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Labyrinth

August 20, 2013 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
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6:06
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5:10
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4:18
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5:42
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4:32
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5:12
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4:39
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1:07
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5:44
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10
7:26
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11
4:25
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Product Details

Customer Reviews

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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
What a monster of an album this is. "Agony" was a masterpiece, this is something even beyond (if that's even possible). I should make a note right away that if you're not into the symphonic and operatic sounds that Fleshgod so deftly mixes into their intensely brutal tech-death-metal, well then you probably won't like this album. What might annoy you even more is Paolo Rossi's wailing banshee "operatic" vocals, which sound more like an opera singer being murdered somewhere in the blackest of night. Right from the first track "Kingborn" they hit you with the operatic vocals, lush symphonic movements that wash over you in waves. By the time you get to the second track "Minotaur" you are start thinking this shit is serious, this is metal that will be talked about 25 years from now, this will join the pantheon of epic metal recordings we hail today as genius.

It occurs to me that I should point out the driving, intense metal is NOT some kind of loose reference in this recording, it's not in the background or a second thought. Neither is the operatic/symphonic/piano elements. As the artists have stated in many an interview, this is a painstakingly assembled recording. The drums -- the drums! they sound like .50 cal machine guns, so intense -- the drums, guitars, bass, all is mixed to perfection. I can't imagine anyone but Cristiano Trionfera on vocals, his guttrals give so much punch and dynamism to this album. I've read a few comments from Internet trolls saying the guitars are mixed too low. Rubbish.

I have to admit that this is the only symphonic death metal band I listen to; I'm generally not a fan of the subgenre, mainly because I find symphonic music challenging to listen to. My taste in metal is pretty straight forward.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm new to Fleshgod, I first got into the symphonic movement with Septic Flesh.
I started right at the beginning with Fleshgod and the masterful Oracles and worked my way up to the pummeling Agony.
I was eager to hear how the band would evolve on the new album and I'm pleased to write that the intricate guitar work from Oracles has wiggled its way into the orchestral madness.
Every song is a stand out.
Like Agony it takes multiple spins for this one to really sink in.
I'll be honest, I hated Agony the first time I heard it.
Same with Labyrinth...so I kept spinning the stream online the band put up and after about the third listen it really sank in.
I immediately purchased the disc.
Spectacular production.
Mixing this kind of death metal must be a daunting task but it was pulled off amazingly well.
Symphonic.
Intricate.
Majestic.
Brutastic
Recommended.
2 Comments 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Some say that you cannot have a successful life of achievement without first having to enslave or ruin the life of another. Fleshgod Apocalypse wishes to remind us of that. This Italian band has created a dramatic soundtrack to the brutality of the human condition, what man does to himself and his fellow man in order to fulfill his own desires. Would it not be fitting for such a subject, long since rendered in the classical arts, to be accompanied by a dramatic symphonic score?!

The release of Labyrinth marks the next milestone in Fleshgod Apocalypse's career. Having been blown away by their previous effort Agony, I was quite surprised to see the group ready to release another monumentous work this summer. Already released in Europe, I happened to get my copy early when Fleshgod Apocalypse came with Wintersun to my local area and I got to see the masters in person. It meant having to miss part of Wintersun's set, but it was worth it to get to meet the band themselves, particularly the pianist Ferrini. Their show was amazing! They had their tuxedos and their guitars were polished wood with f-holes just like violins (nice touch)! I was also surprised to see the female opera singer Veronica who did studio vocal acrobatics for Agony on stage with the band on tour in a black robe and feathered masquerade masks. It all was a rather gothic visual setup, but you would not know it from the violent mosh pit they got out of the crowd!!! Anyways aside from meeting and chatting with the band, I was able to get a copy of Labyrinth they had brought with them from Europe which was very cool! I took it home, crashed out of exhaustion, woke up the next morning and immediately put that disc on my stereo and got ready for the incredible onslaught that was sure to come...
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Format: Audio CD
After 2011's Agony, Fleshgod Apocalypse became a force to be reckoned within the metal community. Sure, Orales and Mafia were quite well received, but jumping to Nuclear Blast for Agony and the sonic shift that accompanied it made them much more of a household name so to speak. I personally gushed all over Agony when it was released but found myself more drawn to their back catalog after the initial 'spark' of Agony had disappeared a few months after it's release. This was mostly due to the flat production of Agony and the shift that saw the band surrendering all of the interesting musicianship from the guitars to the synths. Still, when Labyrinth was announced, you could toss my name in among the many to set skyscraper-level expectations and the earlier release of the track "Elegy" did nothing to change that. Now after listening to this an embarrassing large number of times this week, I feel comfortable saying that Labyrinth pretty much wipes the floor with Agony and sees the band at the absolute top of their game.

Instead of simply being Agony part II, Labyrinth cranks up everything in the band's arsenal up to 11. The orchestration is notably more epic in scale, with more operatic vocals in place from Veronic Bordacchini. While Agony had a slight concept to it, Labyrinth tells the tale of the Labyrinth of Knossos and has a very unified feel to it. Most importantly, the guitars, which felt slightly neutered last time around, have found their way back into the mix. The union of the orchestra and the guitarwork is much more synchronized and it seems the band has found a way to create a middle ground between that of Oracles and Agony.
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