marxist labor theory up to date for the modern age. Though written 25 years ago, Braverman's work is the ideal guideline to understanding the age of information technology. Braverman expertly explodes the smug myths of "knowledge age" boosters by drawing the parallels to earlier industrial technology. The major misapprehension exploded is the one that says workplace automation demands higher skills and upgrades jobs. Braverman, through developing and applying the ideas not only of Marx, but of management proponents such as Babbage, Taylor and Bright, makes a convincing case for the opposite. Computers, like other technology before them, are being applied in ways that expose two objectives: (1) the reduction of the absolute numbers of workers, and (2) the reduction of skills among the remaining workers. Braverman's 1974 book was prophetic in that it described longstanding capitalist relationships that, applied vigorously since that time, have led to increasing income inequality in America.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By left hook on October 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
The finest book on economics from the last half of the 20th century. No one should claim they understand capitalism if they can't address the fundamental points of this book. It shows Why Labor Matters--and how suppressing the social and political power of labor makes the system work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By disidente on July 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a very detailed study, written by a writer who had been a skilled craft worker earlier in his life, not an academic. The book provides a good theoretical understanding of the way the logic of capitalist development degrades work. Through his discussion of Taylorism, aka "scientific management," Braverman shows how the breaking up of work into tasks and then re-defining the jobs is used to concentrate the conceptual and decision-making control into a hierarchy, and the control of workers is thus diminished. Capitalists will tend to do this because it strengthens their bargaining clout in dealing with workers.

But this is not a "technological determinist" argument. On the contrary, in his intro Braverman criticizes technological determinism. Rather, it is a particular social system, particular class interests, that shape decisions about what techniques are used in production. Technology is not neutral or independent of who controls it.

The alternative, which Braverman has hinted at in some of his writings, would be an economic system in which the physical work is re-integrated with the conceptual and decision-making tasks so that workers would become masters of production. But this would require a different economic system than capitalism, a labor-managed economic system.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By P. Webster on March 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
Braverman's book is subtitled "The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century", but it is still very relevant in the twenty-first. It shows the effects of the development of capitalism on the nature of work (the labour process) and on the composition of the working class since Marx's time.

Braverman shows how several factors combine to make the labour process an alienating one under capitalism: capitalist management and control; the way the capitalists use new technology; the division of labour; and the separation of the "conception" or planning side of work from its "execution". Underlying all these, of course, is the lack of control by workers over the means of production.

He shows how the capitalists try to deskill as far as possible every new type of skilled job that is thrown up by their ever-changing system, so that they can both reduce wage levels and also more easily control the alienated labour of the workers.

Finally, Braverman was also one of the first Marxists to show in detail how white collar workers have become part of the working class, and how even many "professional" jobs are being proletarianised.

Phil Webster.
(England)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William H. DuBay on June 11, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is not enough that capitalism alienates workers from the wealth created by their work, it also makes their work less meaningful.

Harry Braverman's landmark 1974 study, "Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Labor" is an update of Marx's "Capital."

Many of the critics of Marx said that his findings about the frustrations of wage labor applied to factory workers. Modern technology would eventually eliminate the tedium and alienation associated with assembly-line work.

Braverman shows that, with all the changes in the work-force and technology, that did not happen. It has gotten worse. Wage workers still don't like their jobs.

Did you ever wonder why the press and media pay so little attention to work and workers while constantly elevating leisure, consumption, travel, and wealth? We are taught always to look forward to "labor-saving" devices and new technologies. Science will solve all the unpleasantness of work and poverty.

The media ignores workers and jobs because it is intent on proving the teaching in Genesis that work is indeed a punishment for original sin. Capitalists don't want to put workers in charge of their jobs and don't want them to seem capable of doing that.

It was Adam Smith in "The Wealth of Nations" who first warned of the "de-skilling" of work in the factory system. As an example, he used the making of pins, which once was done by a single craftsman. In factories, it was done by 16 different people doing 16 different, simple procedures. (Now machines do the whole thing.)

The Popes' encyclicals on social justice often repeated Smith's warning about the de-humanization of work and turning humans into machines.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0x9a3df78c)